US farm tyres tycoon attacks 'screwed...

US farm tyres tycoon attacks 'screwed up' France

There are 17 comments on the Agrimoney.com story from Dec 2, 2011, titled US farm tyres tycoon attacks 'screwed up' France. In it, Agrimoney.com reports that:

Outspoken US agribusiness boss Maurice Taylor attacked France's business practices as "screwed up", and questioned the country's work ethic, after his quest to buy a tractor tyre business was tripped up by employment red tape.

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Since: Dec 07

Location hidden

#1 Dec 2, 2011
Obviously Maurice Taylor is used to railroading companies. His problem has nothing to do with the Unions it is French Law! If he takes over a plant, he has to post guarantees to protect the pension rights of the workers. Unlike in America and many other countries the Pension fund and other Social assets are ring fenced and never become part of the company's assets to strip and sell.

Welcome to the Free world Maurice Taylor.
Froghopper

Saint-sébastien-sur-loire, France

#2 Dec 3, 2011
This man follows a very long list of businessmen who tried and failed to invest in France. The country is so backward in business it is a wonder it does not fall over. The unions are more interested in keeping themselves in business rather than saving jobs but of course the French have not realised that one yet. The more fuss the unions make over every little thing then the more they create a need for themselves. In the meantime businesses stay away from France and the French continue on the downward spiral of decline. This is why so many people turn to the internet because they can do business outside France for a fraction of the cost and unlike France the internet is always open for business. Vive La Internet !

Since: Dec 07

Location hidden

#3 Dec 3, 2011
He has tried and failed because has not done his homework. If I wanted to invest in Russia, which incidentally many French have, you have to adjust to the conditions in that country, the yanks never have and never will. Maybe thats why they are in recession and have the highest percentage of unemployment in the G8
Froghopper

Saint-sébastien-sur-loire, France

#4 Dec 3, 2011
French businessmen have indeed invested heavily in other countries including Russia and the US. The main reason most have them have cited is the ease of doing so unlike France where business is stifled and choked by bureaucrats and unions. That is why French businessmen go elsewhere and why France continues to sink. In Russia and the US they work a full week from early morning to early evening and days off are not paid for and lunch is just half an hour. The main problem as always is that the French would rather refuse to accept the truth than face criticism. Pride comes before a fall.
ronan

UK

#5 Dec 3, 2011
France is an anti-business environment and the French are really anti-entrepreneurial at heart. Rather than seeing the advantage of free enterprise, they will put obstacle in the past of anyone who is inventive. The average French is just a jealous person, suspicious of entrepreneurs, and envious if they succeed.

Most of French work in the public sector, in administartions or state-owned industries. They are against free enterprise, globalisation. They want their jobs protected, impervious to economic circumstances.

I blame decades of state interference in the economic life, and the burden created by over-inflated social protection created by more a century of trade union militantism. The French are mostly good at going on strike.

The French don't like to take risk, and don't understand those who do. Therefore, they are more interested in protecting their social advantages than in creating employment.

The French don't like to work too much, don't like to work at lunch, don't like long hours, don't like work at weekend, don't like work at night, don't like to work too far, don't like this, don't like that... Work has to fit in their family life, and never the other way round.

Once they are recruited, they expect a job for life, regardless of their performance, of the economic climate, of their sickness, absence, etc... Sacking an employee in France is costly and near impossible, etc...

No wonder foreign investors think twice about putting their money in this archaic economic system.
Alexcandre

