Since: Mar 12

Crescent City, FL

#143 Apr 15, 2012
Really wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree with a lot that you have to stay. To elect Simmons or Reno would be a very poor decision by the voters. I also find it funny that a few people in these forums think the Sheriff has noting to do do but hang out all day and meet people. That gripe about how they do not see the Sheriff out and about. HE IS BUSY PEOPLE BEING THE SHERIFF!!!!! No Sheriff has time to conduct daily meet and greets; except maybe Masters. His lack of experience, police academy training, college education and his total lack of knowledge about law enforcement in general would make him incapable of performing the tasks of Sheriff. So, he should have plenty of time to hang out!
I disagree with you about Larry Masters. I think he would make a great sheriff. The sheriff's job is mainly administration anyway. Hardy had no experience with that. He still isn't any good at it. Heck, he wasn't even a good road cop. If you consider taking care of business as a game of golf then I guess you'd be right. I, on the other hand, don't think that is a great sheriff. I think the sheriff should make an effort to communicate with the public. Remember, he is an elected official. That means the tax payers are his boss. As is his deputies. All he knows how to do is go to the county commissioners and beg for more money. The county gave him 4 million dollars more and what did he do with it? He kept his campaign promises to his friends with promotions and raises at the tax payers expense. Someone like Masters, who has business sense, and has no "dirt" on him, that is who we need as sheriff. Remember, the sheriff's job is mainly adiministration. We need someone to cut the fat out of the sheriff's department. And who better than someone with business experience and sense? April 30th is the sheriff's debate. I would advise everyone to go and listen to all the lies that spew from Hardy's mouth. Actually, listen to all the candidates and decide for yourselves who you believe.
veto

Palatka, FL

#144 Apr 15, 2012
Hey mcfarrentfiveo, you are wrong, Hardy has done a great job. I know it is hard to get out and meet everyone on a daily basis, but he has done more that anyone in the past administration. He will keep doing the best job he can. This is why myself and a lot of other people will be voting for Hardy again. I just wonder what job masters promised you.
No Way

Palatka, FL

#145 Apr 15, 2012
McGarretFiveO wrote:
<quoted text>
I disagree with you about Larry Masters. I think he would make a great sheriff. The sheriff's job is mainly administration anyway. Hardy had no experience with that. He still isn't any good at it. Heck, he wasn't even a good road cop. If you consider taking care of business as a game of golf then I guess you'd be right. I, on the other hand, don't think that is a great sheriff. I think the sheriff should make an effort to communicate with the public. Remember, he is an elected official. That means the tax payers are his boss. As is his deputies. All he knows how to do is go to the county commissioners and beg for more money. The county gave him 4 million dollars more and what did he do with it? He kept his campaign promises to his friends with promotions and raises at the tax payers expense. Someone like Masters, who has business sense, and has no "dirt" on him, that is who we need as sheriff. Remember, the sheriff's job is mainly adiministration. We need someone to cut the fat out of the sheriff's department. And who better than someone with business experience and sense? April 30th is the sheriff's debate. I would advise everyone to go and listen to all the lies that spew from Hardy's mouth. Actually, listen to all the candidates and decide for yourselves who you believe.
The belief that all it takes is "business sense" is very flawed. I get the feeling that you have no idea what being Sheriff is all about. As the Chief Law Enforcement Officer of the county, does it not make sense for the Sheriff to know law enforcement. How can we as citizens expect him to work with the State's Attorney and state legislators to enact laws, converse with judges and other Sheriffs and lead law enforcement officers with absolutely no knowledge of the subject matter? Is is not a good idea for a person running a business to know something about the business he is running? Masters is a nice guy, I met him at a gathering at the Riverside Fire Department, but after speaking with him it became obvious to me that he has no business being the Sheriff. I will be voting for Jeff Hardy again.
Mee

