N.M. loses electric car plant to Bay ...

N.M. loses electric car plant to Bay Area

There are 58 comments on the KOB.com Eyewitness News 4 - New Mexico story from Jun 30, 2008, titled N.M. loses electric car plant to Bay Area. In it, KOB.com Eyewitness News 4 - New Mexico reports that:

New Mexico will not be home to a new manufacturing plant for an electric-powered sedan after all, as Tesla Motors announces it will build the plant in California's Bay Area instead, according to the San ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at KOB.com Eyewitness News 4 - New Mexico.

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CornDog

Bensalem, PA

#46 Jun 30, 2008
rocky2 wrote:
Engineers out there have to sleep in their cars, sleep in their cubicles, or commute 180 miles a day (at $5 a gallon gas) inland to afford a place to live. I've visited tech firms out there and yes, there are people who sleep in their cubicles! Cracker box houses start at $800,000. I'm really not sure how companies out there recruit anyone, unless they all live with their parents.
They are a flaky company anyway. Look at their management. Would we want to spend $100 million in tax dollars and have them go belly up? That is likely to happen. Why is it hardly anybody builds cars anymore? GM, Chrysler, and Ford are shutting down plants. Toyota is doing well, but they know how to build cars that actually work.
LOL, NM is wasting millions on a Space Port of all things. Who's skinning the cat and who's holding the tail?
Mike

Bensalem, PA

#47 Jun 30, 2008
An official said, "This decision by Tesla is not surprising, given the instability of its management." That is a an absolute classic statement! "The instability of its management!"
I won't even go further!
Gene

Albuquerque, NM

#48 Jun 30, 2008
say-tsar-shah- vez wrote:
<quoted text> I guess offering up the railrunner cho choo cars after hours as employee housing didn't suffice; nor qualify as equipment. That what happens when you're bankrupt, you get kicked to the curb...
San Francisco is a nice place ... but it costs a billion to live there. Hugely expensive! These fly-by-night outfits come and go and I am feeling that the taxpayers actually saved being hosed royal by these people. A hundred-thousand-dollar electric car? Yeah, that's really going to be great? Not! It is way behind its time table and the regular car is still a dream. And the solar cell plant ... well ... let me say this about that! Until someone finds an economical method of manufacturing solar cells, they will continue to be a "tax-incentive-only" business that will dry up and blow right off the mesa as soon as the economy turns around ... with the taxpayers left hold their sacks.

When someone applies NEW technology and for-real NEW ideas to electric cars, hydrogen cars, fuel cell cars, and this solar cell boondoggle, all we are going to get are schyster schemes like those of the 70's during the oil embargos. Those all blew away, too.

Don't get me wrong. I want this stuff to work! But what I am seeing is more of the same and those were hose-jobs, too.
Rick

United States

#49 Jun 30, 2008
$100,000 electric car? That's worthless to the general public who need it the most. Let's build a $8,000 electric car, so we can get on with clean air and energy independents.
just wondering

Newport News, VA

#50 Jul 1, 2008
This is the first of many broken promises from the state and private sector. When Mesa del Sol goes in with all of the large companies that are suppose to support the info structure decide not to come, over off Bobby Foster will be a very well developed area of land that was totally turned upside down for NOTHING.
Progress is needed, but to the grandness that has been promised to the people of ABQ and NM, I just do not see it happening.
We, the residents of ABQ are going to be the ones that continue to pay for the lack of judgement that lawmakers continue to press upon us. LOVELY!!
Kathleen

Woodbridge, NJ

#51 Jul 1, 2008
Lil Bush wrote:
<quoted text>
Jersey?
On vacation.

“JUST CALL ME QUIRKY..”

Since: May 08

Burque'

#52 Jul 1, 2008
KAT C O M E H O M E LOL How is the vacation coming along. You are so lucky. I love the Ocean.
Detention Officer

Portales, NM

#53 Jul 1, 2008
Hmmmm, I wonder who got the big pay off? With the "union" problem in Calif., seems to me that the cars are going to cost alot more to produce.......so what else is new.....screw the public why some money hungry leech is probably on the beach somewhere enjoying a nice vacation .......but I guess that's normal.........The car is probably a piece of junk anyway....
Gene

Albuquerque, NM

#55 Jul 1, 2008
Rick wrote:
$100,000 electric car? That's worthless to the general public who need it the most. Let's build a $8,000 electric car, so we can get on with clean air and energy independents.
That's what I was trolling for when I said what I said. We need a guy that can build an inexpensive electric/hybrid/hydrogen/fuel- cell car ... like a modern-day Henry Ford. He didn't invent cars. Cars had been manufactured for years but were expensive as all get out ... until Henry Ford did his thing and produced a car that just about anyone could afford to buy. And, let's spend some of that government money on something besides tax incentives. Spend it on research to lower the cost of producing solar cells and raise the efficiency of the same. Than let's work on the batteries for electric cars. Right now, what's available is trailing-edge technology that has had some of the same financial speculator twix applied to them ... so your hybrid electric costs 5-times what it should.
not surprised also

