exasm

Longs, SC

#1 Aug 4, 2012
I've been with the company since 2005. And I'm supposed to embrace LEF, but nobody can tell me what it is. Forgive my ignorance, but so far it seems like just an upgrade in technology. (most of which doesn't work)
NewBee

Van Alstyne, TX

#2 Aug 4, 2012
exasm wrote:
I've been with the company since 2005. And I'm supposed to embrace LEF, but nobody can tell me what it is. Forgive my ignorance, but so far it seems like just an upgrade in technology.(most of which doesn't work)
Agreed, it is being drug out to long in the full explanation and full release.

But it seems to be geared toward more being ask of each person and reducing the # of employees along with using more advanced computer technical tools. IE connections to communicate task list so that employees can be held accountable. along with empowering employees to take charge of their on training and responsibility's.

But the leaders are having trouble communicating what they want and allowing the employees get it done without interference, it has to start from the top. Managers let the ASM's know what you want and leave them alone to do it ASM's let the department managers know what you want and leave them alone to do it, Department managers let your team know what you want and let them do it.

Empowerment means no micro managing.

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#3 Aug 4, 2012
As far as I can see, LEF has been a failure.I see no difference in sales other than losses.They claimed it would help sales and gave it 3yrs to work. Well they,re off to a bad start.Can,t have good sales #,s with most of your knowlegable help leaving.In my store there are 2 designers leaving,only one appl. person left and 3 new. Can,t learn those depts in a few days. Already seeing customer leaving because new employees not fast enough or knowlegable enough to help.I never saw this from our customers before because we had very agressive and knowlegable people. Now we are getting the Wal-Mart mentality and they don,t seem to care. LEF>>>>>>alm ost Dead On Arrival.
Devils Fan

Albemarle, NC

#4 Aug 5, 2012
The other part of lef is obviously low staffing.
Example, yesterday I was designing a kitchen. Three call buttons go off. All of them go through the complete cycle of not being answered. Ten minutes later a manager came by and asked why I didn't get the call buttons. I simply played the innocent employee and replied I'm trying to do my best. He nodded and replied that he understood. The customer asked if those pages were annoying. I told her I do hear them but refuse to respond to them. The kitchen I was designing was $2300 before taxes. Yes, it was a cheap kitchen but doesn't matter if it was $2300 or $23000. The price was not the point. The point is I work for a company that can pay large bonuses to people who don't even need it versus hiring just three more people at only $15-$16 an hour to make sure things go right on the floor at my store.
So, was I right or wrong in ignoring those call buttons? Please give a reason for your answer.
Furby

Mooresville, NC

#5 Aug 5, 2012
Devils Fan wrote:
The other part of lef is obviously low staffing.
Example, yesterday I was designing a kitchen. Three call buttons go off. All of them go through the complete cycle of not being answered. Ten minutes later a manager came by and asked why I didn't get the call buttons. I simply played the innocent employee and replied I'm trying to do my best. He nodded and replied that he understood. The customer asked if those pages were annoying. I told her I do hear them but refuse to respond to them. The kitchen I was designing was $2300 before taxes. Yes, it was a cheap kitchen but doesn't matter if it was $2300 or $23000. The price was not the point. The point is I work for a company that can pay large bonuses to people who don't even need it versus hiring just three more people at only $15-$16 an hour to make sure things go right on the floor at my store.
So, was I right or wrong in ignoring those call buttons? Please give a reason for your answer.
If you are working on a quote for a customer, whether they are sitting in front of you or not, then you are helping a customer and should not leave to answer a call button.
Nochance

Toronto, Canada

#6 Aug 5, 2012
Devils Fan wrote:
The other part of lef is obviously low staffing.
Example, yesterday I was designing a kitchen. Three call buttons go off. All of them go through the complete cycle of not being answered. Ten minutes later a manager came by and asked why I didn't get the call buttons. I simply played the innocent employee and replied I'm trying to do my best. He nodded and replied that he understood. The customer asked if those pages were annoying. I told her I do hear them but refuse to respond to them. The kitchen I was designing was $2300 before taxes. Yes, it was a cheap kitchen but doesn't matter if it was $2300 or $23000. The price was not the point. The point is I work for a company that can pay large bonuses to people who don't even need it versus hiring just three more people at only $15-$16 an hour to make sure things go right on the floor at my store.
So, was I right or wrong in ignoring those call buttons? Please give a reason for your answer.
Absolutely right! A) customers get annoyed if you keep leaving them to tend to someone else and B) how else will they know what they are doing is not working!?
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#7 Aug 5, 2012
I also agree with Furby. Interrupting a potential sale of five figures to answer someone that might just be asking where the bathrooms are isn't really using time wisely.

