How many Lowe's employees are below the poverty line?

Posted in the Lowes Companies Forum

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the rich get richer

Coplay, PA

#1 Mar 11, 2013
2013 POVERTY GUIDELINES FOR THE 48 CONTIGUOUS STATES
AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Persons in family/household Poverty guideline

1 /$11,490
2 /$15,510
3 /$19,530
4 /$23,550
5 /$27,570
6 /$31,590
7 /$35,610
8 /$39,630

For families/households with more than 8 persons, add $4,020 for each additional person.
the rich get richer

Coplay, PA

#2 Mar 11, 2013
Walmart the largest exploiter of the working poor at least offers an overnight differential.

http://big.assets.huffingtonpost.com/Walmart_...
look in their eyes

Coplay, PA

#3 Mar 11, 2013
My trip to my local Lowes last weekend gave me a glimpse into a future of failure and futility. Until 2009, I had four choices of Lowes within 15 miles of my house. There was a store 8 miles east, 12 miles west, 15 miles north, and 15 miles south of my house. In an act of supreme hubris, Lowes opened a store smack in the middle of these four stores, four miles from my house. The Hatfield store opened in early 2009. I insisted it would be a dud and would crush the profitability of the market by cannibalizing the other four stores.

I pulled into the Lowes parking lot at 11:30 am on a Saturday. Big Box retailers do 50% of their business on the weekend. The busiest time frame is from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm on Saturday. Big box retailers build enough parking spots to handle this peak period. The 120,000 square feet Hatfield Lowes has approximately 1,000 parking spaces. I pulled into the spot closest to the entrance during their supposed peak period. There were about 70 cars in the parking lot, with most probably owned by Lowes workers. It is a pleasure to shop in this store, with wide open aisles, and an employee to customer ratio of four to one. The store has 14 checkout lanes and at peak period on a Saturday, there was ONE checkout lane open, with no lines. This is a corporate profit disaster in the making, but the human tragedy far overrides the declining profits of this mega-retailer.

As you walk around this museum of tools and toilets you notice the looks on the faces of the workers. These aren’t the tattooed, face pierced freaks you find in many retail establishments these days. They are my neighbors. They are the beaten down middle class. They are the middle aged professionals who got cast aside by the mega-corporations in the name of efficiency, outsourcing, right sizing, stock buybacks, and executive stock options. The irony of this situation is lost on those who have gutted the American middle class. When you look into the eyes of these people, you see sadness, confusion and embarrassment. They know they can do more. They want to do more. They know they’ve been screwed, but they aren’t sure who to blame. They were once the very customers propelling Lowes’ growth, buying new kitchens, appliances, and power tools. Now they can’t afford a can of paint on their $10 per hour, no benefit retail careers. As depressing as this portrait appears, it is about to get worse.

This Lowes will be shut down and boarded up within the next two years. The parking lot will become a weed infested eyesore occupied by 14 year old skateboarders. One hundred and fifty already down on their luck neighbors will lose their jobs, the township will have a gaping hole in their tax revenue, and the CEO of Lowes will receive a $50 million bonus for his foresight in announcing the closing of 100 stores that he had opened five years before. This exact scenario will play out across suburbia, as our unsustainable system comes undone. Our future path will parallel the course of the labor participation rate. Just as the 9 million Americans who have “left” the labor force since 2008 did not willfully make that choice, the debt burdened American consumer will be dragged kicking and screaming into the new reality of a dramatically reduced standard of living.
gulp

Mooresville, NC

#4 Mar 12, 2013
you just looked into my eyes and I live in the Northeast.
Every day I feel beaten down but now have to "cheer" that "lowes wants to be the number one retailer in the WORLD", this apparantly out of Vegas. Signs everywhere to be my "best every day" ... managers with a "do it and shup the F*** up" attitude.

I'm sad every day, my gut is on fire, but I need this job and will not complain.

What you saw .......... Spot ON.

