Mental Health Courts Program set to s...

Mental Health Courts Program set to start in Craighead County

There are 15 comments on the KAIT-TV Jonesboro story from Mar 3, 2011, titled Mental Health Courts Program set to start in Craighead County. In it, KAIT-TV Jonesboro reports that:

JONESBORO, AR "I'm just really excited about this. It could do a lot of good. It could save families, it could save jail space, it could save money," said Craighead County Sheriff, Jack McCann.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at KAIT-TV Jonesboro.

the cycle continues

United States

#1 Mar 3, 2011
who would have thought?? A new grant===new opportunity for milking the system while severing ties to old programs that are not as profitable!!!
Look at who is getting the grant $ to "assist" the mentally ill folks reintegrate successfully into society.... isnt that what MSHS told the public when they started the transitional units that so many jobs are being eliminated/combined/reduced etc....
umm hmmm

United States

#2 Mar 3, 2011
COME ON KAIT!!!- tell us how many hundred$ of thousand$ in "free money" it's going to cost us trying to rehab 10 criminals with mental problems.
how many of their apts does mshs plan to rent to these clients?
mr sheriff - are these criminals going to be guarded 24/7 by mshs like those at the crisis and forensic units?
why the heck not!

are we expected to believe the all mighty mshs is going to CURE them in one year? umm hmmm.
how has their track record been with the crisis unit and their long term criminal unit? if mshs can afford this, they should be able to keep a group crisis unit open. what are they for? what's the difference? more money for mshs? umm hmmm

why is this news? haven't judges been referring them to mshs for years? what's the cost for this new program vs the old way of doing things? exactly how is this program any better?
keeping mental criminals on the loose and out of jail is a good idea? umm hmmm

if the service center is closing - where are those and these criminals going? umm hmmm, i might get me some more of them taters! umm hmmm
guest

Jonesboro, AR

#3 Mar 3, 2011
Sounds like a great program. Branding people 'criminals' should become a thing of the past. We have learned that mental illness is not the fault of the mentally ill. We need to learn that it is criminal acts that are wrong, not necessarily the people who commit a crime. I don't know many people from any walk of life that haven't committed a violation of a criminal law at some point in their life. But it is usually the poor that receive the lifetime brand. We say we are a Christian nation. Time to start acting like it.
confucious say

Jonesboro, AR

#4 Mar 3, 2011
If they are mentally ill and have committed crimes please release them and send them to your neighborhood and we will pray for ya.
guest

Jonesboro, AR

#5 Mar 3, 2011
confucious say wrote:
If they are mentally ill and have committed crimes please release them and send them to your neighborhood and we will pray for ya.
But the point of this program isn't just to release them. It is to see that they are not a worry to themselves or others when in fact they are released.
just saying

Jonesboro, AR

#6 Mar 3, 2011
The mshs forensic unit has had plans to build for a while now and will do so this year. If any one has ever worked with those who have been acquitted of their crimes by reason of insanity then you would know that these people were truly not responsible for their crimes. And btw I am not referring to the tv version of the insanity plea. I am referred to those who are truly clinically mentally ill. Such as paranoid schizophrenia. The majority of these people have had their first break (early to mid twenties) and have not had mental health services. Once on medication they are able to function successfully in society. I know the mentally ill have received a stigma in society but it is just that-a stigma or stereotype. Many times this stereotype is what keeps them from getting help in the first place.
and

United States

#7 Mar 3, 2011
guest wrote:
<quoted text>
But the point of this program isn't just to release them. It is to see that they are not a worry to themselves or others when in fact they are released.
how are you going to make sure they stay on their meds? explain it to their next victim. oops?
guest

Jonesboro, AR

#8 Mar 3, 2011
and wrote:
<quoted text>how are you going to make sure they stay on their meds? explain it to their next victim. oops?
Similar to drug court, McCann says some non-violent offenders living with mental health issues will be able to enter this program in lieu of jail time. He adds it's a commitment with rules to follow.

"If they don't, they can be kicked out of the program and sent back to jail," said McCann.

"We want to reduce recidivism among persons with mental illness."

It sounds like a very structured program. People are screened and selected based on whether they can benefit from the program. That's the point. If you don't want another victim put them in this program. If you just warehouse them in jail then you are more likely to get another victim when they are released not having received help for their issues.
confucious say

Jonesboro, AR

#9 Mar 3, 2011
I have a family member who is "mentally ill" and we have struggled for years trying to get this person to take meds correctly...not to sell them...not to participate in illegal activities...including use of illegal drugs. There isn't much hope as far as I am concerned, unless they have the desire to do the right thing, which in most cases they do not. But hooray and praise be to the ones who do...but the government or churches cant do it...only they can. Call me a pessimist if you will, but I prefer to look at it as reality.
and

United States

#10 Mar 3, 2011
guest wrote:
<quoted text>
Similar to drug court, McCann says some non-violent offenders living with mental health issues will be able to enter this program in lieu of jail time. He adds it's a commitment with rules to follow.
"If they don't, they can be kicked out of the program and sent back to jail," said McCann.
"We want to reduce recidivism among persons with mental illness."
It sounds like a very structured program. People are screened and selected based on whether they can benefit from the program. That's the point. If you don't want another victim put them in this program. If you just warehouse them in jail then you are more likely to get another victim when they are released not having received help for their issues.
you think spending 100k+ on them in a year is going to cure them?
how are you going to make sure they stay on their meds? explain it to their next victim. oops?
guest