To be honest I don't think corporate really looks at call buttons. Long ago while in the ladder isle me and a coworker were moving some around and it broke off the button for ladders. Even today that button hasn't been put back. So corporate doesn't notice that a button hasn't been pressed in 4 1/2 years?

Besides buttons can be "tested" to lower the numbers. I've seen that done dozens of times in a number of stores. They can "test" really early in the morning. If corporate really cared about call buttons they'd look at the cameras to see if they are really testing them. They can but they won't.
another course of action

Mooresville, NC

#8 Aug 5, 2012
Devils Fan wrote:
The other part of lef is obviously low staffing.
Example, yesterday I was designing a kitchen. Three call buttons go off. All of them go through the complete cycle of not being answered. Ten minutes later a manager came by and asked why I didn't get the call buttons. I simply played the innocent employee and replied I'm trying to do my best. He nodded and replied that he understood. The customer asked if those pages were annoying. I told her I do hear them but refuse to respond to them. The kitchen I was designing was $2300 before taxes. Yes, it was a cheap kitchen but doesn't matter if it was $2300 or $23000. The price was not the point. The point is I work for a company that can pay large bonuses to people who don't even need it versus hiring just three more people at only $15-$16 an hour to make sure things go right on the floor at my store.
So, was I right or wrong in ignoring those call buttons? Please give a reason for your answer.
At minimum you should have called an asm and told them you were tied up doing a desighn so they could direct someone else to assist them, that way they can't say you ignored the req for help. If you have an appointment scheduled you may ask an assoc. in a neighboring dept to listen for the call buttons until you're done. Keep in mind tho, you you'll probably have to respond in kind in order to get other employees to work with you on this. Personally I wouldn't simply walk away from the customer in front of me unless they were choosing colors, door styles, etc. then again even at that point I would first try to get someone else to assit first.
another course of action

Mooresville, NC

#9 Aug 5, 2012
Furby wrote:
<quoted text>
If you are working on a quote for a customer, whether they are sitting in front of you or not, then you are helping a customer and should not leave to answer a call button.
If you do not have a customer in front you, you should answer the button. Not doing so is like having a customer walk up to you and ask for assist, you are not working with anyone at that moment but still you blatently ignore them. I know if I was that customer I'd be talking with the manager.
DMxMD

United States

#10 Aug 5, 2012
I think you were right to ignore the button. You were with a customer. However, by saying what you said to the customer, every time they shop in a lowes store and need to use the call button, they will always remember what you said about ignoring them regardless of how fast the response is. It will always be in the back of their mind. Most people equate what one employee does as what ALL employees do, so what you basically told them is no one cares if they need help, and everyone just ignores the call boxes.
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#11 Aug 5, 2012
I'd argue that this is really more corporates fault then anything else. If the chain was staffed and people stayed in their departments why would these be needed to begin with ? I've seen management say answer the buttons and then get someone to help them. Well that is pointless because then they'll press it again. Can't have a policy of escourting customers to products and then say there's buttons for departments to get people back to them.

