DNA test casts doubt on executed Texa...

DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt

There are 36 comments on the TwinCities.com story from Nov 11, 2010, titled DNA test casts doubt on executed Texas man's guilt. In it, TwinCities.com reports that:

A DNA test on a single hair has cast doubt on the guilt of a Texas man who was put to death 10 years ago for a liquor-store murder - an execution that went forward after then-Gov. George W. Bush's staff failed to tell him the condemned man was asking for genetic analysis of the strand.

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Willys

Minneapolis, MN

#1 Nov 11, 2010
It's a shame that someone has to die to show that an incompetent surrounds himself with equally incompetent people
Sick of Politics

Saint Paul, MN

#2 Nov 11, 2010
Sigh...
Here we go.
Dick L

Saint Paul, MN

#3 Nov 11, 2010
I'm all for capital punishment but, only if there is no doubt about being guilty of the crime in question. I also don't believe a man who is quilty of said crime should sit on death row indefinitely and waste taxpayers money.

Since: May 09

Location hidden

#4 Nov 11, 2010
A comment for people who do not bother to read the whole article.

"He said his father "told me that he had robbed banks, that he was a thief. But he wasn't a person who would go out and murder someone on the street."

NO, BUT HE WOULD KILL SOMEONE LOCKED UP IN JAIL WITH HIM ?????

"Prosecutors also hammered on Jones' brutal past. While serving a 21-year prison sentence in Kansas, he poured a flammable liquid on his cellmate and set him on fire, killing him. " (James Tarr)

Just another case of a murderer sentenced to LIFE and getting out on parole and killing again. BTW he was identified by TWO witnesses who saw the murder and he told the police that he killed the victim (Allen Hilzendager) because he was gay.

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#5 Nov 11, 2010
A song about a man named Joe Arridy, who was wrongly convicted of murder and eventually executed in 1939. He was said to have the mind of a 5-year old. In 2007 a group of citizens interested in Joe's story raised the money for a tombstone to be placed on his grave. The walk of a condemned man from his cell to the gas chamber was called the Woodpecker Waltz, as executed prisoners were buried on Woodpecker Hill in Canon City, Colorado.
&fe ature=related

Since: May 09

Location hidden

#6 Nov 11, 2010
You might want to go to this link to read about the case.

https://www.oag.state.tx.us/newspubs/newsarch...

Since: Jan 09

Location hidden

#7 Nov 11, 2010
Oops...

It's a little late for double checking I'd say.

Maybe they should use the testing funds to test cases where the sentence has not been yet "executed".

Since: Jan 10

United States

#8 Nov 11, 2010
Let's see, sentenced to 3 concurrent 9-yr terms in '59, then a 5-yr term in '63, then 26 years in '68, then life plus 20 years while in prison- also in '68. Finally, this incident happened in '89.??? What do those sentences mean? Evidently nothing, since as I read it he should have been behind bars until '94, when the latest charges (life and 20 years) would BEGIN! This was not an innocent man. No qualms about the execution.
Rich U

United States

#9 Nov 11, 2010
Bill----- wrote:
A comment for people who do not bother to read the whole article.
"He said his father "told me that he had robbed banks, that he was a thief. But he wasn't a person who would go out and murder someone on the street."
NO, BUT HE WOULD KILL SOMEONE LOCKED UP IN JAIL WITH HIM ?????
"Prosecutors also hammered on Jones' brutal past. While serving a 21-year prison sentence in Kansas, he poured a flammable liquid on his cellmate and set him on fire, killing him. " (James Tarr)
Just another case of a murderer sentenced to LIFE and getting out on parole and killing again. BTW he was identified by TWO witnesses who saw the murder and he told the police that he killed the victim (Allen Hilzendager) because he was gay.
Texas kills killers.
Rich U

United States

#10 Nov 11, 2010
Thrall wrote:
Let's see, sentenced to 3 concurrent 9-yr terms in '59, then a 5-yr term in '63, then 26 years in '68, then life plus 20 years while in prison- also in '68. Finally, this incident happened in '89.??? What do those sentences mean? Evidently nothing, since as I read it he should have been behind bars until '94, when the latest charges (life and 20 years) would BEGIN! This was not an innocent man. No qualms about the execution.
Texas kills killers.
Rich U

