Freight train traffic to shift in Mar...

Freight train traffic to shift in March in wake of rail merger

There are 346 comments on the Chicago Tribune story from Feb 1, 2009, titled Freight train traffic to shift in March in wake of rail merger. In it, Chicago Tribune reports that:

More freight trains will be rolling through suburbs lining the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railway starting March 4 now that the line has been acquired by the Canadian National Railway, the Montreal-based railroad ...

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Agnes Blumgarten

Westchester, IL

#1 Feb 2, 2009
This is great news for all of northern Illinois.
Alaz

Lincolnshire, IL

#2 Feb 2, 2009
I ride the North Central line and freight trains have ruined several commutes. It would be great to get rid of the trains on this line. I think freight trains should have their own line and they should be above or below roads so they don't interfere with traffic.
Betty McBitter

Chicago, IL

#3 Feb 2, 2009
Alleluia. It's about time the region benefits. Any news on how this might affect the traffic on the city rail yard lines?
Out of Towner

Bensenville, IL

#4 Feb 2, 2009
This is going to really clog things up in the Barrington area. There are no grade-separrated rail crossings in town, so it would be a good idea to avoid Rt. 59 and Lake-Cook Road. And don't count on an ambulance getting you to Good Shepherd in a timely manner, either.
Slack

Rolling Meadows, IL

#5 Feb 2, 2009
Agnes Blumgarten wrote:
This is great news for all of northern Illinois.
Not really.. the overall volume of traffic won't change - it will just shift. Some towns are going to take it in the shorts...
Not a Railroader

Omaha, NE

#6 Feb 2, 2009
Out of Towner wrote:
This is going to really clog things up in the Barrington area. There are no grade-separrated rail crossings in town, so it would be a good idea to avoid Rt. 59 and Lake-Cook Road. And don't count on an ambulance getting you to Good Shepherd in a timely manner, either.
I agree that people should avoid Rt. 59 and Lake-Cook Road through Barrington, if possible. However, even without the trains it is a good idea to avoid Rt. 59 and Lake-Cook Road. Both of those streets are already overcapacity (a rating of F, which means they have more vehicles than the street can or should handle). And that is without any railroad crossing considered. On the other hand the STB's EIS points out that even when CN implements its full use of the EJ&E in 3 years, those crossings will still be rated A (as they are today) which means that those crossings have little to no impact on the flow of traffic over them.
In other words, the sky is not falling on Barrington.
Hans Reisner

Joliet, IL

#7 Feb 2, 2009
Slack wrote:
<quoted text>
Not really.. the overall volume of traffic won't change - it will just shift. Some towns are going to take it in the shorts...
Yes really.

The same traffic will clear the Chicago area in a much reduced time (hours on a through train as opposed to days through various classification yards and trackage right changes).

This is a huge win and will help keep Chicago a viable commerce hub for the nation as a whole.
Karl Spackler

Downers Grove, IL

#8 Feb 2, 2009
I don’t know about Barrington but wait until you see downtown West Chicago. The intersecting lines and Fabyan/Washington traffic is going to be more of a nightmare than it already is. I would also like to see proof that his is going to be a benefit to northern Illinois. Trains passing through the area benefits us in what way?
Tom

Atlanta, GA

#9 Feb 2, 2009
Alaz wrote:
I ride the North Central line and freight trains have ruined several commutes. It would be great to get rid of the trains on this line. I think freight trains should have their own line and they should be above or below roads so they don't interfere with traffic.
Commuter rails should be the ones creating thier own rails. The rail are owned by the freight train companies which rent the rails to Amtrack. So if the Fraight companies wanted to be jerks they could say you are no longer running Commuter trains on our rails. Then you wouldn't have a rail commute option.
Tom

Atlanta, GA

#10 Feb 2, 2009
Out of Towner wrote:
This is going to really clog things up in the Barrington area. There are no grade-separrated rail crossings in town, so it would be a good idea to avoid Rt. 59 and Lake-Cook Road. And don't count on an ambulance getting you to Good Shepherd in a timely manner, either.
That's what happens when you live so far from the city. You have to deal with rural issues like long trains. It does not sound like a train issue. The train tracks were there way before the hospital was. It sounds like poor city planning to me. Maybe vote some smarter people into you city government.
Oldie

Barrington, IL

#11 Feb 2, 2009
Not a Railroader wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree that people should avoid Rt. 59 and Lake-Cook Road through Barrington, if possible. However, even without the trains it is a good idea to avoid Rt. 59 and Lake-Cook Road. Both of those streets are already overcapacity (a rating of F, which means they have more vehicles than the street can or should handle). And that is without any railroad crossing considered. On the other hand the STB's EIS points out that even when CN implements its full use of the EJ&E in 3 years, those crossings will still be rated A (as they are today) which means that those crossings have little to no impact on the flow of traffic over them.
In other words, the sky is not falling on Barrington.
Unless you live there. A four-fold increase in the number of times all the main thorofares are blocked at the same time will definitely have an impact on residents.
Dontrel _V-Lane_ Vazor

