Mozilla CEO Resigns Amid Prop 8 Contr...

Mozilla CEO Resigns Amid Prop 8 Controversy

There are 53 comments on the EDGE story from Apr 3, 2014, titled Mozilla CEO Resigns Amid Prop 8 Controversy. In it, EDGE reports that:

Brendan Eich has been the CEO of Mozilla for under a month but the software company announced Thursday that he would be stepping down from his new position due to the controversy sparked by his 2008 donation to a Proposition 8 campaign.

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Boyd

Boardman, OR

#1 Apr 3, 2014
Leave it to the queers to ruin a good man's career.

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#2 Apr 3, 2014
He's got nobody to blame but himself, if he hadn't sought the CEO position, nobody would have brought this up again. He got away with it as Chief Technology Officer, it just didn't make him popular, but as the face of the company, his donation to unconstitutional bigotry, came back to haunt him.
Fundies R Mentally Nil

Philadelphia, PA

#3 Apr 3, 2014
Boyd wrote:
Leave it to the queers to ruin a good man's career.
Prop Ate his job.

“Common courtesy, isn't”

Since: Nov 07

Location hidden

#4 Apr 3, 2014
I applaud Brendan Eich for putting his tail between his legs and crawling away in shame like the yellow-bellied reptile he is. Let his public humiliation and disgrace serve as an example to all the other disgusting, unevolved creatures who slither around in the dark, fetid muck of anti-gay bigotry and oppression.

“Common courtesy, isn't”

Since: Nov 07

Location hidden

#5 Apr 3, 2014
Otter in the Ozarks wrote:
<quoted text>
I applaud Brendan Eich for putting his tail between his legs and crawling away in shame like the yellow-bellied reptile he is. Let his public humiliation and disgrace serve as an example to all the other disgusting, unevolved creatures who slither around in the dark, fetid muck of anti-gay bigotry and oppression.
Oh, spot on! I agree with me completely. ;-p

“Where's my fairy wand!”

Since: Apr 08

Reading PA

#6 Apr 4, 2014
Boyd wrote:
Leave it to the queers to ruin a good man's career.
He RESIGNED - we didn't FIRE him.
hi hi

Lancaster, PA

#7 Apr 4, 2014
KirkW wrote:
<quoted text>
He RESIGNED - we didn't FIRE him.
To the antigay themselves, the answer to all of this is the easiest of all: What you did is now coming back to bite you; stop sniveling like dumbasses about it.

But my actual feelings on what occurred are more complex than that.

And I do believe that Eich is more fallout from the fight: The antigay keep raising hell, and the pro-gay will be sure to keep raising hell.

Every time I picture how all of this would have happened if the antigay had not been so vociferous, I picture the pro-gay being more even-keeled and not quite so vicious. The antigay viciousness -- and that, purely, is what it is -- has turned the pro-gay somewhat the same, and I do not blame the pro-gay for a second. It's understandable and natural, to me.

Perhaps what I'm saying is not translating or wouldn't be understandable to anyone else who reads this, but every time I think about it, I think this wouldn't have all turned so nasty if the antigay had been calmer and if they HADN'T ACTED SO ENTITLED. That's what caused quite a bit of fury, in my eyes.

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#8 Apr 4, 2014
The right wing is having an absolute conniption fit over this, throwing around words like fascism and gaystapo. Their hysteria would be hysterical if it weren't so downright dangerous, see Mississippi's "religious freedom restoration act" for example.

Yes, he had a right to donate to to an effort to pass an unconstitutional constitutional amendment, that those who it affected found an incredibly offensive thing to be doing, no matter how noble and/or moral he claimed his motives to be. He exercised that right at his own risk, because people enjoy the right to be deeply offended by that exercise and to express it. Why Mozilla didn't consider that there would be people in the public and in the company that wouldn't remember this incident fondly, I don't know. This isn't fascism, it's freedom, we to have the right to be offended, whether you are or not and we have the right to express it, whether you approve or not. You know, like they have the right to sillily throw around meaningless buzz words like fascism and gaystapo in over reaction to the outcome. Mozilla and Eichs determined how this ended, not us.
Dan

United States

#9 Apr 4, 2014
Rick in Kansas wrote:
The right wing is having an absolute conniption fit over this, throwing around words like fascism and gaystapo. Their hysteria would be hysterical if it weren't so downright dangerous, see Mississippi's "religious freedom restoration act" for example.
Yes, he had a right to donate to to an effort to pass an unconstitutional constitutional amendment, that those who it affected found an incredibly offensive thing to be doing, no matter how noble and/or moral he claimed his motives to be. He exercised that right at his own risk, because people enjoy the right to be deeply offended by that exercise and to express it. Why Mozilla didn't consider that there would be people in the public and in the company that wouldn't remember this incident fondly, I don't know. This isn't fascism, it's freedom, we to have the right to be offended, whether you are or not and we have the right to express it, whether you approve or not. You know, like they have the right to sillily throw around meaningless buzz words like fascism and gaystapo in over reaction to the outcome. Mozilla and Eichs determined how this ended, not us.
So, had he funded StopH8 and met the same fate, no problem with that.