Bradenton, FL

#146 Apr 16, 2012
No Way wrote:
<quoted text>The belief that all it takes is "business sense" is very flawed. I get the feeling that you have no idea what being Sheriff is all about. As the Chief Law Enforcement Officer of the county, does it not make sense for the Sheriff to know law enforcement. How can we as citizens expect him to work with the State's Attorney and state legislators to enact laws, converse with judges and other Sheriffs and lead law enforcement officers with absolutely no knowledge of the subject matter? Is is not a good idea for a person running a business to know something about the business he is running? Masters is a nice guy, I met him at a gathering at the Riverside Fire Department, but after speaking with him it became obvious to me that he has no business being the Sheriff. I will be voting for Jeff Hardy again.
Make good sense

Since: Mar 12

Crescent City, FL

#147 Apr 16, 2012
veto wrote:
Hey mcfarrentfiveo, you are wrong, Hardy has done a great job. I know it is hard to get out and meet everyone on a daily basis, but he has done more that anyone in the past administration. He will keep doing the best job he can. This is why myself and a lot of other people will be voting for Hardy again. I just wonder what job masters promised you.
I can ask you the same thing. What has Hardy promised you? No, Masters hasn't promised me anything. No, I'm retired law enforcement, I don't need a job. 4 years ago I supported Hardy. I even posted about what a great guy he was. But, now I have seen what a bad person he is. Now that I'm retired, I see him on the golf course alot! Next time you see Hardy ask him how his golf game is. As a matter of fact, since he is running for re-election, he doesn't play golf in Putnam County as often. Now he goes to St. Augustine and Volusia County. I don't endorse Masters. But I will consider him in the general election. But, right now I'm leaning towards Reno in the primary. Educate yourself before you vote so that you can make an informed vote.
good idea

Palatka, FL

#148 Apr 16, 2012
McGarretFIVEO said he was retire and not going to vote for Hardy because he plays golf too much. The job of SHERIFF is important to the residents in this county but it is still not a 24-7 a day job. It is indeed an AS NEEDED job and as long as any sheriff is doing his job when nedded, they are still able to have personal time to relax and possibly talk business and problems while on the golf course. One place to get away and able to talk. Other people who are running for sheriff also have other interest, that does not make anyone bad or wrong for holding an office.
If you have issues with time on the job there are certainly many more places to be looking in this county than the sheriffs office.
CCAC

Gainesville, FL

#149 Apr 20, 2012
not impressed wrote:
read Simmons web site, didn't see anything to peak my interest. Did see him at the fair, sitting alone
and walking the grounds alone. If he is so good and feels he is qulified to be sheriff then why did he not make use of his time while he was in charge after the last election. Kelly was in the wind looking for a job and Simmons was then in charge. Heard him say once that he often went back to work at night to check the safety of the other deputies. Being so concerned, you would think he would have talked to someone and gotten the locks
in the jail fixed. If the information was made public then maybe future events would have gone differently. Saftey must have taken second seat to the gym and the drug store. He has nothing to show for 25 years except lots of ugly bulges.
Do you really want to go there? Paula Carter was in charge of the jail for 4 years before hardy and nothing got fixed. I don't like hardy but the jail part was torn way down before he took over and his officers knew this. If she had done her job and gotten things fixed instead of going to lunch with reno every day then the escapes may not have happened. There is policy that is not followed in that jail by anyone in the ranks including the majors. So did you really want to go there I will ask again?

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#150 Apr 22, 2012
Everyone responsible failed. Several officers were held accountable, and Hardy is responsible for them. It wasn't just the conditions of the jail, it was also the GROSS NEGLECT of these corrections officers who failed to follow procedure. Because of the known conditions they should have doubled their efforts to be cautious, but didn't. Hardy failed to see that his officers acted properly and I have a feeling they also lacked the training necessary to ensure safety. Too bad there isn't a state course on how to be a good sheriff.
Here's the full outline in case you missed it;

Cascade of errors led to Putnam jail break
Sheriff accepts responsibility, vows to clean up problems
DANA TREEN
Morris News Service
Published Monday, June 15, 2009

