Univ Chapel Removes Pews to Accommodate Muslims

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“animis opibusque parati”

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#1
Jun 11, 2013
 
http://preview.tinyurl.com/lo6ukl6

U of Chicago Chapel Removes Christian Pews to Accomodate Muslims;
Pews Defiled for “Modern Art” Exhibit

By Debbie Schlussel

I get that this chapel removed Christian pews because, after all, we must show our “tolerance” of Muslims -- which means America and its Judeo-Christian heritage bending over for Islam with more flexibility and repetition than a gymnast nyphomaniac. But I just don’t get why this is exhibit is called “13th Ballad,” instead of the more appropriate,“12th Imam.” Oh, and by the way, despite Christian pews being defiled in a modern art exhibit, American Christians didn’t start a frenzy-filled, murderous rampage, engaging in mass killing of Muslims. Imagine that. We are actually civilized, as we roll over and allow the country to continue to be invaded and the cancer to continue to metastasize within.

***Upon entering the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s Kovler Atrium, audiences will find rows of pews from University of Chicago’s Bond Chapel. The pews were removed in order to provide Muslim students a place to pray. Above the pews hangs a large-scale double-cross sculpture filled with household items such as umbrellas, dented cans for non-perishables, and wine glasses.

The installation will be activated with performances throughout the summer by artist Theaster Gates. The installation is titled 13th Ballad and intertwines concepts and theories, a familiar practice for the Gates. Here we see the relationship between religion, migration and accumulation. Gates’ work intervenes and it is this intervention that serves not as another example of gentrification, but of the possibilities of art in the face of despair.***

[Emphasis added.]

Think there will ever be a day when korans or Muslim prayer mats are turned into a “contemporary art” exhibit, complete with broken umbrellas and dented cans? Think again. That’s not the way the wind is blowing or will ever blow again in America’s future generations.

“Queen of my domain”

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#2
Jun 11, 2013
 
bonking head

When will we ever "get" it?

I don't think I'll live long enough to see Muslim prayer mats turned into an art exhibition.

Since: Apr 13

Hilliard, OH

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#3
Jun 11, 2013
 

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gokeefe wrote:
bonking head
When will we ever "get" it?
I don't think I'll live long enough to see Muslim prayer mats turned into an art exhibition.
Who wants to get that close to the stench? They need to be used for the range:

http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/city...
Chow Hound

Arlington Heights, IL

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#4
Jun 11, 2013
 

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gokeefe wrote:
bonking head
When will we ever "get" it?
I don't think I'll live long enough to see Muslim prayer mats turned into an art exhibition.
The bed bugs in filthy Chicagostan will have a new home.
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

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#5
Jun 11, 2013
 

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gokeefe wrote:
bonking head
When will we ever "get" it?
I don't think I'll live long enough to see Muslim prayer mats turned into an art exhibition.
Early Christian Churches did not have pews. In fact, the lack of pews is very common in Russian churches (and other denominations) even here in the states.

In Christianity, there is also the theory of economics ... Which basically is a cross between mercy and common sense. For example, if you are from a Coptic Church and have no local church to receive communion, you are allowed to receive communion at a Catholic Church and vice versa.

I wouldn't be surprised if that theory wasn't applicable here. In Europe, there are some buildings that were used both as churches and as mosques ... Some voluntarily and some by force.

Yes it has happened voluntarily.
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

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#6
Jun 11, 2013
 
Not economics ... Economos (spell check run amok)
Enzyte Bob

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#7
Jun 11, 2013
 
One example here in the states

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/02/18/churches...

“Queen of my domain”

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Jun 11, 2013
 

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Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
Early Christian Churches did not have pews. In fact, the lack of pews is very common in Russian churches (and other denominations) even here in the states.
In Christianity, there is also the theory of economics ... Which basically is a cross between mercy and common sense. For example, if you are from a Coptic Church and have no local church to receive communion, you are allowed to receive communion at a Catholic Church and vice versa.
I wouldn't be surprised if that theory wasn't applicable here. In Europe, there are some buildings that were used both as churches and as mosques ... Some voluntarily and some by force.
Yes it has happened voluntarily.
Knew most of this. A lot of churches in the US and Europe used to charge a "pew rent" in the 1800s and early 20th century. I've actually seen a few records of it in the Cleveland diocese (which included Toledo until about 1910). So my thinking is pews likely came into being as a way to rake in some cold cash, I can't imagine that no one would have thought of this idea in medieval Europe. Pretty certain they had some type of twist on that idea.