Jonesboro, AR

#11 Mar 3, 2011
and wrote:
<quoted text>you think spending 100k+ on them in a year is going to cure them?
how are you going to make sure they stay on their meds? explain it to their next victim. oops?
$100,000+? Money isn't what cures or at least helps mental illness. Treatment does that. Again I repeat, it is a structured program and I'm sure compliance with their medical regimen is part of seeing that they are following the rules. Sorry one poster's family experience with mental illness has been so negative. But every case is different. Better to send money on treatment and reduce recidivism than to spend it on warehousing. Jail usually only exacerbates mental issues. Also, again, if you want further victims just incarcerate them and give them no help behind bars. This is a guarantee of further victims. Note the poster that seems to be mental health professional points out we are talking about people who are seriously ill. As a member of the community, I am very thankful that the community's leaders have the intelligence and compassion to champion these types of programs.
the cycle continues

United States

#12 Mar 4, 2011
guest wrote:
<quoted text>
Similar to drug court, McCann says some non-violent offenders living with mental health issues will be able to enter this program in lieu of jail time. He adds it's a commitment with rules to follow.
"If they don't, they can be kicked out of the program and sent back to jail," said McCann.
"We want to reduce recidivism among persons with mental illness."
It sounds like a very structured program. People are screened and selected based on whether they can benefit from the program. That's the point. If you don't want another victim put them in this program. If you just warehouse them in jail then you are more likely to get another victim when they are released not having received help for their issues.
I believe people are questioning the ability of mshs to EFFECTIVELY provide the necessary services to this population NOT the program. With all the problems they seem to be having with terminations, loss of location, disgruntled staff, etc.etc. it would seem that the public would have a reason to question. I wonder what the recidivism rate is for the transitional unit and crisis unit patients is, how many revocations have there been after those clients were "carefully screeneed" by mshs, any escapes,any if those offenders go o to have another victim????
imo

United States

#13 Mar 4, 2011
guest wrote:
<quoted text>
$100,000+? Money isn't what cures or at least helps mental illness. Treatment does that. Again I repeat, it is a structured program and I'm sure compliance with their medical regimen is part of seeing that they are following the rules. Sorry one poster's family experience with mental illness has been so negative. But every case is different. Better to send money on treatment and reduce recidivism than to spend it on warehousing. Jail usually only exacerbates mental issues. Also, again, if you want further victims just incarcerate them and give them no help behind bars. This is a guarantee of further victims. Note the poster that seems to be mental health professional points out we are talking about people who are seriously ill. As a member of the community, I am very thankful that the community's leaders have the intelligence and compassion to champion these types of programs.
if they are criminals, they should be treated in jail or in a lock down unit somewhere. thats what mshs trans unit was for. it's closing. where is mshs going to treat them? are these criminal mental patients going to be put up in an apartment and wandering around free?
if medicaid is footing the bill for some or all of this, no wonder we're broke. i have a feeling most folks would be pissed to learn how much per day mshs does and will bill for "treatment".
lets have a toast

United States

#14 Mar 4, 2011
let's raise our glasses & have a toast to MSHS, may the screwing over you have given to others be given back to you a hundred times over . enjoy!!!
double to the those who think they are never wrong
huh

United States

#15 Mar 5, 2011
just saying wrote:
The mshs forensic unit has had plans to build for a while now and will do so this year. If any one has ever worked with those who have been acquitted of their crimes by reason of insanity then you would know that these people were truly not responsible for their crimes. And btw I am not referring to the tv version of the insanity plea. I am referred to those who are truly clinically mentally ill. Such as paranoid schizophrenia. The majority of these people have had their first break (early to mid twenties) and have not had mental health services. Once on medication they are able to function successfully in society. I know the mentally ill have received a stigma in society but it is just that-a stigma or stereotype. Many times this stereotype is what keeps them from getting help in the first place.
I dont thinl most people are objecting to helping the mentally ill in any manner that will be of benefit to themand the public. I think most are concerned with mshs track record that they are the ones being charged with assistung these people. It would seem that once grant money is gone so are they. They (mshs) dont seem to be able to look past the last installment of money; planning for the future to keep from loss of jobs and services to those that have been loyal (NOT snitches and brwon nosers) beleived in what they were doing was making a difference to those in need . How long will this program last? I'd wager til they have taken all they can from the system and then it will likely be mass terminationfor thir idea of "cause" and the patients will be sent o jail and back to ASH. History and insanity repeat themselves when behaviors and attitudes do not change.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Craighead County Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Slideshow: July 3 - 9 mug shots Jul 4 Guest 2
News Graphic Content: Dogs found in poor condition, ... Jun '16 Mike 2
News Group's efforts to help mentally ill merit praise Jun '16 Concerned 5
News Police: EMT pulls knife on first responder (Apr '15) May '16 Guest 12
News Craighead County sued over court fees Apr '16 fornicator 3
News JPD: 17-year-old held on attempted murder charge Mar '16 Kelly F 1
News SLIDESHOW: March 13-19 mug shots Mar '16 Kelly F 1
More from around the web