Athens, Greece

#6 Dec 13, 2011
ronan wrote:
France is an anti-business environment and the French are really anti-entrepreneurial at heart. Rather than seeing the advantage of free enterprise, they will put obstacle in the past of anyone who is inventive. The average French is just a jealous person, suspicious of entrepreneurs, and envious if they succeed.
Most of French work in the public sector, in administartions or state-owned industries. They are against free enterprise, globalisation. They want their jobs protected, impervious to economic circumstances.
I blame decades of state interference in the economic life, and the burden created by over-inflated social protection created by more a century of trade union militantism. The French are mostly good at going on strike.
The French don't like to take risk, and don't understand those who do. Therefore, they are more interested in protecting their social advantages than in creating employment.
The French don't like to work too much, don't like to work at lunch, don't like long hours, don't like work at weekend, don't like work at night, don't like to work too far, don't like this, don't like that... Work has to fit in their family life, and never the other way round.
Once they are recruited, they expect a job for life, regardless of their performance, of the economic climate, of their sickness, absence, etc... Sacking an employee in France is costly and near impossible, etc...
No wonder foreign investors think twice about putting their money in this archaic economic system.
Despite this, France's GDP is higher than the UKs and has been higher for most of the last 20 years.. France has more industry than the UK. Also French people are more efficient than Brits. I am not saying it, the statistics do!!!!! And everything I say here is backed by figures, dont make me go look for them.

UK is "une economie de papier". People work long hours but dont produce anything. UK's economie is all trade, services and finance. Unfortunately this is all crumbling down now. The introduction of the Tobin tax will be the nail in the coffin for the UK.

UK has terrible plumbing and terrible engineerring. Everything breaks down there. I can still remember the leaks in the house in London! And this odious car called Jaguar. What piece of cr ap!!!!! I still get upset thinking about this car!!! The tube is always broken. Maybe you guys dont strike, but your trains are always out of service. Talk about being backwards!!!

They call London "cosmopolitan", I call it a huge toilet full of muslim tuurd

~Alexandre~
ronan

UK

#8 Dec 13, 2011
Alexcandre wrote:
<quoted text>
UK's economie is all trade, services and finance. Unfortunately this is all crumbling down now. The introduction of the Tobin tax will be the nail in the coffin for the UK.
~
There will be no Tobin tax, sunshine, we vetoed it!
Enjoy rescuing all the defaulting countries in the Eurozone, ha, ha, ha ...
ronan

UK

#9 Dec 13, 2011
Alexcandre wrote:
<quoted text>
! And this odious car called Jaguar. What piece of cr ap!!!!! I still get upset thinking about this car!!!~
I had Jags on and off for the last 30 years and never had any problem. I still have a 5 years old S-type and I will have a brand new XF in February as company car. Jaguars are good cars and there is a good distribution network. The proof is that they sell well worldwide, and the company recently had to recruit 1000 staff to increase production; remarkable in the middle of a recession.
France is uncapable to produce a car like the Jaguar; it always was. France hasn't premium or luxury cars. For years, France also cannot produce any sports cars, or racing cars. Compared to that, Britain is a leader in that field.We have Jaguar, Land Rover, Aston Martin, McLaren, Rolls-Royce, Bentley, Jensen, Ginetta, Morgan, Noble, etc...
All France has is Renault, Citroen and Peugeot, small fragile boring little cars ... mass produced by lazy workers always on strike! They cannot export in most markets, and are laughed at in the rest of the world.
Alexandre

Athens, Greece

#10 Dec 13, 2011
ronan wrote:
<quoted text>
I had Jags on and off for the last 30 years and never had any problem. I still have a 5 years old S-type and I will have a brand new XF in February as company car. Jaguars are good cars and there is a good distribution network. The proof is that they sell well worldwide, and the company recently had to recruit 1000 staff to increase production; remarkable in the middle of a recession.
France is uncapable to produce a car like the Jaguar; it always was. France hasn't premium or luxury cars. For years, France also cannot produce any sports cars, or racing cars. Compared to that, Britain is a leader in that field.We have Jaguar, Land Rover, Aston Martin, McLaren, Rolls-Royce, Bentley, Jensen, Ginetta, Morgan, Noble, etc...
All France has is Renault, Citroen and Peugeot, small fragile boring little cars ... mass produced by lazy workers always on strike! They cannot export in most markets, and are laughed at in the rest of the world.
Jag is now Ford so you drive a Ford, with most components made in Germany (ford Europe), in fact you're driving a German car. The other brands you mentionned are small brands, for the rich artistocrats and the monarchy in England, and some idiot arabs you can sell them to in arabia. I think Aston Martins are ugly anyway, I'd rather drive a Ferrari or a Lambo or even a Porsche.
Citroen cars have a long beautiful history but you wouldn't be smart enough to understand that.