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5 Mar 12, 2013
look in their eyes wrote:
My trip to my local Lowes last weekend gave me a glimpse into a future of failure and futility. Until 2009, I had four choices of Lowes within 15 miles of my house. There was a store 8 miles east, 12 miles west, 15 miles north, and 15 miles south of my house. In an act of supreme hubris, Lowes opened a store smack in the middle of these four stores, four miles from my house. The Hatfield store opened in early 2009. I insisted it would be a dud and would crush the profitability of the market by cannibalizing the other four stores.
I pulled into the Lowes parking lot at 11:30 am on a Saturday. Big Box retailers do 50% of their business on the weekend. The busiest time frame is from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm on Saturday. Big box retailers build enough parking spots to handle this peak period. The 120,000 square feet Hatfield Lowes has approximately 1,000 parking spaces. I pulled into the spot closest to the entrance during their supposed peak period. There were about 70 cars in the parking lot, with most probably owned by Lowes workers. It is a pleasure to shop in this store, with wide open aisles, and an employee to customer ratio of four to one. The store has 14 checkout lanes and at peak period on a Saturday, there was ONE checkout lane open, with no lines. This is a corporate profit disaster in the making, but the human tragedy far overrides the declining profits of this mega-retailer.
As you walk around this museum of tools and toilets you notice the looks on the faces of the workers. These aren’t the tattooed, face pierced freaks you find in many retail establishments these days. They are my neighbors. They are the beaten down middle class. They are the middle aged professionals who got cast aside by the mega-corporations in the name of efficiency, outsourcing, right sizing, stock buybacks, and executive stock options. The irony of this situation is lost on those who have gutted the American middle class. When you look into the eyes of these people, you see sadness, confusion and embarrassment. They know they can do more. They want to do more. They know they’ve been screwed, but they aren’t sure who to blame. They were once the very customers propelling Lowes’ growth, buying new kitchens, appliances, and power tools. Now they can’t afford a can of paint on their $10 per hour, no benefit retail careers. As depressing as this portrait appears, it is about to get worse.
This Lowes will be shut down and boarded up within the next two years. The parking lot will become a weed infested eyesore occupied by 14 year old skateboarders. One hundred and fifty already down on their luck neighbors will lose their jobs, the township will have a gaping hole in their tax revenue, and the CEO of Lowes will receive a $50 million bonus for his foresight in announcing the closing of 100 stores that he had opened five years before. This exact scenario will play out across suburbia, as our unsustainable system comes undone. Our future path will parallel the course of the labor participation rate. Just as the 9 million Americans who have “left” the labor force since 2008 did not willfully make that choice, the debt burdened American consumer will be dragged kicking and screaming into the new reality of a dramatically reduced standard of living.
spot on, sad, but spot on. The Middle class will continue to get beaten down financially and mentally by the Mega Million CEO's who are raping companies financially.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#6 Mar 12, 2013
Lowe's CEO Sells Near Multiyear High
Robert A. Niblock sold $3.8 million in shares of the home-improvement retailer.
Not long after reached a multiyear high, insiders including the chief executive are nailing down sales.
On March 5, CEO and Chairman Robert A. Niblock sold 97,769 shares of Lowe's (ticker: LOW) for $3,766,196, an average of $38.52 each. Niblock now directly holds 584,566 shares, an amount that represents a stake of less than 1% in the home-improvement retailer.
Niblock indirectly owns 727,767 shares through family members and a 401(k) plan. His most recent previous transaction was on Nov. 30 when he exercised options and sold 335,000 shares for $12 million, an average of $35.85 each.
Gaither M. Keener, chief legal officer, chief compliance officer and secretary, sold 15,973 shares for $614,960, an average of $38.50. Keener followed up by exercising options and selling 70,000 shares for $2,700,383, an average of $38.58 each. The options weren't set to expire until March 1, 2017. Keener also gifted an additional 5,205 shares during this time period.
Keener now directly owns 60,712 Lowe's shares. His most recent previous transaction was on Nov. 29 when he exercised options and sold 28,000 shares for $1 million, an average of $35.93 each.
Niblock has been CEO and chairman since January 2005. Keener, who joined Lowe's in 1985, has held his current positions since May 2012.
http://online.barrons.com/article/SB500014240 ...
submitted by 'The rich get richer" schnecksville PA. in another topic.
See our hard work does pay off, for THEM!
gulp

Mooresville, NC

#7 Mar 12, 2013
But wait, I got my .........$120 last week.
Charleen

Mooresville, NC

#8 Mar 12, 2013
gulp wrote:
But wait, I got my .........$120 last week.
And we'll get out 1 percent raise....yippee
ex-Employee

Brockton, MA

#9 Mar 12, 2013
I'd wager that anyone posting here could find a better job if they started looking now.