United States

#11 Nov 11, 2010
Bill----- wrote:
You might want to go to this link to read about the case.
https://www.oag.state.tx.us/newspubs/newsarch...
This is why Texas kills killers.
Rich U

United States

#12 Nov 11, 2010
Had About Enough wrote:
Oops...
It's a little late for double checking I'd say.
Maybe they should use the testing funds to test cases where the sentence has not been yet "executed".
Either that or let Dr.Frankenstein & Igor start digging around.
I asked guys that know

Saint Paul, MN

#13 Nov 11, 2010
Some years ago I served in a military reserve unit with two guys who were professional prison guards. They were reservists like me. I asked them what they thought about the death penalty. To my surprise, they were opposed to the death penalty. "Why?" I asked. They said that they knew of cases, people, condemned to death that they were convinced were innocent. Their answers changed my opinion on the issue. Now I oppose the death penalty. Talking to them was a real learning experience.

Since: Jan 10

United States

#14 Nov 11, 2010
Why don't we compromise on the death penalty? In cases of purely circumstantial evidence, give life imprisonment. With incontrovertible evidence (like the muslim psychiatrist) kill them....but quicker.
Hmmmmm

United States

#15 Nov 12, 2010
I asked guys that know wrote:
Some years ago I served in a military reserve unit with two guys who were professional prison guards. They were reservists like me. I asked them what they thought about the death penalty. To my surprise, they were opposed to the death penalty. "Why?" I asked. They said that they knew of cases, people, condemned to death that they were convinced were innocent. Their answers changed my opinion on the issue. Now I oppose the death penalty. Talking to them was a real learning experience.
I like your post. It is rare that people change their minds about something as emotionally charged as the death penalty. I used to support it also until I came to realize: the discrimination (women don't get the death penalty), the cost (12 times the amount to execute over holding them in prison for life), it may be cruel and unusual (can't "test" for such things, anytime you give someone the "lethal combination, it is just that, so... you can't test it out to see if it is torture or not), and the fact that you can't remedy the situation once the sentence is carried out (in the event you discover PROOF of innocence). I wish more people would open their minds like you did. Texans love the death penalty and even if an INNOCENT person was put to death, the response would be, "well look at how many guilty ones didn't get away". Thank you, you gave me a much needed boost that I needed. There is hope out there for the human race, if we are just willing to be humane and open our minds.
DFL are Clowns

Saint Paul, MN

#16 Nov 12, 2010
I'm tired of these scumbags getting off on small technicalities. If you read the case, this guy was guilty. Glad he has met his maker.
Scud13

Manchester, CT

#17 Nov 12, 2010
When cops lie and prosecutors with hold evidence innocent people go to prison. When will prosecutors and cops be held liable. They should serve out the sentence of the people they put in prison.
Mike Farrell

Minneapolis, MN

#19 Nov 12, 2010
I'd like to know why "DNA evidence" is good enough to free people from "death row" (often in weeks or months), but never seems good enough to execute someone on "death row".

Instead, they sit there for years .

I say 2 appeal, 5 years, whichever comes 1st.
Mike Farrell

Minneapolis, MN

#20 Nov 12, 2010
The only reason it "costs more to execute than life in prison" is because the same people who are opposed to capital punishment are in favor of unlimited appeals.

It's like saying "you can't cross the ocean because it's too expensive" .(because the ONLY way you choose to cross it is by building a giant bridge)
Buttomfly

Madison, WI

#21 Nov 12, 2010
The first time someone is wrongly put to death without irrefutable evidence, someone should sit in prison for murder. Or maybe a couple of people. Whoever is responsible, whether perjury, cooked up evidence, or a rogue prosecutor. If that were hanging over their heads maybe, just maybe they would try harder to make sure the evidence is there. It's just a matter of time before DNA proves someone has been innocent. I am obviously opposed to capital punishment except when there is iron clad evidence to prove premeditated murder, repeated molestation especially of children, or of crimes so heinous the mind cannot comprehend the evil.

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