Montgomery, AL

#56 Jul 2, 2008
This is when Billy was hoping to make President of USA so what now of course California is going to get the bid. Marty will not make the Hi ways wider
CornDog

Bensalem, PA

#57 Jul 2, 2008
Gene wrote:
<quoted text>
That's what I was trolling for when I said what I said. We need a guy that can build an inexpensive electric/hybrid/hydrogen/fuel- cell car ... like a modern-day Henry Ford. He didn't invent cars. Cars had been manufactured for years but were expensive as all get out ... until Henry Ford did his thing and produced a car that just about anyone could afford to buy. And, let's spend some of that government money on something besides tax incentives. Spend it on research to lower the cost of producing solar cells and raise the efficiency of the same. Than let's work on the batteries for electric cars. Right now, what's available is trailing-edge technology that has had some of the same financial speculator twix applied to them ... so your hybrid electric costs 5-times what it should.
Henry's biggest asset was his assembly line efficiency which kept costs down and he could sell cheap and still make a profit. A small profit per item with a large volume. Our society today wants to make a 100% return profit in 6 months coupled with a product that wears out at the same time the warranty (if any) expires.
nsxt

Los Alamos, NM

#59 Jul 2, 2008
lobos suck and how wrote:
...i suprised they can breath on there own...
Many of them can't write English either.
Its been 3 days, Bill and Marty should be tripping over each other to claim success at preventing a toxic battery company from moving in.
Mary

Belleville, IL

#60 Jul 2, 2008
New Mexico will never be a threat to California -it is a poorly run dirty drug infested state. I am so glad after 30 years there we are out.
Jeremy wrote:
On seconde thought the Governor of California helped with this inventive to keep Tesla in California maybe this is pay back because the film industry is really booming and has ten folded in New Mexico and I hear that Albuququerque and New Mexico is a major threat to Hollywood and Californias film business. Maye Governor Arnold did this to new Mexico because our state and city is taking away their business from the booming film industry in New Mexico. If the big one (earthquake) hit Los Angeles and California I would not be surprised if the whole Hollywood film industry relocated to Albuquerque and New Mexico.
Eugene

Albuquerque, NM

#62 Jul 16, 2008
Very disappointing decision. They may have paid decent liveable wages. Something that is nearly impossible to find in New Mexico. Many employers seem to think Albuquerque is part of Old Mexico and can pay employees in Pescos. Our license plates should read " New Mexico - Land of High Cost of Living and Third World Wages. Many other states tend to think New Mexico is not part of the United States. Resulting in the low wages. The Powers incharge in Santa Fe should seriously consider changing the states name!
Felix the Dog

Rio Rancho, NM

#63 Jul 16, 2008
evil todd wrote:
Will Chavez claim responsibility for loosing the plant? Just like how he claims that he is the one that brings companies here?
"Success has many parents, failure is an orphan."

There's a lot of political orphans in Santa Fe, except when it comes to wasting tax money.
flint and steel

Rio Rancho, NM

#64 Jul 16, 2008
lobos suck and how wrote:
cost of living is great in NM but the work force here is the absolute worst in the entire nation, just go to any store and look at the retards that work there, i suprised they can breath on there own....
And don't forget the high rejection rate of POTENTIAL (not currently hired) employees in New Mexico because they can't get past the drug test. I don't know if the Tesla Motors bosses did any research into that before deciding to leave New Mexico, but they should have.

I'm not sure what the rejection rate in Albuquerque is, but in the smaller towns in NM and for retail positions, about three out of four possible hires are rejected because they test positive for pot, meth, cocaine, and/or other illicit drugs,
flathead Ford fan