Since: Dec 12

Location hidden

#10 Mar 12, 2013
PlantMore Tomatos wrote:
Lowe's CEO Sells Near Multiyear High
Robert A. Niblock sold $3.8 million in shares of the home-improvement retailer.
Not long after reached a multiyear high, insiders including the chief executive are nailing down sales.
On March 5, CEO and Chairman Robert A. Niblock sold 97,769 shares of Lowe's (ticker: LOW) for $3,766,196, an average of $38.52 each. Niblock now directly holds 584,566 shares, an amount that represents a stake of less than 1% in the home-improvement retailer.
Niblock indirectly owns 727,767 shares through family members and a 401(k) plan. His most recent previous transaction was on Nov. 30 when he exercised options and sold 335,000 shares for $12 million, an average of $35.85 each.
Gaither M. Keener, chief legal officer, chief compliance officer and secretary, sold 15,973 shares for $614,960, an average of $38.50. Keener followed up by exercising options and selling 70,000 shares for $2,700,383, an average of $38.58 each. The options weren't set to expire until March 1, 2017. Keener also gifted an additional 5,205 shares during this time period.
Keener now directly owns 60,712 Lowe's shares. His most recent previous transaction was on Nov. 29 when he exercised options and sold 28,000 shares for $1 million, an average of $35.93 each.
Niblock has been CEO and chairman since January 2005. Keener, who joined Lowe's in 1985, has held his current positions since May 2012.
http://online.barrons.com/article/SB500014240 ...
submitted by 'The rich get richer" schnecksville PA. in another topic.
See our hard work does pay off, for THEM!
Why don't you complain about what the Kardashions make? Or Madonna? Or Beiber? Or Tom Brady?

Apply for his job instead of bitch.
look in their eyes

Coplay, PA

#11 Mar 12, 2013
CedricC wrote:
<quoted text>
Why don't you complain about what the Kardashions make? Or Madonna? Or Beiber? Or Tom Brady?
Apply for his job instead of bitch.
Niblock apologist. In denial ^^^^
nedm

Pembroke, MA

#12 Mar 12, 2013
eh. There's plenty of other companies out there that are hiring.

Relative to the population lowes employs what...half a million maybe at most..maybe a quarter. There's 315 million people in the USA. Add in Canada and Mexico and frankly lowes is not a significant employer.

As for walmart frankly they didn't debase or "hurt" things as since when does paying more for anything help?

Some might complain they cannot get far working for walmart. OK fine but how many got far in a mom and pop store? Not many. Like it or not a fair amount of retail in the past went away not so much because of walmart but because of technology.

How much photo development is here vs even 10 years ago?

How many book sales?

How many CD sales?

How many DVD sales?(add in blu ray as well)

Heck how many newspapers and magazines sell well on newsstands these days?

The era of the shopping obsessive baby boomer died a long time ago. When you get older, have more money, more experience, more of an education you realize you don't have to shop like crazy anymore.

No one has to buy things to fit in anymore. The idea of popularity died long ago. No one is impressed with someone elses "stuff". Read Bowling Alone as it hints on this.

What people generally buy these days is food (obviously), clothing (when it wears out), energy (gas/heat/a/c) and taxes. Anything else is extra and can tend to be cut. Say what you will about lowes but at least it is housing. If it was electronics they'd really be screwed. Best Buy has at best a few years left. Radio shack is in the same boat.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#13 Mar 12, 2013
CedricC wrote:
<quoted text>
Why don't you complain about what the Kardashions make? Or Madonna? Or Beiber? Or Tom Brady?
Apply for his job instead of bitch.
I should. I can run a company into the ground for Millions of dollars in pay. No Problem!
Dear Ex Employee

Mooresville, NC

#14 Mar 13, 2013
Yes, sure could, but would have to move many miles away, that's not in the cards at my age. Retirement is soon. Until then, sad eyes or not, I will not let this company lead my life, it's just a stupid job.
csa5-5

