United Auto Workers in Claycomo appro...

United Auto Workers in Claycomo approve Ford contract

There are 60 comments on the The Topeka Capital-Journal story from Nov 12, 2007, titled United Auto Workers in Claycomo approve Ford contract. In it, The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that:

“We look forward to turning Ford Motor Company around.”

United Auto Workers at the Ford Motor Co. plant hear have overwhelmingly approved a four-year labor agreement. via The Topeka Capital-Journal

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Topeka Capital-Journal.

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Since: Feb 07

Village of Claycomo, MO

#42 Mar 19, 2008
intrepid wrote:
<quoted text>
Just remember this Kansas, auto jobs in Canada are union,C.A.W., and we buy what we build, we are consumers of a hell of a lot of American product so don't lump us into the same category as some mexican living in a mud & grass hut working for 50cents a day, and sending finished product to the States while not being able to buy it himself. That's Mexico not Canada. BIG ASS DIFFERENCE!! We work, make decent livings, pay taxes, drive cars and buy houses just like you guys. We don't try to climb barbed wire to get into your country, we go over to buy groceries and party!! Just wanted to set the record straight. We are you...with a Touque on! LOL! Peace.
And peace to you, our friendly neighbor to the north. I am a big fan of The Red Green Show, which I believe eminated out of Ontario. We should also not forget to mention, the big boned girl from Alberta, with the big voice and talent, k.d.lang (lower case her choice).
mike

Indianapolis, IN

#43 May 3, 2008
The United Auto Workers union is close to reaching an agreement with American Axle & Manufacturing that will accept company demands on every major issue, including cutting wages and closing at least two plants. More than 3,600 workers have been on strike at AAM for ten weeks.

Details of the agreement have been reported on blogs run by American Axle workers and in the media. The Detroit Free Press reported on Thursday that a framework for a settlement was near, and would include the closure of two plants, substantially lower pay for all workers, and the breaking up of the national agreement into separate plant-by-plant contracts. The newspaper cited “people briefed on the talks” as the source for its information. Talks are expected to continue throughout the weekend.

According to the Free Press, wages would be cut to $17 an hour for production workers,$14 for non-production workers, and $25.50 for skilled trades workers.

Before the strike, American Axle workers earned $28.15 an hour, with skilled trades at more than $30 an hour. The terms outlined above would mean a pay cut of between $11 and $14 an hour (or upwards of $25,000 a year) for most workers.

Prior to the strike, the UAW had agreed to substantial wage cuts that would have given workers a few dollars an hour more than what they would receive under the framework reported by the Free Press.

Two forging plants would be closed—at Tonawanda, New York, and in Detroit, Michigan. A third plant in Three Rivers, Michigan could also be closed.
Shutting down the Detroit forge plant would mean the loss of hundreds more jobs in a city that has been devastated by the decline of the US auto industry and the outsourcing of labor to cheaper locations in the US and internationally.

The closure of the Tonawnada plant would likely mean the end of American Axle’s operations in the Buffalo, New York area, further devastating a region that, like Detroit, has been hit by the destruction of its manufacturing base. Tonawanda employs about 400 workers, and a companion finishing plant, whose future existence is also questionable, employs about 110. Last year, American Axle idled a plant in Buffalo that once employed over 2,000 workers.

According to reports on blogs run by American Axle workers, the company was prepared to keep the forge plants open if the workers accepted $10-$14 an hour wages for production workers. If the forges are shut, the work there will be replaced by low-wage plants in the US and Mexico.

The closure of these plants will leave only two remaining—the manufacturing facilities in Detroit and Three Rivers, provided that the latter remains open. Extremely significant is the proposal to break up the remaining plants into separate contracts. This framework, which has been adopted by the UAW at other auto parts suppliers, would serve to pit the different plants against each other in a competition for lower wages and benefits, under the threat of closure.

AAM is reportedly threatening to close Three Rivers in one year if the concessions are not high enough. The company is insisting on a clause that would allow it to shut the plant down if the company’s financial situation worsens.

Over the past 25 years, the UAW has worked to impose concessions by blocking any mobilization of workers across the auto industry. Separate contracts are negotiated at separate companies, and concessions at one become the foundation for demanding concessions at another. This model is now being extended within each company itself, as a means of breaking up any solidarity among the rank-and-file.