For 12 days, the smuggled jack Timothy Wayne Fletcher and Doni Ray Brown used to tear through a wall and escape the Putnam County jail rested unnoticed above their cell door. For years, rust chewed at the perimeter fencing the two inmates scaled or crawled under on the way to a murderous jail break. Fence sections were broken or missing critical support members, making them easy to breach. And in the final day before the escape, lax security let Fletcher and Brown pull together the last pieces of a plan that gave them hours of head start on a three-day spree across the Southeast before being recaptured. In a six-volume internal report, Putnam County Sheriff's Office investigators chronicle the deep security problems and deteriorating conditions that contributed to the April escape. Sheriff Jeff Hardy said he accepts responsibility for the escape and is making fixes and has tightened policies. "It seems to me there has been a breakdown in practices," said the sheriff who won election to the office in the fall. On June 3 he released findings of the internal investigation, announcing the disciplining of seven staffers, the reassignment of an eighth and the jail director's resignation. "There's a lot of human error here," he said Friday. In December the Putnam County Commission committed money to fix chronic problems with cell locks. Since the escape, federal stimulus money will be dedicated to other repairs and the Sheriff's Office is applying for grant money to pay for a video visitation system that will improve security. While those changes are in the works, many weren't in place in mid-April. Fletcher, 25, and Brown, 23, have been charged with murder in the slaying of Fletcher's step-grandmother, Helen Key Googe, 66, who likely died before a guard doing cell checks at the jail miles away noticed the men were gone.
No pat-downs
After their arrests, the men told detectives they were out of the jail at 2 a.m. April 15. They weren't missed until three hours later. Internal investigation interviews with jail supervisors and officers show that for years inmates coming back from court weren't patted down for contraband, and the major in charge of the jail said she wasn't aware that inmates weren't being searched. Maj. Paula Carter, who resigned a day before the report was concluded, told internal affairs investigators the reasoning she was given was that inmates were considered to be in uninterrupted and secure custody to and from court. The policy to search inmates when they came back to jail had been dropped years ago, investigators learned. The oversight was a linchpin in the escape, allowing Fletcher to somehow grab a bottle jack from its cubbyhole in a transport van and smuggle it into the jail on April 2. He had been wearing a cast on his left leg, which helped hide the tool. Inside the jail the squat, powerful jack was hidden above and behind an overhead fixture in front of the cell he and Brown shared. Although it was a clever hiding spot, Hardy said it should have been found.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#151 Apr 22, 2012
Shared cell
At the same time, a policy designed to keep inmates such as Brown and Fletcher in separate cells because they faced charges in the same case wasn't followed. An order to keep them apart was somehow dropped when Fletcher was transferred to the Clay County jail for a day in March. When he returned, he was allowed to bunk with Brown. With the jack smuggled into the jail, the two men also needed to be sure they could buy time once they escaped. A lax policy on what inmates are allowed to keep in their cells may have helped them collect the bedding and other material to fashion dummy bodies that fooled a guard at least twice during nighttime bed checks. Inmates who say they were missing clothing, bedding or other items were given those things without backup checks, investigators found. In a cleanup after the escape, bins of sheets, clothes and other items inmates weren't supposed to have were removed from cells. In videotapes of the bed checks the night of the escape, guard Leland Evans can be seen shining a flashlight briefly into the men's corner cell and not noticing they were gone. Evans, who was fired, told investigators a burned out light above the cell made it difficult to see inside but said he saw what he thought was Brown's hand. The final piece of the escape came together about 14 hours before the breakout. On another trip back from the courthouse Fletcher smuggled a second piece of the jack - the handle - past a booking desk, into a holding cell and into the jail pod. Taped by video cameras, Fletcher can be seen adjusting a baggy jail uniform to keep the handle hidden. Later that day, surveillance tape shows Brown retrieving the jack from its hiding place and taking it into the cell. Surveillance of Fletcher bringing the jack in 12 days earlier had been erased.
Easy access outside
Fletcher and Brown used the smuggled tools to pry a sink and toilet unit off the wall and expose a short crawl space to an access door. Once the door was broken open, the men were out of the pod and able to crawl beneath one fence and over another. Outside, conditions also were in their favor. Because a cross support has been missing for years from a visitation gate, the two were able to scale the gate and move the top part of the fence to escape. Later, investigators found that no outside perimeter checks had been conducted for 11 days before the escape. In other parts of the jail yard, steel fence posts have rusted through at the base.
Fixing the problems
County Commission Chairwoman Nancy Harris said last week that the county dedicated $180,000 in December to fix an internal locking system at the 21-year-old jail; the system hasn't worked properly for years. She said Thursday she hadn't seen the internal report and wasn't aware of fencing or other maintenance problems. She said Hardy will share in about $550,000 in federal stimulus money that is to be used for those kinds of repairs.
County Administrator Rick Leary said the Sheriff's Office is due about $97,000 of that money and, since the escape, other municipalities in the county have agreed to chip in part of their awards to pay for jail repairs. Hardy said fencing issues have already been addressed and the cell lock repairs are nearing completion. Going forward, pat-down and other policies are being strictly enforced and training will get more emphasis. "We are ensuring our employees are doing what they are supposed to be doing," he said. With the jail director gone and the one firing, several other corrections officers have been reassigned. Maj. John Griffin, the new jail administrator who was part of the internal investigation team, has been in Hardy's administration but was once director of the Nassau County Jail.
Mee