No doubt there is validity to your theory (arteests in the family and all, if I tossed this at the kid who teaches art, she'd probably give me a long winded lecture on it), but this just seems silly and ludicrous to me--to eliminate pews in a Christian place of worship to accommodate Muslims.
Enzyte Bob

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Jun 11, 2013
 

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From Wikipedia:

In the Eastern Orthodox, Greek-Catholic Churches, Latin Catholic Church,[1] and in the teaching of the Church Fathers which undergirds the theology of those Churches, economy or oeconomy (Greek: &#959;&#7984;&#954 ;&#959;&#957;&#959 ;&#956;&#943;&#945 ;, oikonomia) has several meanings.[2] The basic meaning of the word is "handling" or "disposition" or "management" or more literally "housekeeping" of a thing, usually assuming or implying good or prudent handling (as opposed to poor handling) of the matter at hand. In short, economia is discretionary deviation from the letter of the law in order to adhere to the spirit of the law and charity. This is in contrast to legalism, or akribia (Greek: &#945;&#954;&#961; &#953;&#946;&#949; &#953;&#945;)—strict adherence to the letter of the law of the church.

As such, the word "economy", and the concept attaching to it, are utilized especially with regard to two types of "handling":(a) divine economy, that is, God's "handling" or "management" of the fallen state of the world and of mankind — the arrangements he made in order to bring about man's salvation after the Fall; and (b) what might be termed pastoral economy (or) ecclesiastical economy, that is, the Church's "handling" or "management" of various pastoral and disciplinary questions, problems, and issues that have arisen through the centuries of Church history.

...

An example in the New Testament of the application of lenient economy, or "economy according to leniency", is found in Acts chapter 15, where the Apostles decided to limit the number and degree of Jewish observances that would be required of Gentile converts. An example in the New Testament of the application of strict economy, or "economy according to exactness (or, strictness, preciseness)[akribeia]", may be seen in Acts 16:3, when St. Paul set aside the usual rule to circumcise Timothy, whose father was a gentile, to placate certain Jewish Christians. In both instances, economy was exercised to facilitate the salvation of some of the parties involved.

In Orthodox Church history, examples and instances of economy abound. Since ancient times, converts to the Church who were coming from certain heretical groups were not required to be baptized, even though the normal path of entrance to the Church was through baptism. Thus the Church, guided by the Holy Spirit, decided that under specific conditions, the application of economy (i.e. according to leniency) would be the norm in this matter. But since the usual rule is baptism, such leniency can easily be, and sometimes has been, suspended (usually in periods when the heretical groups in question were actively opposing the Church). In these cases, the Church returned to her customary usual rule of "exactness," not applying economy (or not applying economy according to lenience). In calling for the reception of converts into Orthodoxy through means other than baptism in certain cases, the Ecumenical Councils made no determination regarding the existence of sacraments outside of Orthodoxy, but only addressed the situation of the convert to Orthodoxy.
Enzyte Bob

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#10
Jun 11, 2013
 
More from wiki ...

Churches were not commonly furnished with permanent pews before the Protestant Reformation. The rise of the sermon as a central act of Christian worship, especially in Protestantism, made the pew a standard item of church furniture.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pew

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#11
Jun 11, 2013
 

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It's beyond silly. Boycott the Univ of Chicago. Boycott Chicago. This country had better wake up.

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Jun 11, 2013
 

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Have a look at how it's going in France. If you're brave enough.

http://downloads.cbn.com/cbnnewsplayer/cbnpla...

“animis opibusque parati”

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#13
Jun 11, 2013
 
Enzyte Bob wrote:
More from wiki ...
Churches were not commonly furnished with permanent pews before the Protestant Reformation. The rise of the sermon as a central act of Christian worship, especially in Protestantism, made the pew a standard item of church furniture.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pew
Welcome to the 21st century where Christian churches have pews.
Pews which should not be displaced for a false and violent "religion."

“Queen of my domain”

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Jun 11, 2013
 

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Seriouslady wrote:
It's beyond silly. Boycott the Univ of Chicago. Boycott Chicago. This country had better wake up.
Oh nooooos! I could never boycott Chicago. One of my favorite places on the planet. What would I do without the occasional trip to the Magnificent Mile and my boutique B&Bs while shopping and museum hopping and the Navy Pier? I LOVE Chicago!! I think I need to plan a weekend there this summer or fall.

