Resident Commissioner files Puerto Ri...

Resident Commissioner files Puerto Rico status bill in Congress

There are 36 comments on the www.caribbeanbusinesspr.com story from May 19, 2009, titled Resident Commissioner files Puerto Rico status bill in Congress. In it, www.caribbeanbusinesspr.com reports that:

Resident Commissioner Pedro Pierluisi filed a Puerto Rico status bill in the U.S. House of Representatives Tuesday with the support of 86 co-sponsors.

The four-page Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2009 authorizes the island government to hold a referendum in which voters will choose whether or not they think Puerto Rico should continue its current status.

If voters choose that Puerto Rico keep the same status, then the local government is authorized to hold a vote every eight years to determine if public opinion has changed.

If voters say they want a change in status, then a second vote would be held in which voters can choose between statehood, independence and a third option of sovereignty in association with the United States that is not subject to the territorial clause.

Pierluisi said that the costs of the vote would be assumed by the local government to avoid a potential roadblock to the legislation in Congress. The bill does not specify when the votes would be held.

Despite the apparent widespread support the three representatives who are Puerto Rican – U.S. Reps. José Serrano, Nydia Velázquez and Luis Gutiérrez – have not signed on to support the measure.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said that status legislation needs “consensus” among Puerto Rican Democrats in the House in order to move forward.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.caribbeanbusinesspr.com.

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Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#1 May 19, 2009
This Fortuño guy continues to deceive its electoral basis, it has taken his administration forever to pay any attention to the status issue.
Factchecker

Indianapolis, IN

#2 May 19, 2009
"U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said that status legislation needs “consensus” among Puerto Rican Democrats in the House in order to move forward."

It looks like there IS consensus among Puerto Rican Democrats in the House--'...the three representatives who are Puerto Rican...have not signed on to support the measure.'

*******

"Pierluisi said that the costs of the vote would be assumed by the local government to avoid a potential roadblock to the legislation in Congress."

Of course, if the local government could afford to fund the vote there wouldn't be any NEED for a bill in the US Congress. The PNP has the votes in the ELA legislature to pass any bill for any vote they WANT to take if 'the costs of the vote would be assumed by the local government.'

At least we know why 'the bill does not specify when the votes would be held.'

As Yankee has said on some other topic, the bill "is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing." (Shakespeare, from "Macbeth")
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#3 May 19, 2009
¿Y qué se puede esperar de congresistas pro permanencia de la colonia como la Velázquez?

El dientú de Chicago tiene sus intereses con la comunidad mejicana, así que los Boricuas no son prioridad.

Vamos a ver qué dice Serrano.

Pero, independientemente de lo que digan estos tres que no representan nuestros intereses en el congreso, Puerto Rico debe continuar con el derrotero trazado por el gobierno actual.

Experimentaremos un alza en las protestas del mov. obrero, agitado por los populares, un alza en la violencia contra el gobierno actual, pero ya la colonia tiene sus días contados (desde que inició el conteo regresivo en 1995).

Jorge

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#4 May 19, 2009
Well, let us see how far this goes. The past local votes equaled a waste of money, energy and time. I am afraid if the Populares don't participate this next round of votes if it ever blossoms it will be claimed by their supporters in Congress as a void exercise.

In reference to the 3 "Boricuas" types in Congress they have no say in the island's affairs. They gave that up when they moved or decided to stay in the mainland to represent their districts just like I did when I retired here. I really believe that nothing will get done and we will still be trying to decide what we want when the second coming starts. Even St. Pete would throw his arms up in disbelief with our lack of bravery in deciding a better life for our future generation. Dios nos coja confesao!!!
Factchecker

Indianapolis, IN

#5 May 19, 2009
Jorge,

No one really believes the three 'Puerto Rican' representatives represent Puerto Rico. They raise campaign funds from Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans.