United States

#152 Apr 22, 2012
The Palatka Corruption wrote:
Everyone responsible failed. Several officers were held accountable, and Hardy is responsible for them. It wasn't just the conditions of the jail, it was also the GROSS NEGLECT of these corrections officers who failed to follow procedure. Because of the known conditions they should have doubled their efforts to be cautious, but didn't. Hardy failed to see that his officers acted properly and I have a feeling they also lacked the training necessary to ensure safety. Too bad there isn't a state course on how to be a good sheriff.
Here's the full outline in case you missed it;

Cascade of errors led to Putnam jail break
Sheriff accepts responsibility, vows to clean up problems
DANA TREEN
Morris News Service
Published Monday, June 15, 2009

For 12 days, the smuggled jack Timothy Wayne Fletcher and Doni Ray Brown used to tear through a wall and escape the Putnam County jail rested unnoticed above their cell door. For years, rust chewed at the perimeter fencing the two inmates scaled or crawled under on the way to a murderous jail break. Fence sections were broken or missing critical support members, making them easy to breach. And in the final day before the escape, lax security let Fletcher and Brown pull together the last pieces of a plan that gave them hours of head start on a three-day spree across the Southeast before being recaptured. In a six-volume internal report, Putnam County Sheriff's Office investigators chronicle the deep security problems and deteriorating conditions that contributed to the April escape. Sheriff Jeff Hardy said he accepts responsibility for the escape and is making fixes and has tightened policies. "It seems to me there has been a breakdown in practices," said the sheriff who won election to the office in the fall. On June 3 he released findings of the internal investigation, announcing the disciplining of seven staffers, the reassignment of an eighth and the jail director's resignation. "There's a lot of human error here," he said Friday. In December the Putnam County Commission committed money to fix chronic problems with cell locks. Since the escape, federal stimulus money will be dedicated to other repairs and the Sheriff's Office is applying for grant money to pay for a video visitation system that will improve security. While those changes are in the works, many weren't in place in mid-April. Fletcher, 25, and Brown, 23, have been charged with murder in the slaying of Fletcher's step-grandmother, Helen Key Googe, 66, who likely died before a guard doing cell checks at the jail miles away noticed the men were gone.
No pat-downs
After their arrests, the men told detectives they were out of the jail at 2 a.m. April 15. They weren't missed until three hours later. Internal investigation interviews with jail supervisors and officers show that for years inmates coming back from court weren't patted down for contraband, and the major in charge of the jail said she wasn't aware that inmates weren't being searched. Maj. Paula Carter, who resigned a day before the report was concluded, told internal affairs investigators the reasoning she was given was that inmates were considered to be in uninterrupted and secure custody to and from court. The policy to search inmates when they came back to jail had been dropped years ago, investigators learned. The oversight was a linchpin in the escape, allowing Fletcher to somehow grab a bottle jack from its cubbyhole in a transport van and smuggle it into the jail on April 2. He had been wearing a cast on his left leg, which helped hide the tool. Inside the jail the squat, powerful jack was hidden above and behind an overhead fixture in front of the cell he and Brown shared. Although it was a clever hiding spot, Hardy said it should have been found.
Hmm
Mee