Dawson Springs, KY

#12 Feb 2, 2009
Those tracks were there long before you or your family located there and long before your hospital was put in. I heard there is some undeveloped land in Idaho which has your name on it.
Tom

Atlanta, GA

#13 Feb 2, 2009
Out of Towner wrote:
This is going to really clog things up in the Barrington area. There are no grade-separrated rail crossings in town, so it would be a good idea to avoid Rt. 59 and Lake-Cook Road. And don't count on an ambulance getting you to Good Shepherd in a timely manner, either.
That area was bad even for over 15 years. When I worked in that area 15 years ago the road could not handle the traffic volume. Plus you moved to a town with a railroad line in it and you are suprised that there is rail traffic? Maybe you need to check out the place you are buying in better before you buy. There are pros and cons of living everywhere. One of the cons of living in a town with a train line running through it is that there will be train traffic. It does not take a high school grad to figure that one out. You made a mistake that you did not checkout the area before you move there.
record tech

Hinsdale, IL

#14 Feb 2, 2009
Isn't there a law here that says trains can't block highways for more than 10 minutes? Or did G-Rod and his beloved cadre repeal it? It sure seems around here that we're waiting for much longer trains than we used to.
Joe A - Chicago

Chicago, IL

#15 Feb 2, 2009
Hans Reisner wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes really.
The same traffic will clear the Chicago area in a much reduced time (hours on a through train as opposed to days through various classification yards and trackage right changes).
This is a huge win and will help keep Chicago a viable commerce hub for the nation as a whole.
Amen. Kudos to the STB for looking at the BIG picture! This and other plans to unsnarl freight in Chicago will have huge benefits for the region AND the nation. Many suburbanites want the benefits of living next to a thriving metropolis without the slightest inconveniences.
Suck it up, people, and do your part to help the region. You live where you do BECAUSE OF the RR's!

JRR

Since: Jan 08

Central IL

#16 Feb 2, 2009
Oldie wrote:
<quoted text>
Unless you live there. A four-fold increase in the number of times all the main thorofares are blocked at the same time will definitely have an impact on residents.
No one said that this transaction has no impact, but that's why there were conditions put on the transaction and that's why CN and several communities worked together to make agreements.
Karl Spackler wrote:
Trains passing through the area benefits us in what way?
This should be a no-brainer. The trains already pass through the area but because of congestion, take as long to travel through Chicago as they do to reach either of the coasts once they leave the area. By using the EJ&E line to bypass the congestion, they can trim the travel time and eliminate the delays. Delays cost money in terms of crews sitting idle (think about how productive YOU are while sitting stuck in traffic), not to mention the cost of all that costly equipment (freight cars) sitting still and not able to be unloaded and then reloaded with other commodities until the logjam breaks loose.

JRR

Since: Jan 08

Central IL

#17 Feb 2, 2009
record tech wrote:
Isn't there a law here that says trains can't block highways for more than 10 minutes? Or did G-Rod and his beloved cadre repeal it? It sure seems around here that we're waiting for much longer trains than we used to.
The law as it stood in Illinois was ruled unconstitutional last year on the grounds that it impeded interstate commerce.

Longer trains have been the trend over the past 30 years because of the economies of scale involved with moving more freight with fewer crewmen.
not rural anymore

Plano, TX

#18 Feb 2, 2009
Tom wrote:
<quoted text>
That's what happens when you live so far from the city. You have to deal with rural issues like long trains. It does not sound like a train issue. The train tracks were there way before the hospital was. It sounds like poor city planning to me. Maybe vote some smarter people into you city government.
The communities that the rail traffic will now pass thorugh may be farther from the city, but they are no longer "rural". That's the problem - if the current rail traffic is a problem on it current route, it will be a problem on the the new. Maybe all you suburb bashers need to take a ride and get to know the areas that you are speaking about.
Karl Spackler

Woodridge, IL

#19 Feb 2, 2009
Talking from a macroeconomic standpoint you may be right. Locally though you have just transferred traffic (auto) delays from one area to another. The new areas are ill equipped to deal with the increase in locomotive traffic. So if you are talking about the health of CN and perhaps the American economy in general you may be right concerning productivity. A local business or municipality may beg to differ. And the “no brianer” statement is not productive and shows nothing but hubris.
JRR wrote:
<quoted text>No one said that this transaction has no impact, but that's why there were conditions put on the transaction and that's why CN and several communities worked together to make agreements.
<quoted text>This should be a no-brainer. The trains already pass through the area but because of congestion, take as long to travel through Chicago as they do to reach either of the coasts once they leave the area. By using the EJ&E line to bypass the congestion, they can trim the travel time and eliminate the delays. Delays cost money in terms of crews sitting idle (think about how productive YOU are while sitting stuck in traffic), not to mention the cost of all that costly equipment (freight cars) sitting still and not able to be unloaded and then reloaded with other commodities until the logjam breaks loose.
NIMBY

Lincolnshire, IL

#20 Feb 2, 2009
I just left the city and bought a 3.6 million dollar Barrington property about 800 yards from these tracks. I will continue to fight this. I don't want to have to deal with the train traffic and the noise associated with it.
Take it back to the city!!!

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