Right?

Flip the script and it's fine as people have the right to express offense and disapproval, and that's just how these things play out sometimes.
Wondering

Tyngsboro, MA

#10 Apr 4, 2014
Dan wrote:
<quoted text>
So, had he funded StopH8 and met the same fate, no problem with that.
Right?
Flip the script and it's fine as people have the right to express offense and disapproval, and that's just how these things play out sometimes.
Interesting piece here:
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher...

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#11 Apr 4, 2014
Dan wrote:
So, had he funded StopH8 and met the same fate, no problem with that.
Right?
Flip the script and it's fine as people have the right to express offense and disapproval, and that's just how these things play out sometimes.
We all enjoy the right to be offended by an outcome and express our offense at that outcome, regardless of the outcome. You win some, you lose some, sometimes winning can be offensive, sometimes losing isn't.
Dan

Omaha, NE

#12 Apr 4, 2014
Wondering wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting piece here:
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher...
Article nailed it.

Sullivan's excerpt was very telling.
Dan

Omaha, NE

#13 Apr 4, 2014
Rick in Kansas wrote:
<quoted text>We all enjoy the right to be offended by an outcome and express our offense at that outcome, regardless of the outcome. You win some, you lose some, sometimes winning can be offensive, sometimes losing isn't.
So, if this did happen as I laid out, I wouldn't find anything from you on a message board decrying it.

I mean, it just happens.
Fundies R Mentally Nil

Philadelphia, PA

#14 Apr 4, 2014
Sullivan has a history of being massively wrong. The current piece at huffpost's gay voices board does a masterful job of laying that out.
Wondering

Tyngsboro, MA

#15 Apr 4, 2014
hi hi wrote:
I picture the pro-gay being more even-keeled and not quite so vicious. The antigay viciousness -- and that, purely, is what it is -- has turned the pro-gay somewhat the same, and I do not blame the pro-gay for a second. It's understandable and natural, to me.
Perhaps what I'm saying is not translating or wouldn't be understandable to anyone else who reads this, but every time I think about it, I think this wouldn't have all turned so nasty if the antigay had been calmer and if they HADN'T ACTED SO ENTITLED. That's what caused quite a bit of fury, in my eyes.
I see it differently. I see gays forcing themselves into places they aren't wanted. I see them interfering with other people's lives. I see them suing everyone who won't bow to them. Even you, you think religion is silly and unbelievable. You think if people just looked at their religions they would agree, dump their faith and side with you. No, you're wrong. Look at your movement and tell me who's acting so entitled.
Hank

New York, NY

#16 Apr 4, 2014
Wondering wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting piece here:
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher...
Great article. 100% spot on!

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#17 Apr 4, 2014
He did the right thing in resigning not because of his views but because it's such a public company priding itself on access for all. To use profits [his to use yes] for something [anything] so personal and contraversial isn't good PR for an unbiased organisation.

“Where's my fairy wand!”

Since: Apr 08

Reading PA

#18 Apr 4, 2014
Dan wrote:
<quoted text>
So, had he funded StopH8 and met the same fate, no problem with that.
Right?
Flip the script and it's fine as people have the right to express offense and disapproval, and that's just how these things play out sometimes.
You're right - that door wings both ways. And Chick-fil-A is an example. When their President was held up to scrutiny for his anti-gay comments the religious right came out in droves to support him and he's still there, as anti-gay as ever leading his anti-gay company.

Mr. Eich was perfectly entitled to make whatever contributions he wanted. BUT...anytime you take a position on a controversial topic and you are in the public eye (like a business leader or politician or other person of notoriety) you do so understanding that you are NOT indemnified against any reaction to your decision.

And lets be a little honest - it's a bit of a disconnect to have a CEO against gay rights leading a company that is gay friendly.

Besides, everything I read says he resigned - he wasn't fired.
Dan

Omaha, NE

#19 Apr 4, 2014
Fundies R Mentally Nil wrote:
Sullivan has a history of being massively wrong. The current piece at huffpost's gay voices board does a masterful job of laying that out.
Oh, well, that's the last word, then.
Dan

Omaha, NE

#20 Apr 4, 2014
Velvet MJK wrote:
He did the right thing in resigning not because of his views but because it's such a public company priding itself on access for all. To use profits [his to use yes] for something [anything] so personal and contraversial isn't good PR for an unbiased organisation.
They seem kind of biased.

They seem cool with access to all, as long as you toe the line with their groupthink.

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