That is what the 'faithful' are for. To provide funds to the 'priesthood.' So has it always been. So shall it always be.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#6 May 19, 2009
MataConHacha wrote:
Well, let us see how far this goes. The past local votes equaled a waste of money, energy and time. I am afraid if the Populares don't participate this next round of votes if it ever blossoms it will be claimed by their supporters in Congress as a void exercise.
In reference to the 3 "Boricuas" types in Congress they have no say in the island's affairs. They gave that up when they moved or decided to stay in the mainland to represent their districts just like I did when I retired here. I really believe that nothing will get done and we will still be trying to decide what we want when the second coming starts. Even St. Pete would throw his arms up in disbelief with our lack of bravery in deciding a better life for our future generation. Dios nos coja confesao!!!
The Gutierrez fella' was born and raised in Chicago, Serrano and that lady from Humacao certainly exercised a choice. But, all in all, referendums will come and go, until a final decision is reached, for this "cogida de pendejos que nos dieron en los 50's", costs far too much money, que el que se pueda gastar en estas consultas. Y mientras los perros sigan ladrando, vamos por buen camino...
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#7 May 19, 2009
Factchecker wrote:
Jorge,
No one really believes the three 'Puerto Rican' representatives represent Puerto Rico. They raise campaign funds from Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans.
That is what the 'faithful' are for. To provide funds to the 'priesthood.' So has it always been. So shall it always be.
I know, I know...but as you always say, we're talking about politicians here...I'm just playing for the bleachers (como decimos en español, so that my party thinks we're all one and the same. You should know me by now.

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#8 May 20, 2009
I keep hearing the argument that Puerto Rico will loose its Spanish culture if it became a state.
Puerto Rico when it says its "Spanish Culture," it means the culture from the days of the Spanish Inquistition. Not the Spanish culture of today which made gay marriage legal and has government for the middle and lower classes.

Today's Puerto Rico is more like the pathetic Republican Party (GOP - Going Obsolete Party) of today. It is still for the oligarchy and the middle and lower classes be damned. It is controlled by the Church. There is little - perhaps, no -- Separation of Church and State.

Like a whore many status quo Puerto Ricans hate the United States while it still takes money from the United States. It is time to do it or get off the pot!!! Become a state or become independent!!!

Since: Sep 08

Humacao, Puerto Rico

#9 May 20, 2009
Don't you find it strange that Nancy Pelosi says three Puerto Ricans living in the US should decide the fate of whether 4 million people can vote or not. What are they God, Jesus, and the Holy Ghost? I would think 4 million island wide Puerto Ricans would be outraged at this.

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#10 May 20, 2009
Upfront Yankee wrote:
I keep hearing the argument that Puerto Rico will loose its Spanish culture if it became a state.
Puerto Rico when it says its "Spanish Culture," it means the culture from the days of the Spanish Inquistition. Not the Spanish culture of today which made gay marriage legal and has government for the middle and lower classes.
Today's Puerto Rico is more like the pathetic Republican Party (GOP - Going Obsolete Party) of today. It is still for the oligarchy and the middle and lower classes be damned. It is controlled by the Church. There is little - perhaps, no -- Separation of Church and State.
Like a whore many status quo Puerto Ricans hate the United States while it still takes money from the United States. It is time to do it or get off the pot!!! Become a state or become independent!!!
I will 81 on May 23. However, I have a mentality more like the younger generations. I refuse to become an old fussy fart. I love art films. I can be really intellectual and a heavy thinker. I also enjoy the illogical, off-the-wall films enjoyed by the younger generation both in the states and here in Puerto Rico.

Recently, I saw "Angels and Demons" and "Star Trek" at Plaza Las Americas. Over seventy-five percent of the audience were teenagers and in the twenties year olds. They were the younger generation and Puerto Rican.

Despite the Spanish sub-titles, this audience of the younger generation of Puerto Ricans were more American than I am especially during Star Trek. This younger generation represent the future political leaders of Puerto Rico. In another ten years or so, Puerto Rico will be governed by Puerto Ricans with mentalities more American than Spanish.

