Recession Leads to Plus-Size Fashion ...

Recession Leads to Plus-Size Fashion Emergency

There are 19 comments on the findingDulcinea story from Jun 5, 2009, titled Recession Leads to Plus-Size Fashion Emergency. In it, findingDulcinea reports that:

Sales of plus-size lines have decreased more sharply during the recession than other lines.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at findingDulcinea.

Kate

Winnipeg, Canada

#1 Jun 5, 2009
We may not spend as much money but businesses are based on the bread and butter customer that keeps coming back. All else is gravy.
If 56 percent of the female population is over size 14. I wouldn't brush them aside so casually. We will find, or make clothes, or have them made. You just won't get our money. We will also remember when the recession ends who dumped us and who didn't.
Teena

New York, NY

#2 Jun 8, 2009
Kate wrote:
We may not spend as much money but businesses are based on the bread and butter customer that keeps coming back. All else is gravy.
If 56 percent of the female population is over size 14. I wouldn't brush them aside so casually. We will find, or make clothes, or have them made. You just won't get our money. We will also remember when the recession ends who dumped us and who didn't.
Here, here!
Miranda

Saint-jérôme, Canada

#3 Jun 9, 2009
As a plus-size designer, I have mixed feelings regarding this issue. I started my own clothing line because as a voluptuous woman I was getting frustrated with the lack of choice there is for plus-size women and also because my other curvaceous friends were complaining a lot as well. Now when I go see buyers to sell my line to, they tell me that even though they are interested, the sales are not there to support them. It's hard for buyers to justify spending money on plus-size clothing when in reality plus-size clothes are not selling. Of course, it's a question of what came first, the chicken or the egg? Plus-size women have been ignored for so long by retailers that I think we've learned to not make fashion a reality.But when retailers are coming up with trendier plus-size clothings, they are often ignored.

So are we not buying because there is not many choices for us out there, or are the choices limited because we are not buying???

Bottom line, if we want to see more styles out there for us, we need to get involed. We need to support the designers that are bringing new and creative designs. We need to communicate with the retailers and let them know what we want to see out there. We also have to let fashion magazines know that we want to see trendy fashionable clothes for plus-size women in their glossy colorful pages.

That's just my opinion.
NANCY FABRIKANT

New York, NY

#4 Sep 1, 2009
As a high end designer at Saks it is amazing the lack of respect this woman gets. We at Steve Fabrikant know there is a very forgotten woman out there who craves high end product because of her high profile position in business/wealth. And the stores wonder why they have tough business--we say they would rather feed smaller sizes to be the leader in so called fashion which is not profitable either. SAD.
Janet

Portland, OR

#5 Sep 1, 2009
I'm not plus sized but I often see clothes at Lane Bryant that I like and would buy, if they came in my size.
Milton Friedman

New York, NY

#6 Sep 3, 2009
It's simple economics: Onset of recession causes decrease in consumer income, and increase in cost of fabric per yard. Plus-size clothing uses far more fabric than minus-size clothing. As a result, plus-size clothes become prohibitively expensive, leading to a decline in sales.
Kate

Winnipeg, Canada

#7 Sep 7, 2009
Go to the stores at about this time of the year and see what clothes are on the rack now marked down from summer. There are loads of small size clothes and a bit of plus clothing in comparison. I don't hear them saying that small size women aren't buying clothes so they won't make them. It is a bias thing again.

Make less if the market reflects less need but cutting it out almost unilaterally!

Maybe too many people thought they would get on the wagon when plus women were telling designers and magazines what they wanted.It is a large number of pluses in the population, you know the numbers but maybe you flooded the market and now are knee jerking.

Just be reasonable. Obviously we buy clothes at this point.

Anyone got a couple of hundred pound flour or sugar sacks for sale. Oh, I forgot - you can sew a couple of beach towels together and make a kind of caftein.
Miranda wrote:
As a plus-size designer, I have mixed feelings regarding this issue. I started my own clothing line because as a voluptuous woman I was getting frustrated with the lack of choice there is for plus-size women and also because my other curvaceous friends were complaining a lot as well. Now when I go see buyers to sell my line to, they tell me that even though they are interested, the sales are not there to support them. It's hard for buyers to justify spending money on plus-size clothing when in reality plus-size clothes are not selling. Of course, it's a question of what came first, the chicken or the egg? Plus-size women have been ignored for so long by retailers that I think we've learned to not make fashion a reality.But when retailers are coming up with trendier plus-size clothings, they are often ignored.
So are we not buying because there is not many choices for us out there, or are the choices limited because we are not buying???
Bottom line, if we want to see more styles out there for us, we need to get involed. We need to support the designers that are bringing new and creative designs. We need to communicate with the retailers and let them know what we want to see out there. We also have to let fashion magazines know that we want to see trendy fashionable clothes for plus-size women in their glossy colorful pages.
That's just my opinion.
Kate

Winnipeg, Canada

#8 Sep 7, 2009
Sounds good. What size of clothing was minus size before it existed. By your logic minus size clothing should cost nothing! The opposite of prohibitively expensive. It certainly does not.

