Confined-feeding bill moves ahead

Confined-feeding bill moves ahead

There are 31 comments on the The Indianapolis Star story from Jan 16, 2008, titled Confined-feeding bill moves ahead. In it, The Indianapolis Star reports that:

Indiana's large livestock farms would face annual inspections and other tightened regulations under a bill given initial approval by a House committee.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Indianapolis Star.

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roundgrove

United States

#1 Jan 16, 2008
There are very few recommendations which come from Dems that I agree with, but this is one. Certainly we need to give IDEM the tools & personnel they need to adequately monitor what is happening in these large confined feeding operations. And, no, I am not a "city-slicker" who knows nothing about what it takes to raise a pound of beef or pork, but I am a country boy who sees what is happening in some of these operations.
T- Jefferson

Palatine, IL

#2 Jan 16, 2008
The largest and most dangerous 'confined feeding' operation continues unabated. The hogs feeding in the statehouse continue to eat the proceeds of productive people and then they spread their manure all over the state, to the detriment of all decent folks.
In My Sights

Williamsport, IN

#3 Jan 16, 2008
roundgrove wrote:
There are very few recommendations which come from Dems that I agree with, but this is one. Certainly we need to give IDEM the tools & personnel they need to adequately monitor what is happening in these large confined feeding operations. And, no, I am not a "city-slicker" who knows nothing about what it takes to raise a pound of beef or pork, but I am a country boy who sees what is happening in some of these operations.
I agree with your statement, especially "need to adequately monitor" and I would add "fairly". It seems that in some areas, there is more pressure to unfairly regulate producers. We must also realize that the "good producers" far outweigh the "bad actors". However, it is the "bad actors" that are shown in the papers more often.
Los Lobos

Reston, VA

#4 Jan 16, 2008
T- Jefferson wrote:
The largest and most dangerous 'confined feeding' operation continues unabated. The hogs feeding in the statehouse continue to eat the proceeds of productive people and then they spread their manure all over the state, to the detriment of all decent folks.
good one, even if you are an il-lyin-eye
T- Jefferson

Palatine, IL

#5 Jan 16, 2008
Los Lobos wrote:
<quoted text>
good one, even if you are an il-lyin-eye
I'm a hoosier, but my server is an il-lyin-eye!
supporter

Indianapolis, IN

#7 Jan 16, 2008
Yo, IndyStar! What is the bill number for those of us who would like to monitor the progress and/our contact our legislators????
Toxins in U

AOL

#8 Jan 16, 2008
Liberal Tammy wrote:
More goverment regulation that will drive prices up for the consumer. If a farmer is not breaking the law, the government has no business on his property.
Then you must love that the Bush administration has been doing its best to remove all regulations protecting consumers from poisoning by various means. Anything to increase the profits for multi-national corporations.

Please have a double helping.
jsay

AOL

#9 Jan 16, 2008
I also want to know the bill number - shame on AP for leaving that out!
HogDung

Brownsburg, IN

#10 Jan 16, 2008
Liberal Tammy wrote:
More goverment regulation that will drive prices up for the consumer. If a farmer is not breaking the law, the government has no business on his property.
Yeah because the current regulations (inspect once every 5 years) is really going to keep those that are breaking the laws in check. What about the neighbors, and by that I mean the farmers who have lived there all of their lives, who have to deal with the neverending stink, big truck traffic, and lost of property value due to an out-of-state feed company talking one farmer into being the puppet?

