So is this how Lowe's finds specialists?
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Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#42 Aug 22, 2012
The banks are making incredible tons of money on student loans. It won"t be long and a CSA will need a BA degree to be hired.
Many specialists at my store could build their own house.The last landscape I installed before retiring cost the owner $90,000. Most specialists can explain to a customer how to do the work expertly.
I have a degree but college is not where I learned my management skills.

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#43 Aug 22, 2012
LNSinCA wrote:
The banks are making incredible tons of money on student loans. It won"t be long and a CSA will need a BA degree to be hired.
Many specialists at my store could build their own house.The last landscape I installed before retiring cost the owner $90,000. Most specialists can explain to a customer how to do the work expertly.
I have a degree but college is not where I learned my management skills.
"I have a degree but college is not where I learned my management skills." So true, I learned much of my management skills at my job and as our company grew we needed new skills so we hired consultants or used in house people. It was in the 80's when I developed my mgmt style because of Japan and the goal of upper management to involve their employees some decision making. That is why I have a hard time with Lowes management style-I have experienced both styles and can tell you you have a much happier and productive workplace with the style from the 80's to what we have today-top down-do as I say.
Bird

Novi, MI

#44 Aug 22, 2012
"In the federal government about 51% of employees have a bachelors degree. The field depends generally on what agency. D.C if considered a state would easily have more degrees per capita than any other place in the country."

If there were ever any statement in the history of the world that proved how much wrongful emphasis is put on having a degree by employers, I do not know of it. Surely, if DC is the per capita leader for a US State/District/territory etc in college education, then the job the agencies there are doing right now in running the country should be proof positive that maybe companies should be looking in multiple directions for good hires instead of putting such emphasis on a degree. What am I saying? Let me put it this way. Just because you are a marine bioligist, it doesn't mean you know how to catch fish. Well, if you are on an expidition to find a new species of fish say in the Amazon rain forest, and your marine biologists feel too elite to talk to the indigenous fishermen on the river about what they see, how they fish, and where to catch the fish, then you are destined to fail. If all you ever get done doing is pointing at their funny clothing, and proclaiming how much better your education is than their knowledge of the Rain Forest, then you are going to end up in failure.

Remember, the first things to run from a Tsunami are the "dumb" animals of the forest. They are there every day, they simply sense it is coming, whether or not your level of education has taught you or not. If we feel too superior to listen to their message, and follow their lead, and we just sit basking in the sun, then we find ourselves overwhelmed by water soon enough. Last spring, a huge microburst ripped the neighborhood I live in apart. The storm wasn't your typical gnarly looking super-cell, hardly any thunder at all, but when I noticed how dead calm everything got before it hit, and how all of the animals that were in my yard were suddenly gone, non-existent so to speak, I knew the storm was different. The birds quit singing, the rabbits disappeared, the squirrels vanished. Not the usual result of a simple dark rain cloud on the horizon. Sure enough, it ripped the neighborhood apart.

This happened at Lowe's. We have been screaming about the big wave and the destructive wind for months now, if not years. Well, the executives didn't listen. They felt that their education and pedigree were far superior to our lame "worker bee" class. Well, they found out soon enough.
not nedm

Mooresville, NC

#45 Aug 23, 2012
nedm wrote:
Associates took 2 1/4 years
There was about eight years later
Bachelors took two years
Masters took 2 1/2 -They give you six and I've seen it done in two but it really depends on staffing and when classes are offered
Generally I was open (and still am) to classes in the summer. I also took advantage to an online class during a winter break that also helped. The thing about any degree is you don't just look at it as say one lump of time but rather gradually.
This is getting a tad off track but personally I don't believe in the way the student loan market is. Generally nearly anyone qualifies and because of that most campuses are filled. I've met plenty that are on waiting lists for dorms and usually classrooms on campuses near me are capped at 35 per class. There's no real incentive by schools to lower prices as long as the demand is subsidized. If they took the student loan funds and gave it to states to expand the number of schools rather than expand current ones educational costs would go down.Student loans are bad because you cannot dislodge them from bankruptcy and even if you could the post 2005 reforms mean you plead in front of a judge. Fortuately I banked a fair amount of money and paid out of pocket. I used to do collections and know how debt can linger. I remember one that was almost denied a mortage due to a $300 cell phone bill.
At the same point if lowes instead of opening more stores simply staffed their stores more (hours and employees) sales would go up.
If you want to admit to it or not in a fair amount of fields having a degree is a huge boost. In the military you can enter as an officer.
In Mass we have the quinn bill and police officers get 10% more for their associates, bachelors and masters (although it was split between the state and towns and the state isn't paying their share). To teach in public schools higher licenses can only be obtained with a higher degree. Licenses eventually expire which pretty much means you have to get a degree to teach.
If you want to teach in college some allow with a masters but for a outright university it is pretty much a ph.d. Other professions do require testing in order to actually legally practice like being a lawyer and a doctor.

