Greene County School Board Approves Allergy Management Policy - NBC29 WVIR Charlottesville, VA Ne...

The Greene County School Board has approved a new allergy management policy following the death of a Chesterfield County first-grader from a severe peanut allergy attack. Full Story
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The nut case

United States

#1 Feb 29, 2012
While this article mentions the items brought into the school by individuals it mentions nothing about the food served by the school cafiteria.

further it mentions an extremely high number of students with allergies. While there are individuals with severe allergies i question the numbers since that is a very high percentage of the youth population in the county sounding as if it is an unverified "fact".
Parent of 4

Charlottesville, VA

#2 Feb 29, 2012
You can never be too safe when it comes to children. This is a job very well done on the part of the Greene County School system.
NutAllergyMom

Palmyra, VA

#3 Feb 29, 2012
I know this article is lacking full information of the policy but... "The allergy management policy states students and teachers are only allowed to bring in packaged foods with labels that clearly list the ingredients." - this doesn't solve the problem.

I'm a parent of a child with a peanut allergy. In-depth education of the seriousness of it is essential. Most educators have gotten a 30 minute or less in-service of what to look for and how to administer an epi-pen which is NOT enough. Pre-packaged foods are just as dangerous as the vast majority of factory/pre-packaged food are processed on equipment that process nut products as well.

My daughter is anaphylactic ... its scary ... she's too young and irresponsible to carry the Epi on her person. There is one in the classroom and one in the office, but its not with her at all times or in the cafeteria. Although packages read "MAY" contain - its too high of a risk. Food shopping is over-whelming and variety doesn't change much.

Schools and parents should be made aware and forever conscious of possible allergies and communicate with their schools and classroom teachers. I know every month my daughters classroom celebrates birthdays for that month... every first friday of the month I know I'm bring her cupcakes I made from scratch... I have to stay ontop of things constantly. In-depth education, refreshers/in-services & communication go a very long way and the only way to pull this off effectively.

Also, being former EMS I'm concerned... the difficulty comes from the device (DRUG) being used erroniously - while a serious allergic reaction can be life threatening it is not the only thing that can present as labored breathing, diminished mental capacity, severe anxiety and loss of conciousness. To a lay-person a choking victim or a person having either a stroke or a heart attack could appear to be having a reaction - in all of these cases the epi injection would be more harm than good for the person in trouble. Another concern, most have the mentality/concept these types of things only happen to adults.

There is a lot more that goes into this, more thought, legal issues than changing a policy and much more expensive than reported here.
Waitng

Galax, VA

#4 Feb 29, 2012
The policy should also require a form from the child's allergist that clearly defines the child's allergies and treatment. Food allergies can be lifevthreatening and should be treated as a serious issue. I would guess most of us know at least 1 parent who has lied about food allergies in their child. This leads many people to discount the issue when someone genuinely has the problem.
Hello

Farmville, VA

#5 Mar 1, 2012
Just curious....and I'm trying to open a can of worms without stating my opinion....at what point does the guarantee of public education outweigh the liberties of the other 99.9% of kids in the school? I.e. why should parents have to exclude lots of foods from their child's diet because it 'may contain peanuts' because of 1-2 students?
Just curious.....I mean, why should the school require this when allergies could be picked up from just walking outside a 5-Guys (where they have peanuts) or sitting next to someone on a bus who ate peanuts. Should we ban peanuts?
torch

Charlottesville, VA

#6 Mar 1, 2012
So does this mean they are going to go through our kids lunch bags everyday?
torch

Charlottesville, VA

#7 Mar 1, 2012
Im not buying packaged only msg gmo foods for my kid to go to school
Sue

United States

#8 Mar 1, 2012
Hello wrote:
Just curious....and I'm trying to open a can of worms without stating my opinion....at what point does the guarantee of public education outweigh the liberties of the other 99.9% of kids in the school? I.e. why should parents have to exclude lots of foods from their child's diet because it 'may contain peanuts' because of 1-2 students?
Just curious.....I mean, why should the school require this when allergies could be picked up from just walking outside a 5-Guys (where they have peanuts) or sitting next to someone on a bus who ate peanuts. Should we ban peanuts?
I was thinking the same thing. How much can teachers and educators be expected to do when schools are full of children who have all kinds of special issues. Can they be expected to learn all about allergies, ADD, depression, autism, OCD and God knows how many different things so many children may be dealing with. It's not that I'm unsympathetic, but really, how can you expect a teacher to be totally knowledgable of each and every students special requirements? Aren't their jobs tough enough?
heh

