Overworked?
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Sewol

Hazleton, PA

#1 Nov 12, 2012
Overworked is an understatement. I have never worked so hard in my life as Lowes has been working me the last few months. I can’t even take my breaks and have even been summoned two times while in the bathroom, where co-workers actually came in the bathroom to get me, saying hurry up, customer needs assistance.
Even taken lunch is becoming a major issue in my store because of coverage.
Most times I don’t get to take it to the sixth hour. I’m sore all the time. Workers have been getting hurt more frequently in my store. Every one seems to be rushing everywhere, eyes bulging, sweating, shaking, the stress is overwhelming.
I also have been noticing a lot of co-workers flipping out on the floor, I observed one female manager bawling like a person having a nervous breakdown, shaking crying and screaming before she was rushed into a backroom and re-cycled. What the hell is going on? Pretty scary to say the least. Whats next roller blades to get around the store quicker?
Is this stuff going on in all stores?
CharlesinCharge

Lakeland, FL

#2 Nov 12, 2012
I will ask again???? Why do you people do this to yourselves?......You get payed exactly the same if you go in and do an ok job and leave, or if you let yourself go crazy...For what?? Lowes does not give a shit about you..They will use and abuse you as much as YOU LET THEM..........CALM DOWN..........LEF....Keep Sinking......
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#3 Nov 12, 2012
There's no need to rush for anything because it is safety that is job #1. Call buttons can be "tested" out anyway and I'd argue they are going to be removed eventually and corporate doesn't even look at the button reports anyway.

Don't respond to people if they bother you in the bathroom.

When in doubt you can just tell the customer to look it up online because chances are websites have more information than the store.

I'd argue some of the biggest crock is the concept that everyone has to be told to their faces rather than just verbally. I used to know a guy that when called to go to an isle he tell them that the customer should put the question in the cart and go to him! Which makes sense because if you look at say, a deli you take a number and line up. At no point is there a mob asking the counter help things and they are all surrounded.
Potty Head Alvarez

Schnecksville, PA

#4 Nov 12, 2012
Sewol wrote:
co-workers actually came in the bathroom to get me, saying hurry up, customer needs assistance.
Tell them to send the customer into the bathroom for assistance.
Sewol

Hazleton, PA

#5 Nov 13, 2012
CharlesinCharge wrote:
I will ask again???? Why do you people do this to yourselves?......You get payed exactly the same if you go in and do an ok job and leave, or if you let yourself go crazy...For what?? Lowes does not give a shit about you..They will use and abuse you as much as YOU LET THEM..........CALM DOWN..........LEF....Keep Sinking......
I'm going to really think about this. I just can not see just doing an OK job. I know they do not give a shit about me. Its me I want to be the the best that I can be. The reality is to be the best does not matter.
fed up specialist

United States

#6 Nov 13, 2012
If you think it's bad working here...wait till you get " laid off". Its even worse.
countrygirl

Boston, MA

#7 Nov 13, 2012
Sewol wrote:
Overworked is an understatement. I have never worked so hard in my life as Lowes has been working me the last few months. I can’t even take my breaks and have even been summoned two times while in the bathroom, where co-workers actually came in the bathroom to get me, saying hurry up, customer needs assistance.
Even taken lunch is becoming a major issue in my store because of coverage.
Most times I don’t get to take it to the sixth hour. I’m sore all the time. Workers have been getting hurt more frequently in my store. Every one seems to be rushing everywhere, eyes bulging, sweating, shaking, the stress is overwhelming.
I also have been noticing a lot of co-workers flipping out on the floor, I observed one female manager bawling like a person having a nervous breakdown, shaking crying and screaming before she was rushed into a backroom and re-cycled. What the hell is going on? Pretty scary to say the least. Whats next roller blades to get around the store quicker?
Is this stuff going on in all stores?
Yep, sounds like the one I work in; part timers cut big time because of lower sales this time of year, no coverage ANYWHERE while the "chosen few ENTITLED" associates stand around and gossop while the truly dedicated associates are trying to hold the whole ship together from sinking; its ridiculous, totally out of control and mgt. does NOTHING about the lazy associates who don't do anything and yet get paid for it. Morale is at a record LOW(E). Customers get mad because they're not getting the service they demand QUICKLY. Lots of associates who CAN are retiring; good for them!!! Jump ship while you can!!! Its a real mess, and SAD for those who really wanted to make a difference AND a career out of Lowes. Now they take away our Lifetrack points because it costs them money to hand out the rewards. No one is going to participate in the NEW AND IMPROVED lifetrack that is due in 2013. There is no incentive; they're talking about it on connections, first the $35 Christmas, then the restructuring of the SSEI,(what a joke), then the spiffs and commission and now Lifetrack; what else is there to take from the employees now? I believe you when you all say LOWES DOESNT GIVE A SHIT ABOUT ITS EMPLOYEES. I SHOULD KNOW, IM ONE OF THEM.
Sewol

