Hot dogs should carry a warning label, lawsuit says

The nonprofit Cancer Project filed a lawsuit today to compel companies to place cancer-risk warning labels on hot dog packages sold in New Jersey. Full Story
Chicago

Robbins, IL

#1 Jul 22, 2009
I think Americans are educated enough to know that over consumption of hot dogs is not healthy. Prepackaged food already comes with a nutrition label. A warning label on hot dogs is just silly.

Since: Jul 09

ingleside il

#2 Jul 22, 2009
Chicago wrote:
I think Americans are educated enough to know that over consumption of hot dogs is not healthy. Prepackaged food already comes with a nutrition label. A warning label on hot dogs is just silly.
you have to draw the line on 'idiot-proofing' at some point...

this IS silly.
mom of 3

Shorewood, IL

#3 Jul 22, 2009
The problem with nitrites isn't only with hotdogs. They are in almost all processed lunchmeats as well. If you think the turkey sandwich you are giving your child for lunch is healthy, read the ingredients. Day after day consumption is certainly NOT a small amount. I go out of my way to make sure my kids eat as few nitrite enhanced products as possible. I, at 37, was diagnosed with colon cancer. I know 2 other women my age who had the same disease. It certainly could not hurt to warn people what potential harm these chemicals cause.
InTheDark

United States

#4 Jul 22, 2009
Two things I was always told you NEVER want to see being made - sausages and laws.

Having been in the visitor's gallery in Springfield, I understand the 'law' part.

Now I get the 'sausage' part, too.

What is the MDR for nitrites?

“You wouldn't understand”

Since: May 09

Dixon, IL

#5 Jul 22, 2009
Oh for the life of Brian, where does it end?

I say *everything* that can be consumed by *any* living being should have one, all-encompassing, universal label:

"Too Much of Anything is Bad For You."

Not much room for litigation there. Translates easily to other languages too.
Rex

New York, NY

#6 Jul 23, 2009
My weiner carrys a warning label!
Pachacutec

Fort Collins, CO

#7 Jul 23, 2009
Sigh.... here we go again. As "Chicago" has posted, processed foods carry nutrition labels. And I really doubt there's anyone at all who thinks that eating hot dogs or ANY processed lunch meats - especially in large quantities - is good for you. So why the need for more labelling? There's labels on cigarettes about smoking, there's labels on alcohol products about responsible drinking, yet people still smoke and people still abuse alcohol consumption. I think the vegan organization just wants this to make their own agenda seem more "noble".
RonMania

Easton, PA

#8 Jul 23, 2009
Gee this week there is no swine flu or hurricanes or nuclear threat, so lets crucify the innocent hotdog & scare the stupid ones among the citizens - LOL
Hatfield doggies

Slatington, PA

#9 Jul 23, 2009
RonMania wrote:
Gee this week there is no swine flu or hurricanes or nuclear threat, so lets crucify the innocent hotdog & scare the stupid ones among the citizens - LOL
Thunderstorms are on the way, as a matter of fact I just had two doggies with some of my chili sauce dam good I must say
Karen

Newport, NH

#10 May 15, 2012
mom of 3 wrote:
The problem with nitrites isn't only with hotdogs. They are in almost all processed lunchmeats as well. If you think the turkey sandwich you are giving your child for lunch is healthy, read the ingredients. Day after day consumption is certainly NOT a small amount. I go out of my way to make sure my kids eat as few nitrite enhanced products as possible. I, at 37, was diagnosed with colon cancer. I know 2 other women my age who had the same disease. It certainly could not hurt to warn people what potential harm these chemicals cause.
Everyone understands processed foods pose a health risk - hotdogs have long been considered among the worst. If you did not take the warning seriously until after you became ill, why would you assume others will. Those who learn in time to prevent illnesses have already adopted healthy lifestyles. The rest of the population will continue to eat (and smoke and drink) without any understanding or care to the damage they cause themselves - until they are also diagnosed. Please don't insult society by assuming there is any adult who is ignorant as to the health risks of processed foods. Accept it for what it is - "it won't happen to me" syndrome.
Tapestry

Allentown, PA

#13 May 15, 2012
Karen wrote:
<quoted text>
Everyone understands processed foods pose a health risk - hotdogs have long been considered among the worst. If you did not take the warning seriously until after you became ill, why would you assume others will. Those who learn in time to prevent illnesses have already adopted healthy lifestyles. The rest of the population will continue to eat (and smoke and drink) without any understanding or care to the damage they cause themselves - until they are also diagnosed. Please don't insult society by assuming there is any adult who is ignorant as to the health risks of processed foods. Accept it for what it is - "it won't happen to me" syndrome.
I agree, although, some people need a warning as plain as day before it really sinks in. I'm concerned about global food control. It's getting harder to find organic produce. Potatoes are the worst thing you can eat, unless they're grown organically. Pesticides and chemicals have caused so many health issues, particularly among children. Child cancers and Autism are increasing more and more. Monsanto rules over much of the food control in the world. They are the leaders in genetically manipulated foods. Vegetables were meant to be in their true natural form, but they've been genetically altered to resist insect infestation and rotting. The alteration creates a chemical compound very similar to a pesticide and acts as a poison when consumed. That doesn't mean you're going to drop dead from eating these altered foods, but consuming them over time, does have an effect in our bodies. Monsanto will never admit to that, but it's true. If you can't find organic in your supermarket, which has become very limited, if not non-existent, then buy locally or grow some of your favorite vegetable and fruits if you're able to.

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