The Feds' Invasive Student Tracking D...

“Don't trust the internet!”

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#22 Mar 8, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>
Ctrl+F to find the text "religious affiliation" if you can't find such link.
Read? I found it, no problem, first try.
I found the link (to the religious affiliation list).

What I failed to see anywhere is any indication that the fact that someone has created a system that COULD aggregate a wide variety of information from a wide variety of educational institutions public and private means that the federal government has any intention of mandating the collection of anything.

In fact, a whole slew of very similar information is requested when students take the ACT. I don't know that there is anything mandating a response to any of the questions--but I would imagine most students respond to most of the questions. This is included in what is released to colleges with the ACT score. Most believe it is in their interest, in terms of admissions, to reply to a lot of questions about extra-curriculars, jobs, hobbies, parents education level and a whole lot of other stuff.

I would imagine that the College Board is among the potential clients for this particular group.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#23 Mar 8, 2013
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I found the link (to the religious affiliation list).
What I failed to see anywhere is any indication that the fact that someone has created a system that COULD aggregate a wide variety of information from a wide variety of educational institutions public and private means that the federal government has any intention of mandating the collection of anything.
In fact, a whole slew of very similar information is requested when students take the ACT. I don't know that there is anything mandating a response to any of the questions--but I would imagine most students respond to most of the questions. This is included in what is released to colleges with the ACT score. Most believe it is in their interest, in terms of admissions, to reply to a lot of questions about extra-curriculars, jobs, hobbies, parents education level and a whole lot of other stuff.
I would imagine that the College Board is among the potential clients for this particular group.
Someone has. Tip provided this. See the home page.

In particular, see this link. It is an argument for open data in education. Which I don't necessarily agree with. Here is a relevant quote from that article:

"Simply put, education needs raw, real-time data.

For example: if you have an educational game generating data about a student, it should be accessible immediately, not compiled at the end of the year when it is no longer raw nor immediate. By then, it's likely irrelevant--it's data about a student who has already graduated from the classroom in which that information could have been useful.

But instead of raw, real-time data, we have aggregate school reporting, state and national statistics, and inaccessible or less usable data forms like PDFs or school-held CDs.

In addition, a lot of data is collected and used, but not everyone collects the same information, much less stores it the same way or works to share it. Without a good way to see and sort aggregate data, it's not useful."

Read?

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#24 Mar 8, 2013
forgot link to the article:

http://opensource.com/education/10/8/importan...

linked off of the home page that leads to the data Tip provided
Wait what

Galion, OH

#25 Mar 8, 2013
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I found the link (to the religious affiliation list).
What I failed to see anywhere is any indication that the fact that someone has created a system that COULD aggregate a wide variety of information from a wide variety of educational institutions public and private means that the federal government has any intention of mandating the collection of anything.
In fact, a whole slew of very similar information is requested when students take the ACT. I don't know that there is anything mandating a response to any of the questions--but I would imagine most students respond to most of the questions. This is included in what is released to colleges with the ACT score. Most believe it is in their interest, in terms of admissions, to reply to a lot of questions about extra-curriculars, jobs, hobbies, parents education level and a whole lot of other stuff.
I would imagine that the College Board is among the potential clients for this particular group.
From what you post to what I'm about to post is the middle. Care to see it, or simply ignore it?

http://www.ksn.com/content/news/also/story/St...

“Don't trust the internet!”

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#26 Mar 9, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>
Someone has. Tip provided this. See the home page.
In particular, see this link. It is an argument for open data in education. Which I don't necessarily agree with. Here is a relevant quote from that article:
"Simply put, education needs raw, real-time data.
For example: if you have an educational game generating data about a student, it should be accessible immediately, not compiled at the end of the year when it is no longer raw nor immediate. By then, it's likely irrelevant--it's data about a student who has already graduated from the classroom in which that information could have been useful.
But instead of raw, real-time data, we have aggregate school reporting, state and national statistics, and inaccessible or less usable data forms like PDFs or school-held CDs.
In addition, a lot of data is collected and used, but not everyone collects the same information, much less stores it the same way or works to share it. Without a good way to see and sort aggregate data, it's not useful."
Read?
That is a response far more worthy of the knowledge that I know you possess, and a far more interesting discussion than tip's (and Malkin's) hysteria about the feds coming to intrude into personal information.

My reading of the project (and yes, I did move around the site) is that it concerns students in the k-20 span. This enables tracking data over some critical junctures (such as college entry, but also across other K-12 junctures where they may change systems or where a distict's own data may be fractured).

And that something that I know a bit about. I am not knowledgeable about data systems, but I do understand that a portion of holding education accountable for education is being able to track student success as they move into post-secondary situations. So, from a needed-knowledge standpoint, this potentially fulfills a basic need.

Knowing a bit about how some of these gigantic efforts get going, I would suggest that there was some initial identification of potential stakeholders--which would have included both public and private education across the k-20 spectrum, as well as folks like College Board, ACT/SAT, and who knows who else based on their need OR their current role in tracking data. Then they surveyed these folks about what data they are currently collecting and might have a need for. As a result, the intended product (not sure if this even exists yet) included capability for tracking darn near anything that anyone is already keeping track of.