Hazleton, PA

#8 Nov 13, 2012
Countygirl, Oh gosh I can not believe I forget to mention morale. There is no morale. I have to pull a "hello" out of my co-workers mouths.
7996kygirl

Tucker, GA

#9 Nov 13, 2012
It is the same in my store too. The ones with a good work ethic are worked into the ground. Since there is no more spiff or commission all the SOS crap no one wants to deal with is dumped on us. Pretty sad. DM in OSLG brings his customers all the way to pro sales desk to have us figure fencing and heaven forbid someone asks a question about a storage barn!
ASM

Mobile, AL

#10 Nov 13, 2012
I wouldn't blame Lowe's but instead blame poor management. Company's do not run good employees off, poor management does. I worked my way up from a part time associate and know how challenging it can be having an uninformed or poor management team. I would email your market manager or area hr if you think you have a good case. Lowe's is not suppose to be miserable.
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#11 Nov 13, 2012
When they gutted training they should have expected this. I'm not saying it has to be experience from another place or a degree but to eliminate emtp, mtp, ops training, admin training sales training etc was just wrong.
Bird

Plymouth, MI

#12 Nov 13, 2012
nedm wrote:
When they gutted training they should have expected this. I'm not saying it has to be experience from another place or a degree but to eliminate emtp, mtp, ops training, admin training sales training etc was just wrong.
There is a little merit to this idea if we are talking some time in the future, however, many if not most of the management running Lowe's stores today have been through one of the management training programs. Quite a bit of them have been with the company for over ten years now. It's their job to sell what the company is piping down the tubes to them, however, how can you sell this? I don't think there is a training program out there that can teach one how to run a store without having at least one person in each area. It won't work at Lowe's. And I know people have used Target, Wal-Mart, or K-Mart as an example here on how low staffing works in some places. However, there is a big difference between "Will you get me a pillow down off the top shelf?", and, "Will you work up an estimate on my fencing project, whole house carpet install, or new kitchen." Lowe's refuses to recognize that there is a whole lot more in-depth and hands on dealings with customers here than there is at Wal-Mart or K-Mart. The most in-depth dealings there are probably sporting license sales. It doesn't take lots of coverage to get a toy down off the shelf for a customer, nobody has in-depth questions about a toothbrush or shampoo. I mean admit it, how many questions are asked at Lowe's about Papertowels, Garbage Bags, or Potato Chips? Wal-Mart, K-Mart, and Target are all full of items such as this, in other words, they sell themselves.
zal font load

Angola, NY

#13 Nov 13, 2012
Of course they refuse to recognize the greater amount of in-depth and hands on dealings we encounter than the Wal-marts of the world. But i often wonder.....is it foolish ignorance or blatant indifference? I mean lets assume for now that these are at least reasonably intellegent people. That leads us to one of two conclusions...they for all their knowledge are still clueless (which is inexcusable) or they know full well that this low staffing approach is doomed to fail eventually given the nature of many goods and services we sell. So what is the end game? Why purposefully use an approach that cannot work (long term)unless you just plan on gutting as much profit out before watching the ship sink ?
Bird

New York, NY

#14 Nov 13, 2012
Hard to say Zal. I know that I watch thousands of dollars walk out the door every day riding the frown on a dissatisfied customer's face. If they are trying to gut the company, then they surely aren't going about it the right way. They may actually think that less = more. They talked about how most customers show up and know exactly what they need, you just have to show them where it is. What they refuse to admit is that if you have only enough people to point and/or walk people to product, then, you have no time to capture the big money sales from people who need more "in-depth" attention. If all you have is just enough, or not enough staffing to point and walk, or, to answer phone calls, then, your big purchases start walking out the door. They may not be as high in margin, however, even with lower margin, you still have to sell a whole freakin lot of pipe fittings to get the same profit as you do from one french door refrigerator sale or from one kitchen design. They are forgetting the high dollar sale, a little bit of time spent, and one sale can turn your sales day around. That's what they are missing. Hard to say why they cannot see this or, why they refuse to admit they are doing it wrong. You may be on to something with what you are saying about reaming as much out of the company as possible, however.
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#15 Nov 14, 2012
But employees in any retail store cannot do "in depth" information. There are significant liabilities for providing bad advice or worse yet to a customer that cannot exert what they are being told. With that in mind it makes more economically sense to just tell them to search the internet or buy a book.

"There is a little merit to this idea if we are talking some time in the future, however, many if not most of the management running Lowe's stores today have been through one of the management training programs. Quite a bit of them have been with the company for over ten years now."

That's not exactly true. I've seen plenty of new HR's hired in stores since it has a high turnover rate. Heck SM's last what...three years maybe? Other chains are doing better and it is hard to keep people that want to move up.

