minimum part time hours per shift and...

minimum part time hours per shift and per week?

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MrlowesCSA

Tallahassee, FL

#1 Mar 7, 2012
Does anyone know if lowes has a HR policy that states the minimum number of hours they can schedule part timers per shift and per week?
partofthesolutio n

Fort Wayne, IN

#2 Mar 7, 2012
MrlowesCSA wrote:
Does anyone know if lowes has a HR policy that states the minimum number of hours they can schedule part timers per shift and per week?
I believe minimum of 4 hour shifts, and a minimum of 12 hours per week.
MrlowesCSA

Tallahassee, FL

#3 Mar 7, 2012
Thanks, thats what I thought. The problem is sometimes they schedule us until 10 and the store closes at 9 and we dont stay until 10pm. its a large gasoline expense for 3 hours.

Since: Feb 12

Location hidden

#4 Mar 7, 2012
MrlowesCSA wrote:
Thanks, thats what I thought. The problem is sometimes they schedule us until 10 and the store closes at 9 and we dont stay until 10pm. its a large gasoline expense for 3 hours.
It is policy and if I'm not mistaken law that when you are schedualed for work you are garuntied.
partofthesolutio n

Fort Wayne, IN

#5 Mar 8, 2012
MrlowesCSA wrote:
Thanks, thats what I thought. The problem is sometimes they schedule us until 10 and the store closes at 9 and we dont stay until 10pm. its a large gasoline expense for 3 hours.
A manager can not make you leave earlier than you're scheduled, but if he asks,, and you agree, always try to document it somewhere in kronos. Also make sure you're productive the whole time and not just trying to get your hours, lol.
OhNoHeDidnt

Lakewood, OH

#6 Mar 8, 2012
It may vary from state to state, but the actual minimum hours per week is 10. We had to part ways with a CSA that was only able to work 8 hours a week and she barely showed up for those.

As far as leaving earlier than scheduled, that is one of the grey areas that fall under the "discretion of the manager" items. The only positions guaranteed to get their hours in that they were scheduled is full time.
partofthesolutio n

United States

#7 Mar 8, 2012
OhNoHeDidnt wrote:
It may vary from state to state, but the actual minimum hours per week is 10. We had to part ways with a CSA that was only able to work 8 hours a week and she barely showed up for those.
As far as leaving earlier than scheduled, that is one of the grey areas that fall under the "discretion of the manager" items. The only positions guaranteed to get their hours in that they were scheduled is full time.
Agreed, unless the manager is asking you to leave, forcing you to be under the 10 or 12 hours? I would think....

Since: Jan 12

Nashua, NH

#8 Mar 8, 2012
I thought it was 9 hours(min per week) and no limit on shifts (could be 1). I'm thinking back 6 years so I could be wrong...
Hoover

Ridgeland, MS

#9 Dec 10, 2012
What if your name is on the schedule but your not working at all that week? Isn't there suppose to be a law that you have to give all your employees a certain amount of hours a week? Because I'm not getting none an making no money.
DMxMD

Fairfax, VA

#10 Dec 10, 2012
I do not know of a law in any state that guarantees any hours to anyone ever. That would be an insanely anti-business law and one that would severely infringe on the rights of a business or owner to manage expenses.

General policy is minimum 10hrs per week. The only shift requirement is the reporting pay policy that says if you come in you will be paid for a minimum of two hours, even if you are sent home.

As for not being there until 10, they have every right to have you clock out early and leave if the store is ready. Whoever said they can't make you do that, or that there is a law if you're scheduled you're guaranteed the hours, is completely full of it. You could be asked to leave two hours into your shift or asked not to come in the next day at all. PT has no rules at all besides the 10hrs to stay employed and reporting pay. Even full time employees are shuffled out the door as soon as the store is ready this time of year, and any ASM/SM would laugh if told they couldn't do that. Controlling payroll is a 100% necessity for managing a business. There would never be a policy limiting managers ability to do that.
LeadH20 Stank

Schnecksville, PA

#11 Dec 10, 2012
DMxMD wrote:
I do not know of a law in any state that guarantees any hours to anyone ever.
NEDM can you please google something up and prove this numb nuts wrong?
wenotme

Homestead, PA

#12 Dec 10, 2012
partofthesolution wrote:
<quoted text>
A manager can not make you leave earlier than you're scheduled, but if he asks,, and you agree, always try to document it somewhere in kronos. Also make sure you're productive the whole time and not just trying to get your hours, lol.
How productive was Niblock when he made his 20+million dollars in a series of stock trades last month?
wenotme

Homestead, PA

#13 Dec 10, 2012
...And if i was a betting man i'd wager they were done using company computers by a company accountant...
partofthesolutio n

Indianapolis, IN

#14 Dec 11, 2012
You're not going to hear me defend Nibby, lol. Regardless of whether the store is "ready," there are always things to do, and a manager can not make/force any employee to go home if it means that employee will be under 39 hours as a FT, or under 10 for a PT'er. I've seen managers call PT'ers before their shifts and tell them we're cutting, don't come in. But they got in trouble because it was one of only 2 days that employee was scheduled, and that employee finished with just 5.5 hours for the week.
wenotme wrote:
...And if i was a betting man i'd wager they were done using company computers by a company accountant...
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#15 Dec 11, 2012
State laws vary dramatically on this.

In Mass for anyone that is told to call in they have to get three hours even if they just worked one.

Technically no part timer is outright assured hours but if they are scheduled it would be for at least eight. Those eight hours can be cut in half for two four hour days but no more than that because then they'd be paying for more than what they worked (see above). The raw schedules from corporate that used to come out were all screwed up. They would often divide the hours to be one one hour day and one nine hour day which obviously isn't going to happen.