But I still remember that hell of a car called Jaguar XJ6, what an absolute piece of garbage!!!!!!! They should have let it go bankrupt, I wouldnt get this ill feeling everytime I see this horrible car
Froghopper

Châteaubriant, France

#11 Dec 13, 2011
Anyone in the world reading this needs to take note. French cars are unreliable and made of cheap materials. Anyone who has ever had the misfortune to own a French car (or anything made in France ) will know how bad the manufacturing is. There are no proper guarantees with French products and if anything needs to be returned because of malfunction the reaction is what is known as the ‘Gallic Shrug’. This is the French habit of simultaneously raising the eyebrows and the shoulders and it translates as ‘Not my fault, can’t help you, go somewhere else, I don’t care.’

If a new German, American, British, Italian or Swedish car has an after sales fault it will be met with apologies and instant and efficient repairs. In France you will first get the 'Gallic Shrug' followed by referrals to umpteen other places with more shrugs and if you are very persistent and very lucky you might get eventually some service after months or even years of trying - at a price of course. Thinking French ?……Think again.
ronan

UK

#12 Dec 13, 2011
Alexandre wrote:
<quoted text>
Jag is now Ford so you drive a Ford, with most components made in Germany (ford Europe), in fact you're driving a German car. The other brands you mentionned are small brands, for the rich artistocrats and the monarchy in England, and some idiot arabs you can sell them to in arabia. I think Aston Martins are ugly anyway, I'd rather drive a Ferrari or a Lambo or even a Porsche.
Citroen cars have a long beautiful history but you wouldn't be smart enough to understand that.
But I still remember that hell of a car called Jaguar XJ6, what an absolute piece of garbage!!!!!!! They should have let it go bankrupt, I wouldnt get this ill feeling everytime I see this horrible car
Like for the rest, you know very little about cars!

Jaguar doesn't belong to Ford anymore, and is independent.
Yeah, of course we only manufacture cars for the aristocracy; how big do you think if the Royal Family? Millions? LOL

Do you sell many Citroen is the rich Middle east? LOL

France only produces small borinmg cars. All your 4 X 4 are imported!
Europe our ground

Shanghai, China

#13 Dec 16, 2011
I know this thigs are fuc3ing expensive. A tractor tire cost like 1200 euros one. Long live to Michelin.
Alexandre

Athens, Greece

#15 Dec 19, 2011
ronan wrote:
<quoted text>
Like for the rest, you know very little about cars!
Jaguar doesn't belong to Ford anymore, and is independent.
Yeah, of course we only manufacture cars for the aristocracy; how big do you think if the Royal Family? Millions? LOL
Do you sell many Citroen is the rich Middle east? LOL
France only produces small borinmg cars. All your 4 X 4 are imported!
French cars are the opposite of boring, you got it all wrong you see.

Have you heard about Citroen DS, Renault Espace, Renault Scenic, Renault Alpine, etc

Citroen invented la suspension hydropneumatique. Renault invented le monospace.

Besides, Renault is the most profitable car company in the world. Check it if you dont believe me. Its one of the few car companies which has seen sales rising during the crisis.

France mass produces cars. England has smaller car companies that produce less than 1000 cars a year. And please dont tell me Ford is a British car company. I find your luxury cars very ugly and comical: the Bentleys, the Rolls Royces, the Aston Martins have weird designs that come straight out of a cartoon. Idoit Arabs in the Middle East and Hollywood clowns would buy them. People with class buy Italian or German luxury cars. Technology wise you cannot compare a Rolls to a Mercedes anyway.

Jaguars have the worst engineering ever . I can still remember going uphill and the car not having enough power!!! I cannot count the number of breakdowns. But as I said most of these car companies arent truly British. Jaguar is now Indian. Ford got rid of this garbage car company and sold it to the Indians.

England is turning Indian so maybe thaht makes Jaguar British, is that what you mean??

~A~
ronan

UK

#16 Dec 19, 2011
Alexandre wrote:
<quoted text>
Besides, Renault is the most profitable car company in the world. Check it if you dont believe me. Its one of the few car companies which has seen sales rising during the crisis.
Renault UK slashes model range

http://www.autocar.co.uk/News/NewsArticle/All...

