Heat blankets U.S. as workers return after holiday

With a scorching holiday weekend in the rearview mirror, a real summer sizzle is about to wash over parts of the United States. Full Story
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Ghostcrawler

Bratislava, Slovakia

#21 Jul 7, 2010
estanson wrote:
<quoted text>
never took statistics so its new to me...and i might well be butchering the techical jargon...
point well taken...
can a trend not be up or down but cyclical?
Then it would be a cyclical element, or a cyclical component :) Trend is specifically up or down.

I seriously think we should start a scare over "Global Cycling".
Mike MUlligan

Roslindale, MA

#22 Jul 7, 2010
The More You Know PhD wrote:
<quoted text>
I look forward to your retraction and apology when these "underground cables" don't "burn up."
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/08/nyregion/08...

Record Heat Stretches to Fourth Day

...”But even as Con Edison officials were optimistic that the city would survive the day without widespread power failures, they acknowledged that the intensity and duration of the heat wave could have a cumulative effect on the cables and transformers. In short, they said, the worst may be yet to come.

It has been four years since the utility’s equipment in Long Island City failed in a cascade of blown feeder lines and left tens of thousands of Queens residents without power for more than a week. The power system’s ability to withstand a sustained surge in demand has not really been tested since that summer.

“We haven’t had a real New York heat wave in a while,” said Mr. Miksad, who admitted to having fretted through a “nervous weekend” knowing what was coming. Con Edison dispatched extra crews to Staten Island where a main feeder cable failed early in the day, and by late afternoon on Tuesday more than 4,000 customers were without power in the Fox Hills neighborhood.

The power failures came as city officials and utility executives dealt on Tuesday with what was the hottest day in New York since Aug. 9, 2001, when the temperature in Central Park also reached 103 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.’...
The More You Know PsyD

Concord, NH

#23 Jul 7, 2010
Mike MUlligan wrote:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/08/nyregion/08...
Record Heat Stretches to Fourth Day
See post #10 where I said:

"If you are trying to imply that you can put too much load through a cable or transformer and damage it, you are correct. High temps or low temps or unit outages or congestion can all lead to this."
Mike MUlligan

Roslindale, MA

#24 Jul 7, 2010
Naw, the high load slowly heat up the tunnel that causes the insulation damage...it take high load, heat, mostly a third world grid, aging equipment dating back 50 years or more, penny pitching utilities and poor maintenance. That is way there is less if it in the winter...the tunnel is naturally cooler.
Mike Mulligan

Roslindale, MA

#25 Jul 7, 2010
One cable goes out, this forces the other cables to pick up the load...it drives them all into being hotter. Then it escalates into a cascade where most of the cables fail.
The More You Know PsyD

Concord, NH

#26 Jul 7, 2010
Mike Mulligan wrote:
One cable goes out, this forces the other cables to pick up the load...it drives them all into being hotter. Then it escalates into a cascade where most of the cables fail.
Mike, you can have failures any time. Most peak loads occur in the summer, so that is when you have the failures.

Most of the third world doesn't have a grid.
Sure is HOT

Moretown, VT

#27 Jul 8, 2010
Ghostcrawler wrote:
Al Gore is right in the summer and wrong in the winter.
Cold Winter - Hot Summer, sounds like the only climate control going on in these parts is furnace and fan driven.
Mike Mulligan

Roslindale, MA

#28 Jul 8, 2010
The tilities are not keeping up with growth and aging, it is the republican money pinching mode and the politicians are bought off....95% of the failures are caused by this and preventable.

We got a crisis nationwide with a philosophy that can’t financially carry our infrastructures across the board...most of them are obsolete and failure prone.

And the democrats got no balls!
Sure is HOT

Moretown, VT

#29 Jul 8, 2010
And the democrats got no balls!