Charlottesville, VA

#9 Mar 1, 2012
Sue wrote:
<quoted text>
I was thinking the same thing. How much can teachers and educators be expected to do when schools are full of children who have all kinds of special issues. Can they be expected to learn all about allergies, ADD, depression, autism, OCD and God knows how many different things so many children may be dealing with. It's not that I'm unsympathetic, but really, how can you expect a teacher to be totally knowledgable of each and every students special requirements? Aren't their jobs tough enough?
It won't be in the too distant future when tests similar to amniocentesis will identify all abnormalities, precluding anyone's rights being trampled on.
Fire All IncomptntTechurs

Charlottesville, VA

#10 Mar 1, 2012
I'm allergic to overpaid so-called teachers who are completely unable to teach, so they get their union thugs to force even more pay raises and tax me to death! Can I get them removed from the school too?
Starter

Charlottesville, VA

#11 Mar 1, 2012
A child COULD die, there are no human rights that over ride the protection of a childs life. I understand that it may not be fair to ask some one not to bring a certain food just because of someone elses need but really, honestly ask yourself would you want to risk taking the life of a child over it? It's just food, they are not asking you to give up your first born.
Disillusioned

Charlottesville, VA

#12 Mar 1, 2012
At what point does society have to stop altering the lifestyle of the majority to satisfy the needs of a very slim minority?

I'm very sympathetic to "NutAllergyMom"'s situation and the severity of her child's allergy -- that is horrifying and terrible. However, perhaps there are times when it is best to remove the child from a situation instead of expecting others to change their lifestyle so drastically. If this measure does not go far enough as you've said, then how far should they go? And if another child is allergic to florescent lights, for instance, does the school have to switch all the lighting at taxpayers' expense? This is a slippery slope -- I can only imagine what could be next. I just do not believe our schools and students should be subjected to such a liability.
Seriously

Ruckersville, VA

#13 Mar 1, 2012
Does bringing cupcakes to school really classify as a lifestyle? I can see it now..."Yeah, Susie was always like that. I remember when she began living that lifestyle, having her mom bring cupcakes to school for her birthday every year. She really went downhill from there!"

I mean seriously...is preventing the possibility of KILLING A CHILD too much of a lifestyle change for you?
Disillusioned wrote:
At what point does society have to stop altering the lifestyle of the majority to satisfy the needs of a very slim minority?
I'm very sympathetic to "NutAllergyMom"'s situation and the severity of her child's allergy -- that is horrifying and terrible. However, perhaps there are times when it is best to remove the child from a situation instead of expecting others to change their lifestyle so drastically. If this measure does not go far enough as you've said, then how far should they go? And if another child is allergic to florescent lights, for instance, does the school have to switch all the lighting at taxpayers' expense? This is a slippery slope -- I can only imagine what could be next. I just do not believe our schools and students should be subjected to such a liability.
Disillusioned

Charlottesville, VA

#14 Mar 1, 2012
Seriously wrote:
Does bringing cupcakes to school really classify as a lifestyle? I can see it now..."Yeah, Susie was always like that. I remember when she began living that lifestyle, having her mom bring cupcakes to school for her birthday every year. She really went downhill from there!"
I mean seriously...is preventing the possibility of KILLING A CHILD too much of a lifestyle change for you?
<quoted text>
It's more than cupcakes and you know it. Grow up and face facts. Other states are mandating what children can take in their lunches now -- it is just a beginning.
Tit-4-Tat

Charlottesville, VA

#15 Mar 1, 2012
Disillusioned wrote:
<quoted text>
It's more than cupcakes and you know it. Grow up and face facts. Other states are mandating what children can take in their lunches now -- it is just a beginning.
You can always home school if you don't like public school rules.
It's one for all and all for one in public schools.
kidrocky