There is no "Spanish Culture" among young Puerto Ricans. They are truly American to the core. They love American movie stars, baseball players, pop singers, American Idols, etc., etc., etc. The fruitless battle to keep Puerto Ricans Spanish is lost or on the way to being lost. They want to be American all the way!!!
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#11 May 20, 2009
Well, to my surprise, the Spanish can't get over the loss of Cuba and the Phillipines. When I asked them, what about Puerto Rico,(and I'm talking all over mainland Spain (excluding the Canary Isls.), all Spaniards (at least the ones I met and came to interact), all had the same reaction-..."...Puerto what? Those people were so ingrates, they were so eager to embrace the Americans..."

In fact, your average Puerto Rican, although acknowledges its heritage, do not revere Spain as the rest of Latin America does. We loath the Castilian accent (though could care less about the Andalucian and Canary one, for obvious reasons). Spain resents that.

So, why are we still speaking Spanish? For many reasons, other than our love for Spain, and all things Spanish. I was sent to study there because we still have family in Madrid, cousins of my father have married into Spanish families (franquistas-if I may add, still longing for the Caudillo and now members of the PP, but I digress).

When the U.S. took over our sovereignty it closed our borders, in total isolation (from the world). Cuba, on the other hand (and following colonial policies of racial balance) continued with an open door towards Spain. That's why we have so many Cubans with Spanish immediate family (parents, grandpas', uncles, etc.), millions if I may add.

So, why is Puerto Ricans obsession with said language?

It was the spearhead (for the first three decades of the 20th century) of the pro independence movt. agaisnt the impossision of English (a la trágala) by the new colonial power. Then, it was embraced by the Puerto Ricans political parties as a bargaining tool.

When Puerto Rican forced diaspora was in its full swing-from 1900-60's, it was our way of "getting even" agaisnt the discrimination and prejudice encountered (especially in U.S. Norhteastern urban centers).

So, motivations, with history as our witness, are as varied and numerous as there are Puerto Ricans. But, we can exclude love for Spain among the main ones.

For the past thirty years or so, the pro associated state government has embraced Spanish as their main "caballito de guerra", as it happened before with the pro independentistas, as a way of decelerating the statehood movement.

It is part of the "ideological civil war" that has been going on in our islands (for the past 111 yrs.), which keeps draining our coffers, energies, creativity, and initiatives.

Lets see if history, with the necessary distance, agrees with me.
Free Puerto Rico

Flushing, NY

#12 May 20, 2009
MataConHacha wrote:
Well, let us see how far this goes. The past local votes equaled a waste of money, energy and time. I am afraid if the Populares don't participate this next round of votes if it ever blossoms it will be claimed by their supporters in Congress as a void exercise.
In reference to the 3 "Boricuas" types in Congress they have no say in the island's affairs. They gave that up when they moved or decided to stay in the mainland to represent their districts just like I did when I retired here. I really believe that nothing will get done and we will still be trying to decide what we want when the second coming starts. Even St. Pete would throw his arms up in disbelief with our lack of bravery in deciding a better life for our future generation. Dios nos coja confesao!!!
I am ashamed of you when you consider "Borica" in the U.S. not representative of Puerto Rico. In fact it was becuase of Luis Munoz Marin policies which lead the massive immigration from the Island to the United States. Are you excluding the millions of Puerto Ricans living in the U.S.? I mean it was the policies of both "Democratically" elected people in Puerto Rico which implemented policies that benifeted the United States instead of Puerto Rico. Forcing a huge migration towards the Mainland. I feel they can represent the Puerto Rican diaspora becuase of the failure in our own government to establish an economically dependent vibrant economy. Both of your parties commonwealth and statehooders will and have never improved our economy. Instead we have been leeches to the Amemrica system. Making our population into submissive wealthfare recipients. Be ashamed of yourselves because that is all you inspire our people to be. The parties have continue Puerto Rico regression. And this bill is bullshit when you have the option of commonwealth still embedded. Take that part of the billout its been hundreds of years already. Death to Colonialism!
Free Puerto Rico