" "Will you work up an estimate on my fencing project, whole house carpet install, or new kitchen." Lowe's refuses to recognize that there is a whole lot more in-depth and hands on dealings with customers here than there is at Wal-Mart or K-Mart."

But there' a huge difference in selling carpet, a fence and a kitchen. A kitchen is designed. Fences aren't. Square feet are something that a 4th grader knows. Carpet isn't that hard if you are plotting it out. Now if you were maybe the installer then that is something different.

But lowes is a diy store and if you want to admit to it or not the employees cannot for example say anything of building or zoning code. They have to check with their city or town hall. Besides a store can serve a number of different towns and it would be quite taxing to upgrade the code with every little change. One netbook and wifi has more information about diy products and services than an entire store of people. Even the company adds to this by having a youtube channel with diy projects.

Everyone knows that lowes positions do not require a degree nor experience in diy projects so the titles are well decorations. Who would contact a lowes employee on plumbing issues if there's a plumber that makes his or her living off of it? Lowes has free advise..wel you get what you pay for.
BunkersHole

Bluefield, VA

#16 Nov 14, 2012
What gets me… on top of the staffing and scheduling issues that every Lowe’s store is facing, is the alarming shift away from having a knowledgeable, capable and dedicated staff into hiring just about anyone who can pass the drug test. The hiring standards have dropped significantly and corporate actually believes that these new employees are capable of “inspiriting” customers? That my friend… is pure ignorance!

Lowe’s continues to chase off veteran employees, ignore the massive morale issues, favoritism, and on and on.

The corporate game plan shows zero long term vision and growth… lower payroll for short term gain only.

As we all know, Lowe’s is an entirely different retail environment than other retailers. Selling a $25,000 kitchen is just a little bit different than selling deodorant.

We the workers understand this, our customers understand this, and our competitors certainly understand this! But corporate Lowe’s doesn’t…

Go figure.
Sewol

Hazleton, PA

#17 Nov 14, 2012
Carpet isn't that hard if you are plotting it out. Now if you were maybe the installer then that is something different.
I don’t think so, couldn’t be any further than the truth."Plotting it out" is a big responsibility and it is called an "estimate" Carpeting is not that easy, you really have to have a lot of product knowledge. I think anyone could figure out a square room. But when it comes to doing a whole house its not easy by no means! Did you know that an average flooring customer takes about 3 1/2hrs. From start to finish? Some take 5hrs. or more. Here’s a grip of mine………
I sell and I sell a lot, a typical week lets say I sell 10 new customers a flooring job. First I sell the product and than a detail. Second I get the detail back and do the estimate after that I call the customer to come to the store to go over their estimate, and then I do the contracts. It does not end here. When the time comes I have to cut the carpets, and the pad and get what ever else is needed for the install. Lets do the math here 10 customers, times 3 ½ hours = 35 work hours. WHEN DO I HAVE TIME FOR ALL THE REST LOWES WANTS FROM ME? Zoning, up stocking, down stocking, dusting, race for the cup, labels, pricing, serving customers, picking internet orders, cutting carpets,off the racks for DIY, checking inventory for other stores,cutting ceramic tiles,work management,calling customers, calling vendors,tractor push,meetings, training, loading cars. etc. etc. WHEN I AM THE ONLY ONE IN MY DEPARTMENT, AND COVERING ANOTHER DEPARTMENT???? Don’t say flooring is not that hard!I AM OVERWORKED TO THE MAX EVERY SHIFT!!!
Larry

Rochester, MI

#18 Nov 14, 2012
"But employees in any retail store cannot do "in depth" information. There are significant liabilities for providing bad advice or worse yet to a customer that cannot exert what they are being told. With that in mind it makes more economically sense to just tell them to search the internet or buy a book."

But customers now believe they can do almost any project on their own-and if it doesnt work out, they can blame the store. Lowes and Depot made it easy for customers to purchase items that years ago they would not dream of installing themselves.
How many people installed their own carpet, tile, bathtub or toilet in the 50's,60's etc? Hardly anyne. You called an installer.
Now you go into Lowes, buy what you want, ask a few questions and give it a try. Just saying in the last 30 years big box stores have made DIY projects look too easy and its not as easy as going into Walmart and buying a bag of chips.

www.lowesemployees.com

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#19 Nov 14, 2012
I think Lowes uses the mirror test on potential new hires-Breathe on this mirror-- is there steam on the mirror? If so, you are hired.
Bird

Highland, MI

#20 Nov 14, 2012
"But there' a huge difference in selling carpet, a fence and a kitchen. A kitchen is designed. Fences aren't. Square feet are something that a 4th grader knows. Carpet isn't that hard if you are plotting it out. Now if you were maybe the installer then that is something different"

Each is different in its own respects, however, each one also has one common denominator....... Attention to Detail. If you don't have the time, or, if the atmosphere is so hectic that attention to detail is impossible, then, mistakes will be made, customers will be lost for good, and the job can in no way be completed properly.

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