I would also suggest--again, based on history--that when/if this project moves into becoming a useful reality, they will have to deal with critical questions about who gets to share data with whom. Generally customers want maximum access to other folks stuff and maximum control over their own.

And since this is a semi-public undertaking, we get to see what is going on.

Not at all, for instance, like those "loyalty tags" most of us carry around in abundance on our key rings. We get discounts, so we let people track our buying habits.

“Don't trust the internet!”

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#27 Mar 9, 2013
Wait what wrote:
<quoted text>
From what you post to what I'm about to post is the middle. Care to see it, or simply ignore it?
http://www.ksn.com/content/news/also/story/St...
Interesting questions.

I think that in terms of knowing where students are (or importantly are not) on campus, there are other low-tech ways that a school with high attendance/truancy rates have probably not been using. And they have the advantage of requiring person-to-person contact, which is the sort of thing that has been proven effective in combating poor attendance, etc.

Also seems like a pretty easy system to subvert (give your ID to someone who IS going to class).

I think that the sad thing is that these kinds of alarmist discussions tend to divert energy from more meaningful discussions regarding how best to attack/resolve the initial problem.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#28 Mar 9, 2013
The problem with "data systems" is not the data itself. Stakeholders have to agree upon a common purpose, and with the scope as large as this, it's going to be difficult to drill it down much further.

Not everyone is keen to having their kid tracked this way. After all, I'm not certain that I would want data that tracks my kid a la GPS style from school door to bus to home. That does to me permit an invasion of privacy.

Now, if the data were to track performance only, in an aggregated way, so as not to permit any personal identification, I won't have a problem with it.

I may be wrong, but this is part of what Tip is attacking--the data can be abused and no one needs to know my child's movements on that type of level.

It is true that we enable retailers to track our buying habits with loyalty cards and also via the internet. We also do that every time we make a purchase with a credit or debit card. But those numbers are mostly aggregated; except for those loyalty cards. But the data for the loyalty card isn't revealed until time of purchase--go to Giant Eagle, scan the card, you get your discounts and customized coupons for products you just bought or are similar substitutes for those products. And there is NO personally identifiable information tied into that--the cards each have a bar code that is not tied back to your name, SSN, or other personal information.

One of the issues with the type of data tracking for students is who is going to gaurd this data and HOW is it going to be guarded. I saw no plan or statement that defined how it was encrypted, how it was "keyed"--related to each other, my guess it would have to be related directly to some type of student ID number (SSN? If so, I'd beetch up a storm, not sure if that's legal to do), etc. Ripe, easy to attack if someone knew what they were doing. And there are plenty of people out there who KNOW how to hack systems like those.

Just my two cents.

“Ludibrium est onus genio”

Since: Dec 11

Planet Earth

#29 Mar 9, 2013
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I found the link (to the religious affiliation list).
What I failed to see anywhere is any indication that the fact that someone has created a system that COULD aggregate a wide variety of information from a wide variety of educational institutions public and private means that the federal government has any intention of mandating the collection of anything.
Uh... "They started coming up with ways to reward states that played ball and sanction states that didn't" creates a de facto mandate. It's the 55 MPH speed limit all over again.
Wait what

Galion, OH

#30 Mar 9, 2013
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting questions.
I think that in terms of knowing where students are (or importantly are not) on campus, there are other low-tech ways that a school with high attendance/truancy rates have probably not been using. And they have the advantage of requiring person-to-person contact, which is the sort of thing that has been proven effective in combating poor attendance, etc.
Also seems like a pretty easy system to subvert (give your ID to someone who IS going to class).
I think that the sad thing is that these kinds of alarmist discussions tend to divert energy from more meaningful discussions regarding how best to attack/resolve the initial problem.
Alarmist? Do you understand that wearing these types of devices during puberty can potentially cause breast cancer in young women? Do you understand that a creep can monitor any child wearing one of these devices without you ever knowing? You betcha it's alarming, and to blow it off as 'alarming discussions' is naive, at best.

By the way, if you peruse the .gov & .edu sites you will find many answers to your non-alarmist discussion. It's out there, if you care to view it. I have a feeling you don't, because you don't like to lose control of your world view.
Wait what

