Henry Ford's Legacy
Savage Factory

Fairfield, OH

#1 Aug 5, 2008
Ford's attitude toward people has filtered through the corporation, and still contaminates it as though Henry's ghost was making every management call. He paid the highest wage for factory workers in history -$5.00 per day. This was as much as many factory workers made in a week. Yet turnover was 60%. Why?

Because of the horrible work conditions. He once fired a man for smiling on the job. Talking was forbidden in the Ford plant, and they developed a method of speaking out of the sides of their mouth, called "Ford Talk." He had a gang of thugs, mostly recruited from ex-cons, who "handled employee problems." Ford was the only American for whom Adolph Hitler expressedd admiration, and Joseph Stahlin once sent his Secret Police for training to Detroit because he was impressed about how Henry Ford ran his empire by using intimidation. Don't take my word for it. Go to the library, or google Henry Ford. You will be shocked.

What does all this have to do with the present? The attitude of Henry Ford is still present in Ford management. The distrust, the intimidation, the empire building. Today's hired thugs call themselves Ford managers and supervisors.
intrepid

Cornwall, Canada

#2 Aug 5, 2008
Toyota fosters an industrial relations model that treats workers like machines, and has pursued a union evasion strategy employing permatemps and wage parity to reduce the incentive to unionize.
But Toyota worker's wages are set to drop, if Toyota has it's way.
In February of this year, an internal memo detailing Toyota plans to slash wages in their North American plants was leaked to the media. Shockingly, the plan appears to call for Toyota to reduce worker pay by more than half.
The company acknowledged that the documents supplied to the Free Press were authentic.
In a memo to workers at the plant after the report was circulated, Toyota noted that workers at Georgetown earned $3 an hour more than the U.S. auto industry standard. The Free Press reported last week the workers averaged $30 an hour, including bonuses.
Currently, the median for comparable manufacturing jobs in Kentucky -- half earn more, half earn less -- is $12.64, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Toyota's strategy resembles what Hyundai Motor Co. uses at its plant in Montgomery, Ala. Assembly workers there make $14 an hour, about half the wages, bonuses and benefits of Toyota, Honda, Nissan and Detroit's automakers. But Hyundai's wages still are considerably higher than for comparable Alabama jobs, which pay $10.79 an hour.
"Our challenge will be how to educate team members and managers about our condition, so that they can understand and accept change," Sudo said in the report.
And it's not just about wage reductions. James Parks over at the AFL-CIO blog reports that Toyota is "dissappearing" workers in order to replace long time workers with permatemps with much lower wages and largely without health benefits.
That's right.
They fired workers because they were injured on the job. That whole "satanic mills" thing seems to be on the rebound with global corporate elites.
...workers say the company, which is nonunion, is firing employees who are injured at work. In addition, full-time workers are being replaced with temporary workers who are paid half what regular team members earn and have little or no health insurance, workers say.
At the town hall meeting, Tim Unger, an 18-year veteran Toyota worker, said he's noticed that some long-time workers have "disappeared" from the plant after they were hurt on the job--victims of Toyota's quest for improved efficiency. Says Unger:
Shoulders would wear out, wrists would require surgery and back
and hands started to fail. It seemed as if the good people who
contributed to the success of Toyota were being used up and
disposed of like garbage.
Earlier this year Toyota overtook GM as the world's largest automaker, yet Toyota workers in Kentucky, Indiana, and California are having their hard work rewarded by being replaced by permatemp workers. Is this really the industrial relations model we want dominating the auto industry?
"What a long strange trip its been"
Dumore

AOL

#3 Aug 5, 2008
intrepid wrote:
Toyota fosters an industrial relations model that treats workers like machines, and has pursued a union evasion strategy employing permatemps and wage parity to reduce the incentive to unionize.
But Toyota worker's wages are set to drop, if Toyota has it's way.
In February of this year, an internal memo detailing Toyota plans to slash wages in their North American plants was leaked to the media.

Shockingly, the plan appears to call for Toyota to reduce worker pay by more than half.
The company acknowledged that the documents supplied to the Free Press were authentic.
In a memo to workers at the plant after the report was circulated, Toyota noted that workers at Georgetown earned $3 an hour more than the U.S. auto industry standard. The Free Press reported last week the workers averaged $30 an hour, including bonuses.
Currently, the median for comparable manufacturing jobs in Kentucky -- half earn more, half earn less -- is $12.64, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Toyota's strategy resembles what Hyundai Motor Co. uses at its plant in Montgomery, Ala. Assembly workers there make $14 an hour, about half the wages, bonuses and benefits of Toyota, Honda, Nissan and Detroit's automakers. But Hyundai's wages still are considerably higher than for comparable Alabama jobs, which pay $10.79 an hour.
"Our challenge will be how to educate team members and managers about our condition, so that they can understand and accept change," Sudo said in the report.
And it's not just about wage reductions. James Parks over at the AFL-CIO blog reports that Toyota is "dissappearing" workers in order to replace long time workers with permatemps with much lower wages and largely without health benefits.
That's right.
They fired workers because they were injured on the job. That whole "satanic mills" thing seems to be on the rebound with global corporate elites.
...workers say the company, which is nonunion, is firing employees who are injured at work. In addition, full-time workers are being replaced with temporary workers who are paid half what regular team members earn and have little or no health insurance, workers say.
At the town hall meeting, Tim Unger, an 18-year veteran Toyota worker, said he's noticed that some long-time workers have "disappeared" from the plant after they were hurt on the job--victims of Toyota's quest for improved efficiency. Says Unger:
Shoulders would wear out, wrists would require surgery and back
and hands started to fail. It seemed as if the good people who
contributed to the success of Toyota were being used up and
disposed of like garbage.
Earlier this year Toyota overtook GM as the world's largest automaker, yet Toyota workers in Kentucky, Indiana, and California are having their hard work rewarded by being replaced by permatemp workers. Is this really the industrial relations model we want dominating the auto industry?
"What a long strange trip its been"
Very odd indeed that the many workers that I know personally at Honda in Marysville and Toyota in Florence have not heard of any of this. Also odd that workers treated so badly would reject, again and again, unionization attempts. Odder still that applications for work at Honda and Toyota are numerous, many of them the relatives of current employees. Strange that you are the only one privy to this deep, dark secret of foreign car makers to screw the American worker.
intrepid