Flushing, NY

#13 May 20, 2009
Upfront Yankee wrote:
<quoted text>
I will 81 on May 23. However, I have a mentality more like the younger generations. I refuse to become an old fussy fart. I love art films. I can be really intellectual and a heavy thinker. I also enjoy the illogical, off-the-wall films enjoyed by the younger generation both in the states and here in Puerto Rico.
Recently, I saw "Angels and Demons" and "Star Trek" at Plaza Las Americas. Over seventy-five percent of the audience were teenagers and in the twenties year olds. They were the younger generation and Puerto Rican.
Despite the Spanish sub-titles, this audience of the younger generation of Puerto Ricans were more American than I am especially during Star Trek. This younger generation represent the future political leaders of Puerto Rico. In another ten years or so, Puerto Rico will be governed by Puerto Ricans with mentalities more American than Spanish.
There is no "Spanish Culture" among young Puerto Ricans. They are truly American to the core. They love American movie stars, baseball players, pop singers, American Idols, etc., etc., etc. The fruitless battle to keep Puerto Ricans Spanish is lost or on the way to being lost. They want to be American all the way!!!
We appreciate your insightful story of how Puerto Ricans are willing to give up there homeland to be part of the American melting pot. But do you really think that Puerto Ricans want to give up there flag to replace it for an American flag? Its not all about just the Spanish language, its about the rice and beans. Its about Cotto fighting and waving the Puerto Rican flag. Its about Puerto Rico baseball team leaving the American baseball team 7 to zip. Its about Puerto Rican playing basketball against the United States. Its about Ms. Puerto Rico up there among all the other Latin American nations. Its about the Puerto Rican culture and heritage. Its about going on paradas and waking people up in the morning. Its about listening to the roosters in the morning and listening to the coqui in the night. Its about grabbing a palma tree leaf and using it as an umbrella. Its about Puerto Rican rum and the name it self. Becuase no matter what happens and no matter what nation invades us. We will continue to inspire to be Boricua. We will continue to listen to salsa, celebrate three kings day, relajar y hablar espanol. No matter where you place us you will always no notice a Puerto Rican! The ketchup on our rice and the avocado next to our cuisine. The Puerto Rican people have a swagga about them and its comes from the our birthplace. No matter how far away we are from our homeland, no matter how much American society tries to make us assimilate. We will always be in Nature Boricua. There is no institution, system, or written history that can tell us otherwise. La fiesta patronalize y el cafe borican con las cajetas. Bendicion, te saludo Cezear como los gladiators en el collisium we salute you. Rome will fall and we shall stand!

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#14 May 20, 2009
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
The Gutierrez fella' was born and raised in Chicago, Serrano and that lady from Humacao certainly exercised a choice. But, all in all, referendums will come and go, until a final decision is reached, for this "cogida de pendejos que nos dieron en los 50's", costs far too much money, que el que se pueda gastar en estas consultas. Y mientras los perros sigan ladrando, vamos por buen camino...
Jorge,

I know, I just did not want to get into el dientu' not being born or raised on the island. What is so funny is that he is a fanatical defender of independence and yet fights for the "rights" of his constituents in Chicago land and those that are illegally here in this country. The dude has no ethical compass when he denies the rights of American citizens of the island.

La cogida de "pendejo en los 50" might not be that accurate, remember you can only be cogido como pendejo if you are informed and educated and still fall for something. Many on the island were humble poor jibaros who supported with the help of the Feds the "Free Associated State of Puerto Rico." However, in this day in age I truly believe that the PPD has and continues de coger muchos pendejos on the island who support a la porqueria de ELA. But in the end we who vote for politicians that do nothing on the national level to fix la porqueria (island politicians) deserve what they get..porqueria y cogida de pendejos.