United States

#153 Apr 22, 2012
The Palatka Corruption wrote:
Shared cell
At the same time, a policy designed to keep inmates such as Brown and Fletcher in separate cells because they faced charges in the same case wasn't followed. An order to keep them apart was somehow dropped when Fletcher was transferred to the Clay County jail for a day in March. When he returned, he was allowed to bunk with Brown. With the jack smuggled into the jail, the two men also needed to be sure they could buy time once they escaped. A lax policy on what inmates are allowed to keep in their cells may have helped them collect the bedding and other material to fashion dummy bodies that fooled a guard at least twice during nighttime bed checks. Inmates who say they were missing clothing, bedding or other items were given those things without backup checks, investigators found. In a cleanup after the escape, bins of sheets, clothes and other items inmates weren't supposed to have were removed from cells. In videotapes of the bed checks the night of the escape, guard Leland Evans can be seen shining a flashlight briefly into the men's corner cell and not noticing they were gone. Evans, who was fired, told investigators a burned out light above the cell made it difficult to see inside but said he saw what he thought was Brown's hand. The final piece of the escape came together about 14 hours before the breakout. On another trip back from the courthouse Fletcher smuggled a second piece of the jack - the handle - past a booking desk, into a holding cell and into the jail pod. Taped by video cameras, Fletcher can be seen adjusting a baggy jail uniform to keep the handle hidden. Later that day, surveillance tape shows Brown retrieving the jack from its hiding place and taking it into the cell. Surveillance of Fletcher bringing the jack in 12 days earlier had been erased.
Easy access outside
Fletcher and Brown used the smuggled tools to pry a sink and toilet unit off the wall and expose a short crawl space to an access door. Once the door was broken open, the men were out of the pod and able to crawl beneath one fence and over another. Outside, conditions also were in their favor. Because a cross support has been missing for years from a visitation gate, the two were able to scale the gate and move the top part of the fence to escape. Later, investigators found that no outside perimeter checks had been conducted for 11 days before the escape. In other parts of the jail yard, steel fence posts have rusted through at the base.
Fixing the problems
County Commission Chairwoman Nancy Harris said last week that the county dedicated $180,000 in December to fix an internal locking system at the 21-year-old jail; the system hasn't worked properly for years. She said Thursday she hadn't seen the internal report and wasn't aware of fencing or other maintenance problems. She said Hardy will share in about $550,000 in federal stimulus money that is to be used for those kinds of repairs.
County Administrator Rick Leary said the Sheriff's Office is due about $97,000 of that money and, since the escape, other municipalities in the county have agreed to chip in part of their awards to pay for jail repairs. Hardy said fencing issues have already been addressed and the cell lock repairs are nearing completion. Going forward, pat-down and other policies are being strictly enforced and training will get more emphasis. "We are ensuring our employees are doing what they are supposed to be doing," he said. With the jail director gone and the one firing, several other corrections officers have been reassigned. Maj. John Griffin, the new jail administrator who was part of the internal investigation team, has been in Hardy's administration but was once director of the Nassau County Jail.
I said Hardy is good people and is doing a fine job. This is all about the people he placed in admin and some people don't like the people that he placed there. I'm right?