In the federal government about 51% of employees have a bachelors degree. The field depends generally on what agency. D.C if considered a state would easily have more degrees per capita than any other place in the country.
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2012/01/...
Of course there are good jobs without degrees. Personally without one I would look at maybe being a butcher. You have to deal with being cold and lifting a fair amount but every supermarket pretty much needs one.Factor in mad cow and a customers wants/needs and it is there. Elevator mechanics can do well. The bigger the city the more the need. If a elevator is down are people really going to be willing to walk more than few flights of stairs? Look at how tall the buildings are in major cities (NYC, Houston, Philly, Dallas, LA, SF, Chicago etc) that is not physically possible. Bartenders can also do quite well but it deals with the clientel and location.Locksmiths can do well as even today mechanical locks are still the majority.Tree removal might not sound that big but throw in mother nature and it can be.You figure eventually all trees eventually die making them apt to tip over.
In resumes there are different ways to highlight ksa's (knowledge, skills, abilities). What matters is not the duration but what was accomplished and dealt with.
Ramble, ramble,ramble... Blah, blah blah! Maybe you could get a degree in useless comments on this forum! Just a thought.:>
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#46 Aug 23, 2012
" Surely, if DC is the per capita leader for a US State/District/territory etc in college education, then the job the agencies there are doing right now in running the country should be proof positive that maybe companies should be looking in multiple directions for good hires instead of putting such emphasis on a degree."

Well government work usually requires studying government. There is not always that much of a private company experience that translates. In RI there is the Navy war college. Companies aren't going to give you paramilitary training for the most part (outside of blackwater) Considering that the head quarters for most federal agencies is in DC, that when interests lobby they go to DC and most major records are in DC it is obvious why they need degrees. Just as when a business does commerce with a new country they always go to the capital first and then other areas.

"What am I saying? Let me put it this way. Just because you are a marine bioligist, it doesn't mean you know how to catch fish. Well, if you are on an expidition to find a new species of fish say in the Amazon rain forest, and your marine biologists feel too elite to talk to the indigenous fishermen on the river about what they see, how they fish, and where to catch the fish, then you are destined to fail."

Um marine biologists don't catch fish. More importantly you are trying to imply as if there is little ultility or that there is some "emergancy" that must command a job. On cape cod we have sharks and seals and just found some of the oldest animal bones in history so yes there is some demand for them. Fisherman have been resticted from catching fish since the late 1970's. Go ahead and go to Georges bank (largest fishing grounds in the country) and ask how it's been since then.

The reason why degrees are generally valued is because of the following.

1) A high school diploma is simply not enough.Even with standardized testing it isn't enough.

2) Employers do not teach skills that have a value outside of their own organizations. Yes there can be some exceptions like government compliance, typing and safety standards but that's it. They aren't going to teach you another language, how to use ms excel, how to mix a cocktail, how to drive a big rig or how policy is made.

3) Knowing #2 this makes experience a limited factor.Take IT for example. If someone has say 10 years experience in Visual Basic that doesn't mean they know how to program in Linux. More importantly to employers they might see training to someone with experience as being harder than those without experience because they have to rethink everything. Just like the way how directory paths in novell networking is the total opposite of apple, microsoft and linux From this organizations can become like bubbles with a thick culture dictating how their own policies are taught.Com panies like IBM, AT&T (pre breakup) and Motorola are.

Organizations have no real incentive to confirm what a former employee says to a new employer. Why should they? They are receiving no net benefit from that.

Education on the otherhand does confirm this (at least public). Records are open, professors usually teach the same classes at maybe the same schools. Transcripts are easily given out, you cannot say that in the private market.Can home depot demand a former lowes employee hr file with employee evaulations? Nope.Neither can Menards or Rona etc

4) There's a maximum of how much a given experience counts.If there is no variation it matters less.Take a cop in NYC vs one in Nebraska.Chances are no matter what the one in NYC experiences more of an intensity of experience. While Nebraska looks like Mayberry.If someone is a cashier when should experience top out? A year? Two years? five? Ten? If the job is just obeying how much actual real thinking does it actually require?
DMxMD

United States

#47 Aug 23, 2012
You're right. Every person without s degree should be a meat cutter at the grocery store making $12/HR. That's a bunch of bull. Not to mention most stores are switching to pre cut beef. A bar tender? Seriously? Where do you come up with this stuff? People without a BA can go pretty far in the world still.
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#48 Aug 23, 2012
Bar tenders make a fair amount depending on the clientèle. It is not uncommon to find people that make hundreds if not a thousand a night in affluent areas.