READ MORE: http://futureoftheunion.com/...
ford sucks

United States

#44 May 3, 2008
all uaw deserve no more than 4.50$an hour
mike

Indianapolis, IN

#45 May 4, 2008
www.futureoftheunion.com

THE FUTURE OF THE UAW IS IN YOUR HANDS!
George Kingfish Stevens

Thiensville, WI

#46 May 4, 2008
mike wrote:
The United Auto Workers union is close to reaching an agreement with American Axle & Manufacturing that will accept company demands on every major issue, including cutting wages and closing at least two plants. More than 3,600 workers have been on strike at AAM for ten weeks.
Details of the agreement have been reported on blogs run by American Axle workers and in the media. The Detroit Free Press reported on Thursday that a framework for a settlement was near, and would include the closure of two plants, substantially lower pay for all workers, and the breaking up of the national agreement into separate plant-by-plant contracts. The newspaper cited “people briefed on the talks” as the source for its information. Talks are expected to continue throughout the weekend.
According to the Free Press, wages would be cut to $17 an hour for production workers,$14 for non-production workers, and $25.50 for skilled trades workers.
Before the strike, American Axle workers earned $28.15 an hour, with skilled trades at more than $30 an hour. The terms outlined above would mean a pay cut of between $11 and $14 an hour (or upwards of $25,000 a year) for most workers.
Prior to the strike, the UAW had agreed to substantial wage cuts that would have given workers a few dollars an hour more than what they would receive under the framework reported by the Free Press.
Two forging plants would be closed—at Tonawanda, New York, and in Detroit, Michigan. A third plant in Three Rivers, Michigan could also be closed.
Shutting down the Detroit forge plant would mean the loss of hundreds more jobs in a city that has been devastated by the decline of the US auto industry and the outsourcing of labor to cheaper locations in the US and internationally.
The closure of the Tonawnada plant would likely mean the end of American Axle’s operations in the Buffalo, New York area, further devastating a region that, like Detroit, has been hit by the destruction of its manufacturing base. Tonawanda employs about 400 workers, and a companion finishing plant, whose future existence is also questionable, employs about 110. Last year, American Axle idled a plant in Buffalo that once employed over 2,000 workers.
According to reports on blogs run by American Axle workers, the company was prepared to keep the forge plants open if the workers accepted $10-$14 an hour wages for production workers. If the forges are shut, the work there will be replaced by low-wage plants in the US and Mexico.
The closure of these plants will leave only two remaining—the manufacturing facilities in Detroit and Three Rivers, provided that the latter remains open. Extremely significant is the proposal to break up the remaining plants into separate contracts. This framework, which has been adopted by the UAW at other auto parts suppliers, would serve to pit the different plants against each other in a competition for lower wages and benefits, under the threat of closure.
AAM is reportedly threatening to close Three Rivers in one year if the concessions are not high enough. The company is insisting on a clause that would allow it to shut the plant down if the company’s financial situation worsens.
Over the past 25 years, the UAW has worked to impose concessions by blocking any mobilization of workers across the auto industry. Separate contracts are negotiated at separate companies, and concessions at one become the foundation for demanding concessions at another. This model is now being extended within each company itself, as a means of breaking up any solidarity among the rank-and-file.
READ MORE: http://futureoftheunion.com/...
Thank goodnez for cut n paste! I be mighty impressed wid your computin ability and de good informashun, thanks Mr.Mike.
George Kingfish Stevens

Thiensville, WI

#47 May 4, 2008
By de way Mr.Mike, did you be gettin bored wid politics? I am glad you be back to posting agin, you be the greatest.

Since: Feb 07

Village of Claycomo, MO

#48 Jun 21, 2010
George Kingfish Stevens wrote:
By de way Mr.Mike, did you be gettin bored wid politics? I am glad you be back to posting agin, you be the greatest.
I second that.
time traveler

Mabank, TX

#49 Jun 23, 2010
Have you ford employees hear about the new FORD pant to be build in Thailand??? Yes, Ford is going to invest 450 Million dollars there and hire 2200 employees. Guess the good old USA will miss out on that job opportunity. Another off shoring of jobs and autmotive parts. more cheap labor.

Since: Feb 07

Village of Claycomo, MO

#50 Jun 24, 2010
time traveler wrote:
Have you ford employees hear about the new FORD pant to be build in Thailand???
Ford pants? Are the going into manufacturing imported clothing now?
time traveler

United States

#51 Jun 24, 2010
bUT fORD is going to thailand to build cars and where FORD will create 2200 jobs , jobs we need here.