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#154 Apr 22, 2012
Hardy accepts responsibility - a day late and a dollar short, as usual. There are so many things they've screwed up, which I hold to lack of knowledge and training, the battle of egos, and sometimes just plain laziness. Not to mention drug use, graft and corruption. We need a sheriff that is PRO-ACTIVE, not reactive. I want a sheriff that makes it his business to find out what the problems are and correct them, not wait until something awful occurs, then try to figure out what to do. Only an ignorant moron living under a rock would fail to see Putnam has some VERY serious issues that need to be addressed. Hardy doesn't appear to be able to handle it, as his past record clearly shows.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#155 Apr 22, 2012
Mee wrote:
<quoted text>
I said Hardy is good people and is doing a fine job. This is all about the people he placed in admin and some people don't like the people that he placed there. I'm right?
Hardy may be good people, but I honestly don't understand how anyone can say that he's done a fine job. Or even an okay job. Surely you're aware, from reading the various posts, newspapers, watching the news, etc. of what's been going on and how these many issues were poorly handled, not addressed until after the fact - and then it seems most of it is attempted to be kept hush-hush. As for his admin., that was his choice. While I don't know any of them, the record of their deeds speaks for itself.
votevotevote

Palatka, FL

#156 Apr 22, 2012
OH NO, it's back!!!!! This is what it is all about, some moron bashing the Sheriff's Office. Appearantly they have nothing better to do.

Keep up the great work, Sheriff Hardy.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#157 Apr 22, 2012
votevotevote wrote:
OH NO, it's back!!!!! This is what it is all about, some moron bashing the Sheriff's Office. Appearantly they have nothing better to do.
Keep up the great work, Sheriff Hardy.
Call me whatever you want, it doesn't change the sorry state of this county. or it's 'leaders'. Only the election and informed voters will do that.
votevotevote

Palatka, FL

#158 Apr 22, 2012
The Palatka Corruption wrote:
<quoted text>
Call me whatever you want, it doesn't change the sorry state of this county. or it's 'leaders'. Only the election and informed voters will do that.
I just call it as I see it, just like you say you have been doing.

This is how I see it. Keep up the great work Sheriff Hardy.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#159 Apr 22, 2012
And I notice while I've been gone for 3 weeks doing better things, you are still lurking around here doing the same thing.
votevotevote

Palatka, FL

#160 Apr 22, 2012
Not me, you must have me confused with someone else. Not that I really care about the BS gossip you are providing, I do think it is on the funny side because I know the good people of Putnam County see through all your BS. I know it is your agenda to discredit the Sheriff's Office, PPD and the State Attorney's Office. You are just a little confused person. GET HELP, you really need it.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#161 Apr 22, 2012
My opinion is "calling it as I see it", the rest is documented. Tell us what these "great" and "fine" things are that have been done, because I'm sure missing it. Whenever something negative is said the response is name calling to the poster, not a legitimate rebuttal or an offering of any good deeds accomplished, so tell us of these. What makes your candidate worthy?

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#162 Apr 22, 2012
votevotevote wrote:
Not me, you must have me confused with someone else. Not that I really care about the BS gossip you are providing, I do think it is on the funny side because I know the good people of Putnam County see through all your BS. I know it is your agenda to discredit the Sheriff's Office, PPD and the State Attorney's Office. You are just a little confused person. GET HELP, you really need it.
Boy, are you sadly mistaken. And too ignorant to know any better.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Putnam County Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Long live Thu Observer 1
Who will be Sheriff in 2016? Mar 29 Ken Guthrey 4
News Putnam County sheriff's son arrested (Apr '13) Mar 28 Zzzzzzz 7
Any Complaints about Judge Dupont? (Sep '12) Mar '15 Sure it is 61
Palatka City Manager (Jul '13) Feb '15 Observer 12
Palatka City Manager Fired... Feb '15 Observer 1
sorry dad's Feb '15 madashell 1
More from around the web