People just need to start speaking up more.
Enzyte Bob

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#15
Jun 11, 2013
 
-tip- wrote:
<quoted text>
Welcome to the 21st century where Christian churches have pews.
Pews which should not be displaced for a false and violent "religion."
Another viewpoint:

1) Pews teach the lay people to stay in their place, which is to passively watch what's going on up front, where the clergy perform the Liturgy on their behalf. Pews preach and teach that religion and spirituality is the job of the priest, to whom we pay a salary to be religious for us, since it is just too much trouble and just too difficult for the rest of us to be spiritual in the real world of modern North America. Pews serve the same purpose as seats in theaters and bleachers in the ball park; we perch on them (even during the Litanies which are the specific prayer of the People) to watch the professionals perform: the clergy and the professionally-trained altar servers, while the professionally-trained choir sings for our entertainment.

2) In teaching us to sit back and relax, pews give us the impression that any inconvenience, much less suffering no matter how slight, is foreign to the Christian life. Aren't you supposed to enjoy church and have fun as a Christian?...

4) Pews fill up the open space in the middle of our temples, where the clergy and the people used to join together in a sort of sacred dance as the clergy, censing and processing, moved amidst the constantly changing configuration of the Laity.

Today this is reduced to the priest and servers marching in and marching out. How can we dance with pews on the ballroom floor? Pews transform worship for us into the merely formal and frosty affair that it has become in mainline American religion. The colder worship gets, the less attention we must pay to the unreal demands that religion, as our forebears knew it, puts on us. Certainly we can't allow our religion to become our way of life, if we expect to get ahead in the real world.

...

6) Although pews are admittedly not a feature of the Orthodox liturgical tradition as our ancestors knew it, we're in America now, and here things are different. We need to be relevant. The more we can be just like the big and important religions in America, the more influence Orthodox Christianity will have. We can't afford to lose our big chance to mold American thought, and we will lose it if we cling to silly traditions with a little t, like pewless temples....

7) Thanks to pews, on the weekdays of Lent we no longer have to endure those humiliating prostrations. Other [Christian groups] don't do that kind of thing in church, not even the Catholics. Why should we? And during funerals, pews spare us from gathering around the casket like we used to. Isn't the function of the modern funeral to shield us from the unpleasantness of death? The accepted modern American view is that we never really die—we just fade away.

These blunt observations are not meant to offend, but to hammer the point home vividly. The Liturgical Movement and the Orthodox liturgical tradition are both absolutely right: what we do in liturgical worship molds our thinking, attitudes and behavior. That's precisely why the issue of pews is so critically important.

More:

http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/pews.aspx
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

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#16
Jun 11, 2013
 
Seriouslady wrote:
Have a look at how it's going in France. If you're brave enough.
http://downloads.cbn.com/cbnnewsplayer/cbnpla...
1 million people just showed up to protest gay marriage in France. that means the church is alive and well in France even if the people don't attend services every Sunday.

Europeans don't make a big production out of going to church like Americans do. Church teachings are embedded in the cultural fabric of most European countries as civil behavior and the act of going to church is considered somewhat dated and superfluous. But make no mistake most European still do consider themselves Christians and they still go to church on the holidays. If you ever see churches empty in France on Christmas or Easter that is when you'll know that Christianity is has dying. sparse attendance on a typical sunday means nothing.
Enzyte Bob

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#17
Jun 11, 2013
 
Post 9/11, some Muslims pray in Christian churches

082811

Hundreds of Muslims in have been meeting at hall in Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Alexandria since August to pray while their new mosque is being built.

By Carlos Hamann – ALEXANDRIA, 2011-08-31

In a Catholic church located in the shadow of Mount Vernon, the estate of George Washington, the first US president, a group of Muslim faithful roll out their prayer rugs each week and kneel to pray to Allah.

Polls show that Islam in the United States is mistrusted and associated with violence, and Christian churches actively helping Muslims remain the exception ten years after the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Yet inspired by their reading of Biblical passages, some US Christians are increasingly reaching out to the Muslim community.

“People true to their Christian faith try to achieve peace in the world,” said Father Tom Ferguson at the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Alexandria, Virginia.“Hospitality is the first step towards getting to know one another.”
Hundreds of area Muslims have been meeting at a hall in his church since August to pray while their new mosque is being built.

http://www.icna.org/post-911-some-muslims-pra...
Enzyte Bob

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#18
Jun 11, 2013
 
30/08/2010 / ITALY
Priest invites Muslism without a Mosque to pray in churchyard
photo Catholic Church far-right immigration Islam Italy Ramadan
Muslim faithful pray under a tent set up by the Church of Gallarate in its courtyard.