Not all meat is going to pre cut because of Kosher and Halel restrictions. Most supermarkets have some form of a butcher on staff. I'm not talking Trader Joes I mean a full supermarket. After the BSE scare and various recalls in the past 10 years it will never fully switch to all prepackaged meats. I can easily find actual butcher shops within a 40 minute drive. Being a chef can also pay off, I have a good friend that went to Johnson and Wales and a neighbor that was on MasterChef. Food can pay off with the right desire.

I didn't state it HAS to be a BA. All I'm stating is that you have to have something. Maybe it is a certification, maybe it is a certificate, maybe it is a course on designing, maybe vocational/trade school. But you have to have "something" to stand out.
Hambone

Alachua, FL

#49 Jan 5, 2014
nedm wrote:
"All of your examples are for the people performing the work, not the employee selling the product."
True but if customers believe what the employees tell them then they are liable. You cannot give specific advice. I've seen management say this time and time again.
You don't honestly think that stores cite code...right? You aren't specifically detailing how to do plumbing work and wire a .home...right?
More importantly why would anyone trust free advise from someone that sells the product. It is a automatic conflict of interest.
I am hoping for a Electrical pro job I have been in alit of store and most don't know about Electrical but I alway help and can only tell them what they need to do the job because you haven't seen there job but I can help in all departments you just catn't say I guarantee it will work

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

#50 Jan 5, 2014
I'm not a sales pro because I am not overpaid and full of crap. But I can do the job just the same even though I am a humble ameba in the Lowes Food Chain.
I will

Summerville, SC

#51 Jan 11, 2014
Alien wrote:
<quoted text>Apparently there is no intelligent life on you planet
You are aware you just slammed the door on your own dick with that comment.
555ggg

Ullin, IL

#52 Mar 28, 2014
exmanager wrote:
<quoted text>
With an MBA and that "supposed" level of experience, why did you go to work at Lowes in a low level position to begin with? I started at Lowes as a Comm. Sales Assoc. and was Sales Mgr. in 12 months. I had to start at $12.50/hr. because I don't have any degree, just tons of mgmt. experience. If I had an MBA all sorts of other doors would have opened.$$$
I can see why this argument has started. its all very simple.... You were a commercial sales associate. You stood behind a desk all day and sold orders and told everyone one else to go and get them. Its not your fault thats just how it is. most comm. sales. assoc. are lazy and or think their better then everyone else.
ILUVU48

Dublin, OH

#53 Mar 28, 2014
All of you are wrong. All of the specialists were recruited at the nearest short bus stop
jojolowno

Mooresville, NC

#54 Jun 10, 2016
UMMM NO wrote:
<quoted text>
Limited by various laws??? HAHAHAHA!!! Where do you get this shit from??? I guess the lady at foot locker better get to know the new Jordan's inside and out before she sells them to some kid and then gets locked up because he can't dunk the ball!! I love your posts... always good for a laugh!
There are actual plumbing and electrical laws and regulations. In most states it is against code even for a home owner to apply power or water pressure to diy work before having it inspected. Sure you CAN do it yourself. Just try and file a claim when it is discovered you are the one who burned the house down.

There are very few current plumbers, electricians, carpenters who work at lowes just old or injured or sucky ones.
What Me Worry

Syracuse, NY

#55 Jun 10, 2016
exmanager wrote:
<quoted text>

With an MBA and that "supposed" level of experience, why did you go to work at Lowes in a low level position to begin with? I started at Lowes as a Comm. Sales Assoc. and was Sales Mgr. in 12 months. I had to start at $12.50/hr. because I don't have any degree, just tons of mgmt. experience. If I had an MBA all sorts of other doors would have opened.$$$
Why are you jumping all over this guy, I don't think he's offended anyone... Perhaps you made "Sales Mgr" due to the lack of talent of people in your store..ever think of that? My SM thinks that Tools and Hardware to be an autopilot department, yet I cannot even put a number on the amount of customers and employees who hunt me out looking for answers on anything and everything when it comes to building or fixing things ...I am no technical wizard or super impressive degree, but like you, I ALSO have TONS of mgmt experience...But I also have TONS of practical experience...which is becoming harder to find these days. The point is that "Specialist" is a watered down term...Most people who become it have no clue or previous experience in what they've just applied for. True story. Happens non stop in my store. So sad but true.

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