The designs of the stores can also be to blame because most cabinet areas I see are near receiving. Between power equipment going off, overhead calls for people and call buttons it's a miracle anything gets sold! God forbid if a truck is unloaded and then pallets of product actually block instock cabinets from being sold. This is why some smaller competitors beat the hell out of box stores. No "warehouse" mentality. A loud environment can easily scare off customers, it happens with resturants all the time.
Bird

Fenton, MI

#12 Aug 11, 2012
Devils Fan wrote:
The other part of lef is obviously low staffing.
Example, yesterday I was designing a kitchen. Three call buttons go off. All of them go through the complete cycle of not being answered. Ten minutes later a manager came by and asked why I didn't get the call buttons. I simply played the innocent employee and replied I'm trying to do my best. He nodded and replied that he understood. The customer asked if those pages were annoying. I told her I do hear them but refuse to respond to them. The kitchen I was designing was $2300 before taxes. Yes, it was a cheap kitchen but doesn't matter if it was $2300 or $23000. The price was not the point. The point is I work for a company that can pay large bonuses to people who don't even need it versus hiring just three more people at only $15-$16 an hour to make sure things go right on the floor at my store.
So, was I right or wrong in ignoring those call buttons? Please give a reason for your answer.
I've been in the same boat many times. I tried both ways. Going to the plumbing department is like voluntarily hopping into a black hole. You will not get out anytime soon. I've had customers interested in buying thousands of dollars worth of appliances leave and wave on their way out because I had to run to plumbing to answer a call button and got stuck for 15 minutes. I've had them get upset with me for interrupting our conversation to answer 5 phone calls. I had to calm a lady down today, save a sale for thousands of dollars, and prevent a corporate complaint, because the only person in the department had to keep running to get call buttons and answer questions over the phone.

Now, when I have a customer in a hurry or ready to buy thousands of dollars in product, I won't answer phone calls or call buttons in other departments. I'm sorry, but leaving a customer that is ready to buy, or answering phone call after phone call while they are looking for information, would be the same as leaving the register and the customers in line to go answer a question about a screwdriver. It's just plain bad business. If they want us to be able to take care of customers in droves, answer call buttons, and then field phone calls all at the same time, they are going to have to get more people in here and say to hell with making payroll every week. Seriously, if they get back to having enough people to help customers instead of micro-managing numbers down to the cent, the business will follow. Hey, they do it with theft, people walk out the door with thousands of dollars worth of stuff every day uncontested, it's a loss no matter which way you spin it, although they just call it the cost of doing business. So why not crack down on theft and bend the payroll numbers a bit? It would certainly help.
DMxMD

Gardner, KS

#13 Aug 12, 2012
I hate to say it, because we have the same problem, but that's why you have a plumbing pro and maybe an electrical pro depending on volume. They should be scheduled for the busiest hours only. Very few people can truly answer questions in those areas without help. Why do you think "pro's" exist? Too many ASMs or DMs, depending on who writes the schefule, write it for even coverage between all full timers regardless of position because they feel they need to follow a rotation. The invention of the corp schedule was the worst thing to ever happen to this company. The pros should be scheduled for impact hours. I don't care what they say, most of the commercial customers don't need their help. That's why the pro desk exists. The plumbing and elect dept need to be combined with other departments so that a DM in one of those departments doesn't have to act like a glorified CSA all day. Putting an electrical DM up against an appl/cab/home org/flooring/w&w DM(that's common) would be reduciulous. One manages 6-7 specialists, 2-8 CSAs, SOS, install, and scratch and dent markdowns program, and the other has 2 CSAs and is dept coverage for every one of their shifts. It's completely unequal. Coverage as a whole would be better if they spread DMs back to 1-3 departments based on sales and filled with more CSAs.
Easily amused

Mooresville, NC

#14 Aug 12, 2012
DMxMD wrote:
I think you were right to ignore the button. You were with a customer. However, by saying what you said to the customer, every time they shop in a lowes store and need to use the call button, they will always remember what you said about ignoring them regardless of how fast the response is. It will always be in the back of their mind. Most people equate what one employee does as what ALL employees do, so what you basically told them is no one cares if they need help, and everyone just ignores the call boxes.
I agree, help the customer in front of you first but try to call someone to the button or let someone know you'll be tied up for a while before your appointment gets there. I can't tell you how many times I've walked by the cabinet desk and the specialist tells you that they are busy on a design and couldn't help a customer... sometimes right there in appliances! I'll be busy trying to help 3 or 4 customers and they won't even look up from the desk. Then look at their sales over the next couple of weeks and... nothing. We have one like that and one that is putting something in almost everyday! Maybe lef means surfing the web at work for them! lol