Watch your sp Mulligan, the word is "brains"
Heat wave 2010

Westfield, NY

#30 Jul 13, 2010
I am going to keep posting this information because I cannot believe that this is permitted in Vermont or anywhere else.At the very least, with the ingenuity and resourcefulness available in the State of Vermont, would someone devise a roof wind turbine system sufficient to provide power to charge batteries, store power and cool these plants before someone dies?
"The Vermont Department of Health suggests going to places with air conditioning, such as libraries, theaters, shopping malls and other community facilities that may offer refuge during the warmest times of the day, between noon and 6 p.m.Heat cramps and heat exhaustion typically occur when people overexert themselves in a warm, humid place, said Mark Bosma, public information officer for Vermont Emergency Management. Symptoms may include headache, muscle pains, cramps and or nausea, Bosma said.
The person may also be experiencing dizziness so it's important to treat the person promptly so the condition doesn't intensify into heat stroke, a life-threatening condition."
During the present heat wave the current policy in the State of Vermont allows the owners of manufacturing facilities to operate without controlling the temperature inside the facility. I was shocked to hear these reports: one works at FulFlex, a plastics manufacturing plant for a full 8 hour shift in 93 degree temperature.Another works in a boiler room with temperatures up to 103 degrees. While I was in the bank, a customer complained of working at FiberMark, a paper mill, in temperatures up to 93 degrees. In all the three situations, none of the employers provided cold drinks or rest periods.
I have been informed that Vermont is a state-plan state and creates its own safety guidelines while not adhering to the national OSHA standards.A Letter of Interpretation in 2003 changed the standards for regulating temperatures in the manufacturing workplace allowing owners to eliminate air conditioning, as a cost issue.To relieve the heat build up in the plants, it was recommended that windows be opened to provide ventilation when possible. Owners are required to provide cold drinks and rest periods to employees. When a worker collapses from heat stress and has to be hospitalized, a Worker’s Compensation Claim is filed and the workers can report the incident and make a complaint.
Workers’ lives are placed in jeopardy of death from heat stroke while the employer benefits from lowered operating costs. From a purely logistical viewpoint, the worker is not performing to his/her fullest potential while fatigued, and workplace safety is compromised.A lethargic worker is not alert and will cause an accident. The production levels diminish, as one is not able to perform at peak levels.How can this lower level of productivity possibly serve the best interests of the employer, or the State of Vermont that is seeking to attract new business? Surely the cost of operating coolant equipment offsets the potential of an employee succumbing to heat stroke, resulting in impairment or even death.To subject workers to such environments reveals a base disregard for the sacrifices made to obtain workplace reform over the past 120 years and shows no respect for valuable skilled labor.
How is it possible in forward thinking Vermont that the Legislature voted twice since 2003 to defeat legislation that would have reversed this policy?Office environments are regulated and must be maintained to 68 – 74 degrees.Where is the equal treatment for factory workers?Older workers working toward retirement have to worry about possible heat stroke, brain damage or death when they report for their shift.
How is it possible that the Vermont Department of Health does not have authority to stop this practice?This practice falls under the jurisdiction of the Department of Labor and Industry.Remember the factory workers during the heat wave this week as they are enduring an unspeakable hardship to benefit the plant owner’s bottom line.
Heat wave 2010

Westfield, NY

#31 Jul 13, 2010
I will continue to post this information until the practice stops. "The Vermont Department of Health suggests going to places with air conditioning, such as libraries, theaters, shopping malls and other community facilities that may offer refuge during the warmest times of the day, between noon and 6 p.m.

Heat cramps and heat exhaustion typically occur when people overexert themselves in a warm, humid place, said Mark Bosma, public information officer for Vermont Emergency Management. Symptoms may include headache, muscle pains, cramps and or nausea, Bosma said.

The person may also be experiencing dizziness so it's important to treat the person promptly so the condition doesn't intensify into heat stroke, a life-threatening condition."

During the present heat wave the current policy in the State of Vermont allows the owners of manufacturing facilities to operate without controlling the temperature inside the facility. I was shocked to hear these reports: one works at FulFlex, a plastics manufacturing plant for a full 8 hour shift in 93 degree temperature. Another works in a boiler room with temperatures up to 103 degrees. While I was in the bank, a customer complained of working at FiberMark, a paper mill, in temperatures up to 93 degrees. In all the three situations, none of the employers provided cold drinks or rest periods.

I have been informed that Vermont is a state-plan state and creates its own safety guidelines while not adhering to the national OSHA standards. A Letter of Interpretation in 2003 changed the standards for regulating temperatures in the manufacturing workplace allowing owners to eliminate air conditioning, as a cost issue. To relieve the heat build up in the plants, it was recommended that windows be opened to provide ventilation when possible. Owners are required to provide cold drinks and rest periods to employees. When a worker collapses from heat stress and has to be hospitalized, a Worker’s Compensation Claim is filed and the workers can report the incident and make a complaint.

Workers’ lives are placed in jeopardy of death from heat stroke while the employer benefits from lowered operating costs. From a purely logistical viewpoint, the worker is not performing to his/her fullest potential while fatigued, and workplace safety is compromised. A lethargic worker is not alert and will cause an accident. The production levels diminish, as one is not able to perform at peak levels. How can this lower level of productivity possibly serve the best interests of the employer, or the State of Vermont that is seeking to attract new business? Surely the cost of operating coolant equipment offsets the potential of an employee succumbing to heat stroke, resulting in impairment or even death. To subject workers to such environments reveals a base disregard for the sacrifices made to obtain workplace reform over the past 120 years and shows no respect for valuable skilled labor.

I am deeply disturbed that my native Vermont endorses such a culture. How is it possible in forward thinking Vermont that the Legislature voted twice since 2003 to defeat legislation that would have reversed this policy? Office environments are regulated and must be maintained to 68 – 74 degrees. Where is the equal treatment for factory workers? Older workers working toward retirement have to worry about possible heat stroke, brain damage or death when they report for their shift.

How is it possible that the Vermont Department of Health does not have authority to stop this practice? This practice falls under the jurisdiction of the Department of Labor and Industry.

Remember the factory workers during the heat wave this week as they are enduring an unspeakable hardship to benefit the plant owner’s bottom line.
Reality

Brattleboro, VT

#32 Jul 13, 2010
Heat wave 2010 wrote:
I will continue to post this information until the practice stops.
I am appalled by the info. However, do you really think posting this info all over the place on the internet will stop the practice?

Put the energy into communicating with local selectboards, law enforcement, regulatory agencies and etc.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

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