Since: Feb 07

Village of Claycomo, MO

#52 Jun 30, 2010
time traveler wrote:
bUT fORD is going to thailand to build cars and where FORD will create 2200 jobs , jobs we need here.
-Please document where you heard this information.
-You cannot, so please deal with only facts that can be substantiated, not idle "over the fence' house wife gossip.
time traveeler

Grand Prairie, TX

#53 Jul 1, 2010
IDIOT, I saw it myself in a mag on the news standand bought the mag to read. May stilll have itif so will get the info for you. Ford is spending over 450 million doalrs there. And Iread the articile myself. Believe it or not I do not work for fors and will not loose my job over it.
time traveeler

Grand Prairie, TX

#54 Jul 1, 2010
Was just wondering if anyone working for Ford had any info on the move and if they had shut down a plant some where. Or maybe in the future. they were going to built a small car there.
time traveeler

Grand Prairie, TX

#55 Jul 1, 2010
Idiot, thats one reason I do not buy foreign made cars they put Americans out of work, the same reason that auto manufacturers have so much trouble on recalls-- foreign imports of parts made in foreign sweat shops. I am still driving my old 78 and 84 chevy trucks. My brother in law drove his 74 chevy PU and put over 800, 000 miles on it. It finally rusted apart.

Since: Feb 07

Village of Claycomo, MO

#56 Jul 2, 2010
time traveeler wrote:
IDIOT, I saw it myself in a mag on the news standand bought the mag to read. May stilll have itif so will get the info for you. Ford is spending over 450 million doalrs there. And Iread the articile myself. Believe it or not I do not work for fors and will not loose my job over it.
Thank you, I would really like to see that information and their references to document their report.Just let me know the publication title, date and issue number. I have unlimited resources to look it up so no need for me to have a hard copy.
Thanks again, I appreciate your input!

Since: Feb 07

Village of Claycomo, MO

#57 Jul 2, 2010
time traveeler wrote:
Idiot, thats one reason I do not buy foreign made cars they put Americans out of work, the same reason that auto manufacturers have so much trouble on recalls-- foreign imports of parts made in foreign sweat shops. I am still driving my old 78 and 84 chevy trucks. My brother in law drove his 74 chevy PU and put over 800, 000 miles on it. It finally rusted apart.
I too am a proponent of United States products and have accumulated a love for the F-250 I presently own. But I don't believe I have owned a better overall vehicle than my still roadworthy 1976 Mercedes-Benz 240D, which by the way I am proud to say, I have finally received my Star and Laurel radiator grill badge High Mileage award from Mercedes-Benz for one million miles. I have kept many local dealerships busy buying service and parts and untold gallons of petrol! But still my favorite mode of transportation remains an old (late 60's) French 10-speed Peugeot touring bicycle!
Time traveler

United States

#58 Jul 5, 2010
Idiot, I have noticed that wages just keep going on down and down. Pretty soon if things keep going the way they are, the corporations will be asking us to work for zero wages and no paycheck just ot keep a job. Bet Ford asked their employees to lower their wages to keep their jobs. I know an experienced dozer operator that his wages has dropped from 27$$$ per hour to $10. 50 per hour. Lower wages are killing the working class people who sweat for a living. they keep getting lower and lower as unemployeement goes up. I am looking for a greaater recession ahead of us in the near future. I can only hope that I am wrong. Seems every body is losing money on their retirement invstments except the wall street bankers and CEOs My doctors said they lost 50 and 60 percent of their retirements by the endof 2008 And a friendof mine lost all of his but 86 cents. got the check in the mail a while back. I just hope FORD survives this in the future for the sake of the auto workers that are left employeed. Still driving my 78 chevy pu. Purrs like a kitten.

Since: Feb 07

Village of Claycomo, MO

#59 Jul 14, 2010
My gold investments haven't lost any, in fact they have grown.

Since: Feb 07

Village of Claycomo, MO

#60 Jul 14, 2010
Time traveler wrote:
Still driving my 78 chevy pu. Purrs like a kitten.
I love the classics, especially the sound of a Chevrolet V-8 327 with 350 heads, dual Holley four barrels and the old "Smitty" type dual exhaust.
They sure don't assemble them like that anymore, do they!
pappy

Mabank, TX

#61 Nov 26, 2010
Yep, thsoe old trucks just keep on purring. Just have to change the oil and the grease in the tranny and rear end. Makes them last a life time if taken care of better than your wife and they love you back. Drove chevies all my life. Just do not like buying imports from Mexico and Canada. And I do not forget when Mexico as a member of OPEC cut our oil off with the other OPEC nations during the Nixon years and our gas shortage. And we are still buddy-buddy with them, why?

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