There are a whole bunch of mid size women.

You don't give a discount to the minus size gals, mid size clothes cost the same.Yet you resent having to use some of the left over material from the small clothes being used to dress her el chubbofriends. That would be simple economics.

Perhaps the decline in sales reflects the attitude you are expressing.

If I were a designer I would continue to make a few high end clothes if that was the case but I would introduce a new line of less expensive, but reasonable quality, materials for pluses. Do you look for ways to attack the problem as it exists in your eyes. The will is not there.
Milton Friedman wrote:
It's simple economics: Onset of recession causes decrease in consumer income, and increase in cost of fabric per yard. Plus-size clothing uses far more fabric than minus-size clothing. As a result, plus-size clothes become prohibitively expensive, leading to a decline in sales.
Kate

Winnipeg, Canada

#9 Sep 7, 2009
Thank you Janet. I don't know if they are one of the many plus size distributors that have joined together in cutting off clothes to the public. The funny thing is that it won't look so good when we start showing up naked at the fashion shows in protest.
Janet wrote:
I'm not plus sized but I often see clothes at Lane Bryant that I like and would buy, if they came in my size.
Hisani DuBose

AOL

#10 Oct 20, 2009
I am always searching for fashionable plus sized clothing. If these designers and stores would advertise their plus size lines the same way as the regular lines, I bet sales would increase. How else are we to know the clothes are available? Put them in the same magazines as the other lines and watch us find them. Are they introduced during Fashion Week? I think not.
Kate

Winnipeg, Canada

#11 Nov 4, 2009
A couple of loose comments.

Fashion designers often use people from the east to sew their clothes. Does the fact that between continuous exposure to them and models they do not realize how many pluses there are on this side of the ocean.

Secondly, I think that I have a insight into how this evolved. If you go back in time most of the "big" designers were gay men.Curvaceous bodies were not attractive to them. They liked the the no hip, no breast look so they chose women who looked liked young males to model their clothes. Some of us don't look like that and shouldn't.
Allis

Chennai, India

#12 Nov 18, 2009
Still plus size women find it difficult to get [url=http://plussizebeauties.c om]Plus Size Bras[/url] like G Cup Bras.
Fay

Atlanta, GA

#13 Aug 13, 2010
As a plus size woman I get very discouraged shopping for clothing. Why is it so hard for designers to understand we want beautiful clothes the same as our smaller counter parts. I would shop more and spend more money if I could get a better variety of materials and styles.
annoymous

Austin, TX

#14 Jan 27, 2011
this sucks really i couldnt find anything on my report .
annoymous

Austin, TX

#15 Jan 27, 2011
all youll people are trippin thiz web site pleaz . wut kinda of people r youll im from newyork and wuz brought here fro m tx im very pretty so comment me dueces .
nunya fokalott

Austin, TX

#17 Jan 31, 2011
iz this a web search.?answer me sumbdy type me back.
barquequey

Austin, TX

#18 Jan 31, 2011
i dont like these negative comments on line . there not nice i love fashion a lot but this comments are inapropriant
katy perry

Austin, TX

#20 Feb 1, 2011
i really think this website is a good website for plus size woman .i dedicated fireworks for the plus size women .i luv you guys .
katy perry
Margaret

AOL

#21 Nov 10, 2011
Miranda wrote:
As a plus-size designer, I have mixed feelings regarding this issue. I started my own clothing line because as a voluptuous woman I was getting frustrated with the lack of choice there is for plus-size women and also because my other curvaceous friends were complaining a lot as well. Now when I go see buyers to sell my line to, they tell me that even though they are interested, the sales are not there to support them. It's hard for buyers to justify spending money on plus-size clothing when in reality plus-size clothes are not selling. Of course, it's a question of what came first, the chicken or the egg? Plus-size women have been ignored for so long by retailers that I think we've learned to not make fashion a reality.But when retailers are coming up with trendier plus-size clothings, they are often ignored.
So are we not buying because there is not many choices for us out there, or are the choices limited because we are not buying???
Bottom line, if we want to see more styles out there for us, we need to get involed. We need to support the designers that are bringing new and creative designs. We need to communicate with the retailers and let them know what we want to see out there. We also have to let fashion magazines know that we want to see trendy fashionable clothes for plus-size women in their glossy colorful pages.
That's just my opinion.
What is the name of the company? Is it still in business?

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