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#15 May 20, 2009
Free Puerto Rico wrote:
<quoted text>
We appreciate your insightful story of how Puerto Ricans are willing to give up there homeland to be part of the American melting pot. But do you really think that Puerto Ricans want to give up there flag to replace it for an American flag? Its not all about just the Spanish language, its about the rice and beans. Its about Cotto fighting and waving the Puerto Rican flag. Its about Puerto Rico baseball team leaving the American baseball team 7 to zip. Its about Puerto Rican playing basketball against the United States. Its about Ms. Puerto Rico up there among all the other Latin American nations. Its about the Puerto Rican culture and heritage. Its about going on paradas and waking people up in the morning. Its about listening to the roosters in the morning and listening to the coqui in the night. Its about grabbing a palma tree leaf and using it as an umbrella. Its about Puerto Rican rum and the name it self. Becuase no matter what happens and no matter what nation invades us. We will continue to inspire to be Boricua. We will continue to listen to salsa, celebrate three kings day, relajar y hablar espanol. No matter where you place us you will always no notice a Puerto Rican! The ketchup on our rice and the avocado next to our cuisine. The Puerto Rican people have a swagga about them and its comes from the our birthplace. No matter how far away we are from our homeland, no matter how much American society tries to make us assimilate. We will always be in Nature Boricua. There is no institution, system, or written history that can tell us otherwise. La fiesta patronalize y el cafe borican con las cajetas. Bendicion, te saludo Cezear como los gladiators en el collisium we salute you. Rome will fall and we shall stand!
Nene, as you age and mature dignity is more important then sports and superfluous titles to make us feel good for a little bit.

Now, what melting pot are you talking about? Is there a melting pot in el barrio de Nueva yor? Is there a melting pot in Orlando and kissimmee,Fl? How about Germantown, Philadelphia? Not to mention other parts where Boricuas live and still continue to be Boricuas.

I must differ with your "melting pot" claim. This country has two major languages, guess which ones are they? And if you travel to major cities around the country like Washington D.C. you can hear Japanese, Korean, etc, etc on the radio...are these examples of a melting pot? I think we are more of a salad all contributing to a very interesting taste to the national palate.

Again having dignity over sports is more important. We are either part of the nation that is running us or we request a divorce and live on our own. I prefer an equal partnership, but I don't mine if we were on our own that way we can be our own one vegetable salad and our own "melting pot."

PS...I go every year on Parandas and guess what? More here then I did on the island when I lived within the culture. I am proud, but realistic.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#16 May 20, 2009
MataConHacha:

I think you once told me you're a teacher, well I can tell you are one. A great point of view, different interpretation of historical facts. And this is only the begining, the new Puerto Rican history.

I'm talking from my own social class, for my father, was one who believed in the new, exciting Puerto Rico of the late 1940's. He had recently graduated from a U.S. college (in 1950), was Panamá bound-with an officer rank to train Puerto Rican troops en route to Korea, until '53.

My mother, had also graduated from H.S.(Santurce's Central High, class of '52), entered the UPR, met my Dad in 53, they got married in '54 and she left college, upon getting pregnant with me on '55.

Their first newlywed apartment, was in Miramar, and when Mom got pregnant with my sister in '59, moved to a Río Piedras suburb. That was modernity then, both had all the faith in the Associated State.

Then in 1992, both had the rug pulled out from under their feet, when Hernandez Colón admitted that the "associated state" lacked the necessary democratic tools for a much needed development.

In 2007, Acevedo Vilá admitted to the colonial status of the associated state.

As it happened to my parents, hundreds of thousands of middle class Puerto Ricans had been deceived by their political party since 1948.

The statehood and pro independence movements had been telling the truth all this time.

Jorge

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#17 May 20, 2009
Free Puerto Rico,
Again Nene or Nena..I call you that because you seem to be a very young romantic mainland independentista (I might be wrong on the mainland). Because you espouse very naive statements. Let me dissect and answer each of your assertions in two parts.

Part 1.

1. "I am ashamed of you when you consider "Borica" in the U.S. not representative of Puerto Rico."

You mean "Boricua" right?(Poking fun here) Let me regress. Not one of the Puerto Ricans of blood or born and now living in the mainland as Congressmen and woman do nothing for the 3.8 million Boricuas on the island. They do not represent us they represent their constituents of their districts. They can say all they want, but in the end they are puchi pluma na'ma. If they really "represented" los Boricuas as you claim they would have signed on to get the ball rolling in Congress and on the island, but in the end they are for their agendas and not ours.