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#15 Aug 12, 2012
Lowes could help things by adding some team leads who are actually team leads not CSA's with a new title and no responsibility. Team leads should be there to get things done for DM's, fix problems, answer questions, assist in selling,move people around to better utilize the manpower,making sure things are getting done and people aren't standing around the commercial desk drinking MD, coffee and jacking their jaws. You know-doing what we get paid to do...work. Many people are lazy and need help keeping busy, some are new employees or poorly trained and a good Team Lead could cover things the DM doesn't get a chance to do. If bosses aren't around (and ours are not-DM's only work 8 hours, ASM's hide in offices or are busy fighting fires and HR-well-best stay in their office-people will do what they want to do or what they get measured on---at Lowes---nothing.

I used to work mfg-I supervised 3rd shift-chain of command-1 supv-me, team lead for almost every dept working. Their job was to make sure the orders got started and completed, training new help, helping with setups, checking quality-making sure their dept ran well. If a problem arose they couldn't handle they called me or maintenance. If a team lead was gone for a night we appointed a temp. lead-usually an experienced worker. This did several things-it gave people a chance at leadership, and it gave us a chance to watch and work with potential leaders. If a position opened up we usually had qualified candidates ready to move up.

At Lowes-they throw you into a dept-probably not a dept manager to greet you and give you an overview, what is expected and what is taboo, no one so you wander around like a lost pup with a phone you don't know how to use trying to help customers in a dept you know nothing about. Then you get chewed out because something is done. How many employees know about Zone Recovery, how to do an IRP correctly, use Genesis, about downstocking, facing etc. I know-it's just common sense. Common sense is learned-if I have never worked in lumber before and someone tells me to flatstact-"what".

A good Team lead would help Lowes immensely but it doesn't fit into their "model". But what could I know? I only have run two businesses, been in management & supervision over 30 yrs and lived life for over 50 yrs...Lowes has stores full of people like me-who have more experience than most of their management in many areas and if they would only tap into that experience they could be awesome. But it won't happen when Lowes is being run by under 30yr old managers who have only worked at Lowes and Lowes knows it all---just ask them. Famous phrase--"it won't/can't work here" , We're different"
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#16 Aug 12, 2012
The way I see it staffing should be simple.
Each department has a opening shift, mid and closer.
Have two people on. One to handle customers and one to deal with freight.(naturally seasonal would need more)
6-3
10-7
2-11
when 2nd shift comes on the 1st goes to lunch
when the 3rd shift comes on the 2nd goes to lunch
by the time the 3rd goes to dinner it would have slowed down
Lumber always needs at least two people. One for the forklift and one spotter. Otherwise nothing can be taken down.
Not Nedm

Mooresville, NC

#17 Aug 19, 2012
nedm wrote:
The way I see it staffing should be simple.
Each department has a opening shift, mid and closer.
Have two people on. One to handle customers and one to deal with freight.(naturally seasonal would need more)
6-3
10-7
2-11
when 2nd shift comes on the 1st goes to lunch
when the 3rd shift comes on the 2nd goes to lunch
by the time the 3rd goes to dinner it would have slowed down
Lumber always needs at least two people. One for the forklift and one spotter. Otherwise nothing can be taken down.
You dont work here anymore. Move on sad little dude.
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#18 Aug 19, 2012
So you reply to posts a week afterward? Who's the troll under the bridge now?
Nedm Mom

Brunswick, GA

#19 Aug 21, 2012
nedm wrote:
So you reply to posts a week afterward? Who's the troll under the bridge now?
Your mom

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Lowes Companies Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Lowes pilot program in east coast to eliminate ... (Oct '15) 1 hr Metoo 1,186
Bye bye install sales associates??? 2 hr Petebonasoro 25
an hr manager at lowes....just say no!! (Apr '13) Jun 19 nedm 85
dlpm 40 hours and 40 hours with 8 hours ot Jun 18 Yeah Right 3
my daddy says===== Jun 16 Totes 2
Lowes dress code update (Jun '14) Jun 12 Meowmeow 36
a dog took a dump in my store today Jun 12 Kenny 4
More from around the web