Louisa, VA

#16 Mar 1, 2012
"You can always home school if you don't like public school rules.
It's one for all and all for one in public schools"

Or we can choose to take back our schools and dictate what they will do instead of them dictating to us what they will do.
NutAllergyMom

Palmyra, VA

#17 Mar 1, 2012
Waitng wrote:
The policy should also require a form from the child's allergist that clearly defines the child's allergies and treatment. Food allergies can be lifevthreatening and should be treated as a serious issue. I would guess most of us know at least 1 parent who has lied about food allergies in their child. This leads many people to discount the issue when someone genuinely has the problem.
To the best of my knowledge, any parent that discloses an allergy to a school, there is a document (Food & allergy action plan)that is mandatory, at least in my district. It must be completed by the childs physician which details the allergy(s) and treatment in the event of exposure. Therefore, I cannot see or understand why a parent would withhold information about their childs food allergy, that's nuts & deemed in my eyes as abuse & neglect... and they certainly cannot "make up one" without medical documentation to back it up, it IS a medical condition.
frmr

Montpelier, VA

#18 Mar 1, 2012
NutAllergyMom wrote:
I know this article is lacking full information of the policy but... "The allergy management policy states students and teachers are only allowed to bring in packaged foods with labels that clearly list the ingredients." - this doesn't solve the problem.
I'm a parent of a child with a peanut allergy. In-depth education of the seriousness of it is essential. Most educators have gotten a 30 minute or less in-service of what to look for and how to administer an epi-pen which is NOT enough. Pre-packaged foods are just as dangerous as the vast majority of factory/pre-packaged food are processed on equipment that process nut products as well.
My daughter is anaphylactic ... its scary ... she's too young and irresponsible to carry the Epi on her person. There is one in the classroom and one in the office, but its not with her at all times or in the cafeteria. Although packages read "MAY" contain - its too high of a risk. Food shopping is over-whelming and variety doesn't change much.
Schools and parents should be made aware and forever conscious of possible allergies and communicate with their schools and classroom teachers. I know every month my daughters classroom celebrates birthdays for that month... every first friday of the month I know I'm bring her cupcakes I made from scratch... I have to stay ontop of things constantly. In-depth education, refreshers/in-services & communication go a very long way and the only way to pull this off effectively.
Also, being former EMS I'm concerned... the difficulty comes from the device (DRUG) being used erroniously - while a serious allergic reaction can be life threatening it is not the only thing that can present as labored breathing, diminished mental capacity, severe anxiety and loss of conciousness. To a lay-person a choking victim or a person having either a stroke or a heart attack could appear to be having a reaction - in all of these cases the epi injection would be more harm than good for the person in trouble. Another concern, most have the mentality/concept these types of things only happen to adults.
There is a lot more that goes into this, more thought, legal issues than changing a policy and much more expensive than reported here.
If you are truly this concerned over the lack of education teachers have to help your child, perhaps he/she should be homeschooled. There is simply no way a teacher can be thorougly versed in every possible medical emergency. We as teachers try very hard to do what is required of parents but we cannot be every where with each child all day.
frmr

Montpelier, VA

#19 Mar 1, 2012
Fire All IncomptntTechurs wrote:
I'm allergic to overpaid so-called teachers who are completely unable to teach, so they get their union thugs to force even more pay raises and tax me to death! Can I get them removed from the school too?
No unions in VA schools.
Hello

Farmville, VA

#20 Mar 1, 2012
I guess we need nut-free schools. If my child had an allergy, I would NEVER expect the schools to require the other students and parents to bend of for the 0.001% of student with an allergy. I'm sure most parents would do their best to exclude some foods, but you just never know if your sweater came into contact with peanut dust or if your kid's lunch meat was cross contaminated. At what point does the school have to accommodate and when not? And by school I mean students, teachers, parents, etc.

What if a student said they'd kill themself IF someone wore pink clothing again? Should the school ban pink clothing? It's a life and death situation, so makes sense to have the suicidal kid leave school, not everyone else. Ridiculous scenario, but you see my point.

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