I've seen hours get cut and a few times people asked to volunteer to leave early.

Given that no one is allowed to change the schedule unless you agree to it (old staffworks document I put a post on awhile ago) I would argue that the counting of this would simply be people taking shorter lunches. There's no law that states that states employees must take a full hour for lunch. That and you could clock in early.

I remember some old zm's that would leave early and then the SM found out and gave them the wrath of God about if you are scheduled to xyz then you MUST STAY to xyz, otherwise you are cheating the store.

Simply having employees in a store is a light form of security. The more round the clock coverage (night crew, we team etc) the less likely the place is to get robbed. Yes cameras can help to a point but they cannot tell people to stop or call the cops. Maybe an LP could chime in here.

I could make an argument that chances are in mid to larger stores there might be more cash in the vaults than a small bank.
DMxMD

Fairfax, VA

#16 Dec 11, 2012
partofthesolution wrote:
You're not going to hear me defend Nibby, lol. Regardless of whether the store is "ready," there are always things to do, and a manager can not make/force any employee to go home if it means that employee will be under 39 hours as a FT, or under 10 for a PT'er. I've seen managers call PT'ers before their shifts and tell them we're cutting, don't come in. But they got in trouble because it was one of only 2 days that employee was scheduled, and that employee finished with just 5.5 hours for the week.
<quoted text>
This is absolutely 110% false.

Just some advice to the CSAs, specialists, and other hourly employees out there, do not ever listen to another hourly try and tell you what policy is, or what a member of management can or can not do. They are almost always wrong, as they probably heard it from someone else, and they heard it from someone else, and on and on until someone originally heard it from NEDM when he was making stuff up in the break room 7 years ago. Even the written policies are enforced differently depending on the year, VPSO, MD, etc.
60k Appliance Invoicer

Schnecksville, PA

#17 Dec 11, 2012
DMxMD wrote:
<quoted text>
This is absolutely 110% false.
Just some advice to the CSAs, specialists, and other hourly employees out there, do not ever listen to another hourly try and tell you what policy is, or what a member of management can or can not do. They are almost always wrong, as they probably heard it from someone else, and they heard it from someone else, and on and on until someone originally heard it from NEDM when he was making stuff up in the break room 7 years ago. Even the written policies are enforced differently depending on the year, VPSO, MD, etc.
Is it true that you wear $260 shoes? And how can something be more than 100% false?
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#18 Dec 11, 2012
"Just some advice to the CSAs, specialists, and other hourly employees out there, do not ever listen to another hourly try and tell you what policy is, or what a member of management can or can not do. They are almost always wrong, as they probably heard it from someone else, and they heard it from someone else, and on and on until someone originally heard it from NEDM when he was making stuff up in the break room 7 years ago. Even the written policies are enforced differently depending on the year, VPSO, MD, etc".

Enforcing policies differently depending on the year or management is a easy way to get sued. No I didn't make stuff up the breakroom.

Yes I can tell what management can and cannot do that's why there's rules on every sort of little thing around. Can a salary manager climb on top of top stock and move things around unteathered to the picker? Not really as if he or she falls the company wouldn't have to pay for the workmans comp.

If someone makes a mistake that causes personal injury to themselves or others that is against policy they can be sued.

If you think that management can do whatever it wants without accounting for anything well you are wrong. I've seen management canned for sexual harrasement, cooking financial books, simply being lazy etc.

DMX you are a middle manager. You are not a sm..why I haven't a clue but frankly it becomes apparently that you haven't gone to school. If you get laid off from lowes in all due respect you don't have enough credentials to get something else. Who specifically are you going to use as a reference? Me myself and I ?

Having said this I have seen hours cut and people asked to voluntarily leave a few hours early due to it being slow. Naturally if a store is dead saleswise there are given projections and if they aren't within a given range that can be understandable. To force people not to come in probably won't work, especially for full timers and especially since schedules should be agreed to within 10 or so days of posting.

DMX if written policies are informed differently and they lowered your pay by half and increased your hours by 8 more a week would that be OK with you?

I would highly suggest reading some of Mary Parker Follet's on the Giving of Orders. You haven't studied anything of leadership or management and it figures someone like you becomes a ASM in light of the fact that there is no real training or requirements for management. You show up punch a clock and walk around. Bravo!
DMxMD

Fairfax, VA

#19 Dec 11, 2012
Dude, I just used you as an example as someone that worked here forever ago. Calm down. In no way did I say we can do anything we want. Jesus. I simply said, asking a CSA what a SM/ASM can do is not the best source for that information. No, I am not a SM, but I can do anything a SM can do except discipline a salaried manager. I CAN look up the policy on that one for you if you would like. Also, all I mention about policies being enforced differently, is that they change often and are interpreted differently by region or district. For example, one MD may ask that all salaried management be on the corp schedule with no exceptions. Another may allow the SM to schedule as he pleases. My last store gave salaried management every other weekend off instead of rotation days off. Just an example.
zal front load

Angola, NY

#20 Dec 11, 2012
Now there's an idea we could all get behind and benefit from.....every other weekend off. I suspect there are a fairly large group of people who don't mind retail overall save the fact that you work almost every weekend and lose ability to enjoy a holiday with family. You could actually attract some higher quality people and retain more of the cream if sceduling was better. What would be so wrong with more production from your employees? This could be attained if the silly, outdated mindsets that corporate retail clings to were changed. Just think of all the good associates that leave these jobs at first chance because of the lack of life balance these ridiculous schedules cause.

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