Isle libraries in tough spot - Hawaii...

Isle libraries in tough spot - Hawaii Editorials

There are 4 comments on the Honolulu Star-Bulletin story from Aug 28, 2009, titled Isle libraries in tough spot - Hawaii Editorials. In it, Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that:

As the recession has caused people to flock to public libraries, the state Board of Education is on the verge of closing all 51 libraries for two days a month to accommodate a budget shortfall.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Honolulu Star-Bulletin.

StateTaxPayer

AOL

#1 Aug 28, 2009
Keep libraries open.
Von

Aiea, HI

#2 Aug 28, 2009
I might suggest to just keep the main library open and closing everything else.

Also keep it simple and let the public do more things over the library internet service until things get better.

There are to many libraries anyway.
reporting

Honolulu, HI

#3 Aug 28, 2009
Von wrote:
I might suggest to just keep the main library open and closing everything else.
Also keep it simple and let the public do more things over the library internet service until things get better.
There are to many libraries anyway.
There are likely too many libraries open were you live, but to other areas of the island, your solution is not feasible. Close large town libraries like Kaimuki and Makiki while using the staff to help Waikiki and Manoa with the over flow. The trip from Makiki to Waikiki is only minutes, while closing Waianae will make users drive all the way to Kapolei. Also, in rural areas like the Big Island, you could find yourself 35-60 miles away from the nearest Library (even when all of them are open). There are no hot spots, there is sometimes no cell phone service, no Mobi Hele, and no internet cafes there.

There is simply no reason to take that kind of approach to this problem other than a lack of information and understanding. Naalehu library is one of the most rural libraries in the state (besides Hana) and they circulate more books per capita than any Oahu library. Their patron population from the surrounding area is only a few thousand people but they circulate 3 thousand books a month or more. HSL, the largest library in the state circulates 30k books a month, but they are surrounded by 400,000 people. By your logic, we should actually close the main State Library. But hey, I guess they would save lots of money, right?

The Library already has lots of online resources, for example, if you need Chilton manuals for cars, they have the entire collection of manuals for use free at any public library. At $30 to $100 a book at Borders there are tons of things to get for free at the library if you bothered to look. Closing libraries means people will not have access to these resources. If you just lost your job, you may not be able to afford fixing your car at a shop, but you can get the manual and do it yourself with a friend on a weekend.
Von

Aiea, HI

#4 Aug 28, 2009
reporting wrote:
<quoted text>
There are likely too many libraries open were you live, but to other areas of the island, your solution is not feasible. Close large town libraries like Kaimuki and Makiki while using the staff to help Waikiki and Manoa with the over flow. The trip from Makiki to Waikiki is only minutes, while closing Waianae will make users drive all the way to Kapolei. Also, in rural areas like the Big Island, you could find yourself 35-60 miles away from the nearest Library (even when all of them are open). There are no hot spots, there is sometimes no cell phone service, no Mobi Hele, and no internet cafes there.
There is simply no reason to take that kind of approach to this problem other than a lack of information and understanding. Naalehu library is one of the most rural libraries in the state (besides Hana) and they circulate more books per capita than any Oahu library. Their patron population from the surrounding area is only a few thousand people but they circulate 3 thousand books a month or more. HSL, the largest library in the state circulates 30k books a month, but they are surrounded by 400,000 people. By your logic, we should actually close the main State Library. But hey, I guess they would save lots of money, right?
The Library already has lots of online resources, for example, if you need Chilton manuals for cars, they have the entire collection of manuals for use free at any public library. At $30 to $100 a book at Borders there are tons of things to get for free at the library if you bothered to look. Closing libraries means people will not have access to these resources. If you just lost your job, you may not be able to afford fixing your car at a shop, but you can get the manual and do it yourself with a friend on a weekend.
Ok then your in charge.

Aloha

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