2. "Are you excluding the millions of Puerto Ricans living in the U.S.? I mean it was the policies of both parties"

Well, for one thing many of the millions of Puerto Ricans in the States are in many cases second, third and even forth generation who cannot carry a good Spanish conversation without interjecting Spanglish like rufo, marqueta y yarda, but do a mean PR Flag wave and say Vaya and Coño a lot. Many only spewed the talking points of the Puerto Rican Young Lords of the 1960s screaming in the streets of New York and many cities in the mainland “Puerto Rico libre” and yet could not recite a famous revolutionary poem of Lola Rodriguez de Tío..La Borinqueña. So many of the now Boricuas that live on the mainland only know of Puerto Rico because it is a nice summer or Christmas vacation. I remember a lot of the "nueyorican" calling us "peps" in Cabo Rojo in the 80s because they spoke "perfect English" and we had an accent. We would tell them one of many sayings of the island "Entran por arrimaos y quieren salir por duenos" and I would get a look like what?

3. "Forcing a huge migration towards the Mainland. I feel they can represent the Puerto Rican diaspora becuase of the failure in our own government to establish an economically dependent vibrant economy"

You know if there wasn't a massive immigration where would you stick 8 million people on an island that is 100 miles long and 35 wide? Just think of it...El que no tiene dinga tiene mandinga. Either way we would migrate no matter what. We did have a vibrant economy, but there were not enough jobs to fulfill the demand in starting in the 1950s, but you can only grow so much when there is not enough work for the demand. I know I have lived it!

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#18 May 20, 2009
Part 2

4. "we have been leeches to the Amemrica system. Making our population into submissive wealthfare recipients. Be ashamed of yourselves because that is all you inspire our people to be."
Have we? According to any dictionary "leeches" live off a host. Puerto Ricans have contributed a lot to the American nation and likewise the U.S. has with us because we are American Citizens. We are more then a lamenting chest beating bunch of lost souls. Let us get off that mentality. I don’t dispute there are unos vagos, but a dignified Boricua is proactive and not reactive who moans and groans of the situation. When we decide we don't want to continue to be American Citizens I will support the separation. I don't want Puerto Rico to be a welfare state, blame that on the politicians of all parties and the paternal, socialistic attitudes of government since Don Luis due to good intentions, but misguided ones. I want Boricuas to demand respect, work, stand on their own two feet and be PROUD no matter where they are or what they want to eventually be; separate or full partners in the American trek towards true justice.
5.“And this bill is bullshit when you have the option of commonwealth still embedded. Take that part of the billout its been hundreds of years already. Death to Colonialism!”
I agree death to colonialism!!! We either do it or get off the pot! The current bill awaiting committee approval states that if island votes for the continuation of the current “status quo or decide to change a future vote would include an associated republic not the current so-call Commonwealth. If you like you can read the current bill for yourself at: http://pierluisi.house.gov/home.html .
However the current bill has no guarantee that it will be voted on by either house let alone come out of committee.

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#19 May 24, 2009
I just read while on my travels south of the border that the Populares are lobbying in Washington that they will not support the bill that is being considered in committee. They just cannot get it and with the House leader Pelosi saying she will not support the bill if there is not a full support in Puerto Rico for it then it might not be considered. There you go the bill will probably die if the PPD and the Speaker does not support it. I am writing the Speaker and my Representative where I live and express my disgust with their lack of really implementing a government of justice for those living on the island to express themselves without BS options. Write, complain and demand a chance for Puerto Rico!!! I will keep you posted on my efforts when I get back to the States.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#20 May 24, 2009
Hola MataConHacha:

Was it any surprise that pro associate state reps. lobby agaisnt the bill?

Do you know what will happen if there's a status change with the territory of Puerto Rico in the U.S.?

The island's local govt. has stated the regardless the support or lack of in congress-"el referendum va".

53% of the island's electorate demand all the duties and benefits as any state in the Union.

Jorge

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