Mooresville, NC

#15 Mar 14, 2013
gulp wrote:
you just looked into my eyes and I live in the Northeast.
Every day I feel beaten down but now have to "cheer" that "lowes wants to be the number one retailer in the WORLD", this apparantly out of Vegas. Signs everywhere to be my "best every day" ... managers with a "do it and shup the F*** up" attitude.
I'm sad every day, my gut is on fire, but I need this job and will not complain.
What you saw .......... Spot ON.
The ASMs say you have to be your best every day, BUT have said you won't get the BEST score on the evaluations because it isn't given out, even if earned.
Charleen

Mooresville, NC

#16 Mar 14, 2013
csa5-5 wrote:
<quoted text>
The ASMs say you have to be your best every day, BUT have said you won't get the BEST score on the evaluations because it isn't given out, even if earned.
If they say they are always at there best they are not telling the truth. No one is 100% every day.
Jerry

Columbia, SC

#17 Apr 18, 2013
look in their eyes wrote:
<quoted text>
Niblock apologist. In denial ^^^^
How is the view from under Niblock's desk?
LPM

Mooresville, NC

#18 Apr 24, 2013
Lowes pays you enough to keep your head above water , Oh wait I forgot I had to write a bad check just to get food and gas last week . LOWES only cares about Store managers and above every one eles can be replaced ..
DMxMD

United States

#19 Apr 25, 2013
I'm not saying I wouldn't love it if every job in retail paid much higher, it would have made my life a lot more comfortable earlier on, but I feel I need to remind everyone there is not a single job in a Lowe's store that would be classified by the government as skilled labor. If there is, it would be Class A drivers. Nothing else in the store requires a certification, license, etc.

You can look at the retail career or the employment economy two ways. You can say the Walmart's and Lowes of the world are paying people half of what they deserve, and they are evil and stealing from their workers. Or, you could say if not for the millions of jobs the retail sector provides, many, if not all, of those people would be unemployed because of a complete lack of skills. Retail allows these people to make "some" money doing the only thing they know how. Helping customers, running a register, stocking shelves, etc.

You can talk up your skills and how hard you work, but the truth is, it's not Lowes fault, Walmart's fault, or the governments fault. It's society's fault. Your society does not value education or learning a trade or skill any more. You are teaching your kids to just be mediocre all your life and someone will take care of you. Unfortunately, there are many new young people entering the work force right now finding out the hard way, that no one is going to give them anything for nothing. And even more unfortunately, many older workers who got by in a less competitive era, that are now finding the competition to be stiffer, even for the mid class jobs.
Charleen

United States

#20 Apr 25, 2013
DMxMD wrote:
I'm not saying I wouldn't love it if every job in retail paid much higher, it would have made my life a lot more comfortable earlier on, but I feel I need to remind everyone there is not a single job in a Lowe's store that would be classified by the government as skilled labor. If there is, it would be Class A drivers. Nothing else in the store requires a certification, license, etc.
You can look at the retail career or the employment economy two ways. You can say the Walmart's and Lowes of the world are paying people half of
what they deserve, and they are evil and stealing from their workers. Or, you could say if not for the millions of jobs the retail sector provides, many, if not all, of those people would be unemployed because of a complete lack of skills. Retail allows these people to make "some" money doing the only thing they know how. Helping customers, running a register, stocking shelves, etc.
You can talk up your skills and how hard you work, but the truth is, it's not Lowes fault, Walmart's fault, or the governments fault. It's society's fault. Your society does not value education or learning a trade or skill any more. You are teaching your kids to just be mediocre all your life and someone will take care of you. Unfortunately, there are many new young people entering the work force right now finding out the hard way, that no one is going to give them anything for nothing. And even more unfortunately, many older workers who got by in a less competitive era, that are now finding the competition to be stiffer, even for the mid class jobs.
there's not a job worth the millions CEO's are making. It isn't justifiable except these with the gold make the rules. They are greedy and have convinced themselves they deserve the huge salaries. They would feel different if the show was one the other foot. When a person needs 2-3 jobs to live the wage structure Is out of whack. I don't believe in communism, I believe in fairness. CEO's have convinced themselves that the inequities are valid. Their greediness has skewed judgment. Companies have right for profit, but they also have moral obligation to pay a fair wage to their employees wage where they can live and raise a family. It isn't the govt job, it is business owners.

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