Renault UK will swing the axe and kill off four significant models from its range, including the once strong-selling Laguna, next February. The drastic action will account for the complete Laguna range, including the coupe, plus the Wind roadster, both variants of the Modus and Espace and the Kangoo and Trafic passenger versions.
“We have a corporate target to be profitable in all the countries that Renault sells cars and that demands tough action in the UK,” says the company.
The UK operation is understood to have been loss-making for a number of recent years, possibly back to 2006.
ronan

UK

#17 Dec 19, 2011
Alexandre wrote:
<quoted text>
Jaguars have the worst engineering ever .~
Sales boost for Jaguar Land Rover

http://www.autocar.co.uk/News/NewsArticle/All...

Jaguar Land Rover has reported a sales growth of almost 14 per cent over the first half of 2011 compared to the corresponding period last year.
JLR sales for January-June stood at 130,090 units, representing an increase of 13.8 per cent over January-June 2010. This was attributed to a better product and market mix allied with strong growth in China and Russia.
The new 2.2-litre diesel engine introduced in the Jaguar XF saloon was a major boost for the firm, as was the high demand for the much-vaunted Range Rover Evoque, which had racked up 7700 sales up until September of this year.
JLR’s profits before tax for the third quarter of the 2011-12 financial year were up almost nine per cent to £287million, while revenues were up 30 per cent to £2.9billion compared to the third quarter of 2010.
The financial results follow the news that JLR has created more than 1000 new jobs at its manufacturing plant in Solihull.
The 25 per cent boost in workforce is thanks to a multi billion pound investment in new models, which will deliver “40 significant product actions over the next five years”, according to JLR.
ronan

UK

#18 Dec 19, 2011
Alexandre wrote:
<quoted text>
Renault invented le monospace.
You keep repeating that lie! You don't know much about cars, do you?

The Renault Espace was in fact a project Matra tried to sold to Peugeot at the time.

Matra had colloborated with Simca and thought that Peugeot, that took over, would be interested in a monospace.

It's Jean Luc Lagardere visiting the USA years ago, who had the idea of copying the Chrysler Minivan. He ordered his engineers to design one made of plastic.

When Peugeot declined, Lagardere approached Renault that agreed to finance its production and took it in its range.
Until recently, the Renault Espace was built at Romorantin in Matra factory.
ronan

UK

#19 Dec 19, 2011
Alexandre wrote:
<quoted text>
~
Source Wikipedia

The Espace's design was originally conceived in the 1970s by the British designer, Fergus Pollock,(at around the same time as Giorgetto Giugiaro's 1978 Lancia Megagamma concept MPV), who was working for Chrysler UK (formerly the Rootes Group), at their design centre at Whitley,(now the Jaguar design centre) in Coventry.[2] Later Matra, who were affiliated with Simca, the then French subsidiary of Chrysler, were involved in partnership in the design, spearheaded by Greek designer Antonis Volanis.
The Espace was originally intended to be sold as a Talbot, and to be a replacement for the Matra Rancho leisure activity vehicle. Early prototypes used Simca parts, and hence featured a grille reminiscent of the Simca 1307 (Chrysler Alpine).
In 1978, six years before the Espace went into production, Chrysler UK and Simca were sold to the French company PSA Peugeot Citroën (PSA), and the Espace design was given to Matra.
PSA decided the Espace was too expensive and too risky a design to put into production, and Matra took their idea to Renault (PSA finally ventured into the minivan sector eleven years later with the Citroën Evasion/Peugeot 806).
In 1982, Pierre Heymann who was working on the comparative testing for automobiles at the French National Consumer Institute, made his design for an ideal car and proposed it to Renault.
The Matra concept became the Renault Espace. The design featured a fiberglass body mounted on a warm-galvanized steel chassis, using the same technique and assembly line at the factory as the Talbot Matra Murena. In fact, the introduction of the Espace required the relatively small factory to cease the production of the Murena, to make room for the Espace.
The Espace was launched by Renault in 1984. After a very slow start — a grand total of nine Espaces were sold in the first month after launch[3]— customers warmed to the benefits of the MPV concept and the Espace became very popular.

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