Cornwall, Canada

#4 Aug 6, 2008
Union wages are and always have been a benchmark to aspire to, for other workers in union and non union workplaces alike. Traditional union contracts and their negotiated wage and benefit gains have become demonized and critisized primarily by two groups. Those who make less with no hope of gains, who harbour animosity and jealousy, and those who consider themselves elitest, and have no respect or concept of the work that auto workers perform or the dangers and enviromental hazards we face on a daily basis. They speak of things they no nothing about. Only the bad stories make it to the front page for all to shake their heads in disgust. Good news doesn't sell papers or sensationalize. So many of us forget that Labour Unions and those associated with them fought for the conditions that created the middle class. No we are under siege in a race to the bottom. The hero is seems to be the one who will do it cheapest. How does this serve us all in the end? Who wins? Certainly not the people. Finally a question. After unions are beaten into the ground who will be next to have their wages cut in half or worse? You? Who is safe? Laws are the only things that protect our standard of living. It would seem that laws can be changed at a whim if corporations put enough pressure in the political arena. No one is safe. When they ask you to take a pay cut how will you stop them? What recourse do people have anymore if labour is defeated? Who will speak for you? The voice of the many is stronger than the voice of the few. The corporations know that "divide and conquor" is the way. Without a middle class we are doomed to go back in time.
intrepid

Cornwall, Canada

#5 Aug 6, 2008
Dumore wrote:
<quoted text>
Very odd indeed that the many workers that I know personally at Honda in Marysville and Toyota in Florence have not heard of any of this. Also odd that workers treated so badly would reject, again and again, unionization attempts. Odder still that applications for work at Honda and Toyota are numerous, many of them the relatives of current employees. Strange that you are the only one privy to this deep, dark secret of foreign car makers to screw the American worker.
Most Japanese transplant workers in North America are most likely under the false impression that they are compensated accordingly for their hard work team effort and their dedication. While all these attributes are admirable I dare say they will be in shock in the short years ahead as they're wages are scaled back considerably. I have no doubt that they are good workers who give there all for the success of the company but look at the wage disparity between what workers make in the south and what they make in the north working for the same companies doing similiar work. The higher wages in the north are because of the geographical proximity to unionized workplaces and organized labour itself. They pay the workers there more to KEEP THE UNIONS OUT. It has nothing to do with the ability of these companies to pay. Workers wages account for only 10% of the overall cost of building a vehicle. The larger costs are incurred by materials. Many of the southern states have horrible "Right To Work" laws (more like "Right to get screwed over") Unions for good or bad have always been a counter balance to corporate greed and exploitation. There was a time when most people supported their efforts. I'm not saying unions haven't made mistakes but you can pin that medal on most institutions beginning with our own government. So without any representation for workers what do we all do? Hope that corporations treat us fairly and justly? Isn't that a bit naive? The Japanese transplant workers are benefiting from the presence of unions without actually being memebers of one. They just don't realize it. Only time will tell. Maybe we have to all hit rock bottom before we realize who the enemy really is.
Dumore

AOL

#6 Aug 7, 2008
Corporations will never treat us fair. They will always squeeze out as much as they can and pay us as little as they can get by with. Unions, for 40 years or so, protected the working man and looked after his best interests. They were, indeed, a counter balance to corrupt corporate power. They created the middle class. I know the sacrifices they made and the battles they fought. I am from the Pennsylvania coal fields. Sadly, they became as corrupt as the corporations, with a bloated hierarchy of overpaid guys in suits working out of fancy offices and driving fancy cars and playing politics. John L. Lewis, Walter Reuther, and others never meant for unions to exploit companyies and society by ransom: pay us more for less or we will shut you down. The most dispicable men I have ever met were drunks who became UAW committeemen so they would not have to run machines. The union killed the goose that laid the golden egg. What will happen? Corporations will keep squeezing people, driving down wages, destroying what is left of the middle class, until the working man will take no more. Then there will be a revolution, or a massive resurgence of unionization, and the whole labor cycle will start over again. We will not see it, but our grandchildren will. Blame it on the unions. A man is worth only what he produces, not what he can extract by brute force. The working man built America with his sweat.Sadly, he destroyed America with his laziness and greed.
CWS FORD BUILT GARBAGE

United States

#7 Aug 8, 2008
UAW stands for "U AIN'T WORKING!!!!!!!!"

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