Albuquerque, NM

#65 Jul 16, 2008
Gene wrote:
<quoted text>
That's what I was trolling for when I said what I said. We need a guy that can build an inexpensive electric/hybrid/hydrogen/fuel- cell car ... like a modern-day Henry Ford. He didn't invent cars. Cars had been manufactured for years but were expensive as all get out ... until Henry Ford did his thing and produced a car that just about anyone could afford to buy. And, let's spend some of that government money on something besides tax incentives. Spend it on research to lower the cost of producing solar cells ... Than let's work on the batteries for electric cars. Right now, what's available is trailing-edge technology that has had some of the same financial speculator twix applied to them ... so your hybrid electric costs 5-times what it should.
In general I agree with your assessment, but want to bring up some points.
Decent (with reasonable electrical efficiency, mechanically robust) electric motors have been around for more than a century. Decent (see above) solid state motor controllers with enough power capacity to deal with the requirements of everyday electric cars could have been made perhaps thirty plus years ago. The real issue with electric cars FOR OVER A CENTURY has been the battery technology. The typical battery problems are, IMHO roughly decreasing order of their issues, 1) poor energy density (can't go far enough on a charge), 2) an uncompetitive cost/performance ratio, and 3) poor power density (you can use it for a golf cart doing 10 miles an hour, but not for a full size car doing 75 mph).
Lead/acid batteries used for conventional gasoline powered cars fail at issue #1. Lithium-ion and nickel metal hydride batteries fail with issue #2, but prices of those could drop with more production. Fuel cells typically fail with both issues #2 and #3, and those that are acceptable for #3 currently lose big time for issue #2.
Unfortunately solar cells still fail at issue #2, in spite of years of work for the the military and telecommunication satellite industries. And due to the diffuse and variable nature of sunlight, covering a vehicle with solar cells would quickly fail at #3, too
Right now hydrogen has proponents for use in fuel cell powered electric cars (and conventional piston powered cars too). The hydrogen issue won't be a starter until somebody wants to put up front money for its distribution to everybody's neighborhood - and I don't see the conventional oil companies, let alone anybody else, talking about this.
What i suggest for electric (not hybrid) cars is a two way power setup. Use a storage battery that can be recharged off conventional A/C power, and a fuel cell for long distance - high speed travel, and charging the storage battery when possible. I suggest the use of a methane powered fuel cell, examples which seem to be lab curiosities now and which hopefully can be made cost-competitive.
Note: I said "methane" above, not "natural gas," with the latter implying it's a fossil fuel that comes from a well. Methane can come from a variety of sources, including the outgassing from local waste dumps, sewage treatment plants, cows, and the fermentation of waste biomasss with the right enzymes and/or microbes. I suggest the use of methane in fuel cells for electric cars because the distribution of its natural gas twin is already set up. I live two miles out of town, and yet natural gas for my hot water and winter heat is piped right to my house.
And what about taxing the "fuel" for electric vehicles? Recharging an electric car at home will probably look less competitive if you have to pay the equivalent fuel taxes currently applied on gasoline or diesel for cars/trucks, and on just that fraction used for the vehicle. Ditto for hydrogen, natural gas, solar cell recharging, etc... You think the guvmint won't put "road" taxes on whatever the source of the electricity for electricity?_I'LL_ bet you it'll happen....
flathead Ford fan

Albuquerque, NM

#66 Jul 16, 2008
Gene wrote:
<quoted text>
That's what I was trolling for.... We need a guy that can build an inexpensive electric/hybrid/hydrogen/fuel- cell car ... like a modern-day Henry Ford. He didn't invent cars. Cars had been manufactured for years but were expensive ... until Henry Ford did his thing and produced a car that just about anyone could afford to buy. And, let's spend some of that government money on something besides tax incentives. Spend it on research to lower the cost of producing solar cells .... Than let's work on the batteries for electric cars. Right now, what's available is trailing-edge technology that has had some of the same ... twix applied to them ... so your hybrid electric costs 5-times what it should.
In general I agree with you, but want to bring up some points.

Decent (reasonably efficient, and mechanically robust) electric motors have been around for more than a century. Decent (see above) solid state motor controllers with enough power capacity to deal with the requirements of everyday electric cars could have been made perhaps thirty+ years ago. The real problem with electric cars FOR OVER A CENTURY has been the battery technology. The typical battery problems, IMHO roughly in decreasing order, are 1) poor energy density (can't go far enough on a charge), 2) an uncompetitive price/performance ratio, and 3) poor power density (you can use it for a golf cart at 10 miles an hour, but not for a full size car at 75 mph).

Lead/acid batteries used for starting gas cars fail at issue #1. Lithium-ion and nickel metal hydride batteries fail with issue #2, but prices of those could drop with more production. Fuel cells typically fail with both issues #2 and #3, and those that are acceptable for #3 currently lose big time for issue #2.

Unfortunately solar cells still fail at issue #2, in spite of years of work for the the military and commercial satellite industries. With the diffuse and variable nature of sunlight, covering a vehicle with solar cells would fail at #3, too

Right now hydrogen has proponents for use in fuel cell powered electric cars (and conventional ones too). The hydrogen issue won't be a starter until somebody wants to put up front money for its distribution to everybody's neighborhood - and I don't see the conventional oil companies, let alone anybody else, putting the $ where the mouth is.

What i suggest for electric (not hybrid) cars is a two power setup. Use a storage battery that can be recharged off conventional A/C power, and a fuel cell for long distance - high speed travel, and charging the storage battery when possible. I suggest the use of a methane powered fuel cell, examples which seem to be lab curiosities now and which hopefully can be made cost-competitive.

Note: I said "methane" above, not "natural gas," the latter implying a fossil fuel. Methane can come from a variety of sources, including from local waste dumps, sewage treatment plants, cows, and the fermentation of waste biomasss with the right enzymes/microbes. I suggest methane in fuel cells for electric cars because local distribution of natural gas is already set up in many places.

And what about taxing the "fuel" for electric vehicles? Recharging an electric car at home will cost a lot more if you have to pay the equivalent fuel taxes currently applied on gasoline/diesel for cars/trucks, Ditto for hydrogen, natural gas, solar cell recharging, etc... You think the guvmint won't put "road" taxes on whatever the source of the electricity for electric cars? LOL

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