If they are going to allow them then yes at least annual inspections are necessary. Three violations period should end the operation not give them a clean slate after 24 months. And increased fees of which a portion needs to be set aside for further clean-up of the mess they are making.
HogDung

Brownsburg, IN

#11 Jan 16, 2008
In My Sights wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree with your statement, especially "need to adequately monitor" and I would add "fairly". It seems that in some areas, there is more pressure to unfairly regulate producers. We must also realize that the "good producers" far outweigh the "bad actors". However, it is the "bad actors" that are shown in the papers more often.
And how many of these "good" producers actually are willing to put this operation in the own back yard? Most have property far from their own house in which they put up these stink holes so they don't have to endure the constant stench or risk their own private well. Why is that? It is easy to say that this is a farming operation in a rural area but most of these factories are not on the homestead of the operator because they don't want to have to deal with the issues. They will gladly move it 3 or 4 miles away (outside the stink ring) and let the neighbors surrounding the CAFO deal with the dialy joy.
HogDung

Brownsburg, IN

#12 Jan 16, 2008
Hey In My Sights, how close to the location of the new Ice Mountain spring is the nearest CAFO there in Williamsport (home of the state's tallest waterfall)?
HogDung

Brownsburg, IN

#13 Jan 16, 2008
For the people who can't or won't look it up:

HB1168

but a better one is

SB0061

this allows for the commission to do their research (something they should have done prior to approving the first one).
Matt

Elwood, IN

#14 Jan 16, 2008
Who cares? Gimme my steak and pork!
outside the box

Deputy, IN

#15 Jan 16, 2008
Why is an issue like this a "party line" matter?

We would have better food and healthier farming communities if CAFOs were eliminated and farmers actually farmed again.

Since: Nov 07

Noblesville Indiana

#16 Jan 16, 2008
I have got to look into this. Frankly I am not up to speed but the bulk of the complaints seem to be related to the smell and the animal waste.

Why are these facilities not hooked up to sewage treatment facilities and the waste not better contained?

As I said... not my area... but engineering and technology should be able to clear a little of this up, one would think. It would come at a cost though.
blackhawk

United States

#17 Jan 16, 2008
seems to me that this should be a win-win...
IF you are a responsible operator, less stopping you from operating. the common sense regulations in exchange for the right to run a business...
whats wrong with that?

liberal tammy? ever hear saint reagan use the phrase 'trust but verify'??? loser.
Dennis_Daviess Co

United States

#18 Jan 16, 2008
T- Jefferson wrote:
The largest and most dangerous 'confined feeding' operation continues unabated. The hogs feeding in the statehouse continue to eat the proceeds of productive people and then they spread their manure all over the state, to the detriment of all decent folks.
You couldn't have said it any better than that. And the bad part of it is, it is true.
Dennis_Daviess Co

United States

#19 Jan 16, 2008
Being a past farm boy myself. I do not see why they need these things anyway. They are cruel to the animals that live in them and it is a wonder there is not more sick animals in those places than there are. It's sicking to walk thru one.
HogDung

Brownsburg, IN

#20 Jan 17, 2008
INDY-RN wrote:
I have got to look into this. Frankly I am not up to speed but the bulk of the complaints seem to be related to the smell and the animal waste.
Why are these facilities not hooked up to sewage treatment facilities and the waste not better contained?
As I said... not my area... but engineering and technology should be able to clear a little of this up, one would think. It would come at a cost though.
Those are 2 complaints (smell and sewage) as well as the huge lost of property value for the CAFO's neighbors. Another concern is the quality of meat that is being produced, which is poor. They have to load these animals up with anti-bodies and steroids in order to keep them "healthy" enough to survive the conditions in those buildings. This is not a good thing for the public. Yes it brings "cheaper" meat to the market but not by that much versus free-range animals that aren't doped up to grow bigger and faster and crammed into a pin with 25 other animals with barely enough room to move. All of this so these corporations can turn the almighty dollar.
In My Sights

Williamsport, IN

#21 Jan 17, 2008
HogDung wrote:
Hey In My Sights, how close to the location of the new Ice Mountain spring is the nearest CAFO there in Williamsport (home of the state's tallest waterfall)?
The Ice Mountain spring is in a part of the county that is not applicable to CAFO's, so there is no worry there. Most of our facililites, that are regulated, checked and work properly are in the "prairie" areas (or flat lands) which are better suited for large buildings.

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