In the town of Gallarate, north of Milan, Muslims have no mosque in which to celebrate Ramadan. Instead, for the past three years, they have prayed in a plot of land belonging to...the local church.
The parish of San-Nazario and Celso set up a large, carpeted tent in an unused courtyard behind their church to offer their Muslim neighbours a place of worship during Ramadan. The local priest, Father Adriano Colombo, took this initiative in the hope of "opening dialogue between different cultures". The townspeople were reluctant at first, but eventually came to terms with the decision.
Gallarate counts about 50,000 inhabitants, of which 2,500 are Muslim. It is situated in a region led by the Northern League, Umberto Bossi’s xenophobic and far-right party.

CONTRIBUTORS
Hamid Khartaoui

"We are very grateful to the church for its hospitality, but we wish we could have a place of our own"

Hamid Khartaoui, 43, is originally from Morocco. He has lived in Gallarate for 22 years and ...

http://observers.france24.com/content/2010083...

“animis opibusque parati”

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#19
Jun 11, 2013
 
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
Another viewpoint:
1) Pews teach the lay people to stay in their place, which is to passively watch what's going on up front, where the clergy perform the Liturgy on their behalf. Pews preach and teach that religion and spirituality is the job of the priest, to whom we pay a salary to be religious for us, since it is just too much trouble and just too difficult for the rest of us to be spiritual in the real world of modern North America. Pews serve the same purpose as seats in theaters and bleachers in the ball park; we perch on them (even during the Litanies which are the specific prayer of the People) to watch the professionals perform: the clergy and the professionally-trained altar servers, while the professionally-trained choir sings for our entertainment.
2) In teaching us to sit back and relax, pews give us the impression that any inconvenience, much less suffering no matter how slight, is foreign to the Christian life. Aren't you supposed to enjoy church and have fun as a Christian?...
4) Pews fill up the open space in the middle of our temples, where the clergy and the people used to join together in a sort of sacred dance as the clergy, censing and processing, moved amidst the constantly changing configuration of the Laity.
Today this is reduced to the priest and servers marching in and marching out. How can we dance with pews on the ballroom floor? Pews transform worship for us into the merely formal and frosty affair that it has become in mainline American religion. The colder worship gets, the less attention we must pay to the unreal demands that religion, as our forebears knew it, puts on us. Certainly we can't allow our religion to become our way of life, if we expect to get ahead in the real world.
...
6) Although pews are admittedly not a feature of the Orthodox liturgical tradition as our ancestors knew it, we're in America now, and here things are different. We need to be relevant. The more we can be just like the big and important religions in America, the more influence Orthodox Christianity will have. We can't afford to lose our big chance to mold American thought, and we will lose it if we cling to silly traditions with a little t, like pewless temples....
7) Thanks to pews, on the weekdays of Lent we no longer have to endure those humiliating prostrations. Other [Christian groups] don't do that kind of thing in church, not even the Catholics. Why should we? And during funerals, pews spare us from gathering around the casket like we used to. Isn't the function of the modern funeral to shield us from the unpleasantness of death? The accepted modern American view is that we never really die—we just fade away.
These blunt observations are not meant to offend, but to hammer the point home vividly. The Liturgical Movement and the Orthodox liturgical tradition are both absolutely right: what we do in liturgical worship molds our thinking, attitudes and behavior. That's precisely why the issue of pews is so critically important.
More:
http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/pews.aspx
Yes, Bob. Times have changed.
We enjoy lives of immense leisure as never imagined by our forebears.
The Israelites stood for hours on the Sabbath as the Word of the LORD was read.

But none of that has a whit to do with submitting to the demands of Muslims.

“animis opibusque parati”

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#20
Jun 11, 2013
 

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Enzyte Bob wrote:
Post 9/11, some Muslims pray in Christian churches
082811
Hundreds of Muslims in have been meeting at hall in Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Alexandria since August to pray while their new mosque is being built.
By Carlos Hamann – ALEXANDRIA, 2011-08-31
In a Catholic church located in the shadow of Mount Vernon, the estate of George Washington, the first US president, a group of Muslim faithful roll out their prayer rugs each week and kneel to pray to Allah.
Polls show that Islam in the United States is mistrusted and associated with violence, and Christian churches actively helping Muslims remain the exception ten years after the September 11 terrorist attacks.
Yet inspired by their reading of Biblical passages, some US Christians are increasingly reaching out to the Muslim community.
“People true to their Christian faith try to achieve peace in the world,” said Father Tom Ferguson at the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Alexandria, Virginia.“Hospitality is the first step towards getting to know one another.”
Hundreds of area Muslims have been meeting at a hall in his church since August to pray while their new mosque is being built.
http://www.icna.org/post-911-some-muslims-pra...
Fools will be fools.

http://shariaunveiled.wordpress.com/tag/islam...

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