Galion, OH

#31 Mar 9, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
The problem with "data systems" is not the data itself. Stakeholders have to agree upon a common purpose, and with the scope as large as this, it's going to be difficult to drill it down much further.
Not everyone is keen to having their kid tracked this way. After all, I'm not certain that I would want data that tracks my kid a la GPS style from school door to bus to home. That does to me permit an invasion of privacy.
Now, if the data were to track performance only, in an aggregated way, so as not to permit any personal identification, I won't have a problem with it.
I may be wrong, but this is part of what Tip is attacking--the data can be abused and no one needs to know my child's movements on that type of level.
It is true that we enable retailers to track our buying habits with loyalty cards and also via the internet. We also do that every time we make a purchase with a credit or debit card. But those numbers are mostly aggregated; except for those loyalty cards. But the data for the loyalty card isn't revealed until time of purchase--go to Giant Eagle, scan the card, you get your discounts and customized coupons for products you just bought or are similar substitutes for those products. And there is NO personally identifiable information tied into that--the cards each have a bar code that is not tied back to your name, SSN, or other personal information.
One of the issues with the type of data tracking for students is who is going to gaurd this data and HOW is it going to be guarded. I saw no plan or statement that defined how it was encrypted, how it was "keyed"--related to each other, my guess it would have to be related directly to some type of student ID number (SSN? If so, I'd beetch up a storm, not sure if that's legal to do), etc. Ripe, easy to attack if someone knew what they were doing. And there are plenty of people out there who KNOW how to hack systems like those.
Just my two cents.
Your card purchases are not only trackable to your person (unless you fill out an application with fake info, never log in online at the merchant to receive discounts and never use a credit/debit card), but your buying information can be subpoenaed.
Wait what

Galion, OH

#32 Mar 9, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
The problem with "data systems" is not the data itself. Stakeholders have to agree upon a common purpose, and with the scope as large as this, it's going to be difficult to drill it down much further.
Not everyone is keen to having their kid tracked this way. After all, I'm not certain that I would want data that tracks my kid a la GPS style from school door to bus to home. That does to me permit an invasion of privacy.
Now, if the data were to track performance only, in an aggregated way, so as not to permit any personal identification, I won't have a problem with it.
I may be wrong, but this is part of what Tip is attacking--the data can be abused and no one needs to know my child's movements on that type of level.
It is true that we enable retailers to track our buying habits with loyalty cards and also via the internet. We also do that every time we make a purchase with a credit or debit card. But those numbers are mostly aggregated; except for those loyalty cards. But the data for the loyalty card isn't revealed until time of purchase--go to Giant Eagle, scan the card, you get your discounts and customized coupons for products you just bought or are similar substitutes for those products. And there is NO personally identifiable information tied into that--the cards each have a bar code that is not tied back to your name, SSN, or other personal information.
One of the issues with the type of data tracking for students is who is going to gaurd this data and HOW is it going to be guarded. I saw no plan or statement that defined how it was encrypted, how it was "keyed"--related to each other, my guess it would have to be related directly to some type of student ID number (SSN? If so, I'd beetch up a storm, not sure if that's legal to do), etc. Ripe, easy to attack if someone knew what they were doing. And there are plenty of people out there who KNOW how to hack systems like those.
Just my two cents.
Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR 99.31):

School officials with legitimate educational interest;
Other schools to which a student is transferring;
Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;
Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;
Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school;
Accrediting organizations;
To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.

http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa...

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#33 Mar 9, 2013
Wait what wrote:
<quoted text>
Your card purchases are not only trackable to your person (unless you fill out an application with fake info, never log in online at the merchant to receive discounts and never use a credit/debit card), but your buying information can be subpoenaed.
Yes and I did gloss over that for a reason.

Credit cards (any financial data)is encrypted both during transmission and at rest. Meaning, it needs to be "scrambled" with a code so that it cannot be used except within a one-on-one exchange between the buyer, merchant, and bank. This data is not aggregated--the credit card information or the buyer. What Reader and Tip are discussing is data mining, looking at trends and populations. Not one on one data exchanges.

I agree buying information can be subpeonaed and HAS been subpeonaed in criminal and fraud cases. And will reiterate that hackers can and will continue to attack financial data and personally identifiable data in order to commit fraud.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#34 Mar 9, 2013
Wait what wrote:
<quoted text>
Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR 99.31):
School officials with legitimate educational interest;
Other schools to which a student is transferring;
Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;
Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;
Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school;
Accrediting organizations;
To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.
http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa...
Again, why I was emphasizing aggregated data and questioning how this data was keyed and compiled. Not sure how performance data is extracted and indexed. In no way was I even mentioning or championing releasing individual student performance records.
Wait what

Galion, OH

#35 Mar 9, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes and I did gloss over that for a reason.
Credit cards (any financial data)is encrypted both during transmission and at rest. Meaning, it needs to be "scrambled" with a code so that it cannot be used except within a one-on-one exchange between the buyer, merchant, and bank. This data is not aggregated--the credit card information or the buyer. What Reader and Tip are discussing is data mining, looking at trends and populations. Not one on one data exchanges.
I agree buying information can be subpeonaed and HAS been subpeonaed in criminal and fraud cases. And will reiterate that hackers can and will continue to attack financial data and personally identifiable data in order to commit fraud.
I am not talking about financial transactions, criminal transactions or fraud transactions. I am talking about collecting your (and your children's) personal information for distribution and you will never know it's being distributed because there are loopholes in every privacy act mandated by the government. Additionally, subpoenas for your personal information are used for more than criminal acts - they are used in contested divorces, as one example. Similarly, did you know that if you apply for insurance as an individual an insurance company can look to see if you're using loyalty cards, pull the info and decide if you buy too much junk food and are therefore a high risk? Or see what kinds of medications you're buying (and if you forget to list one, your insurance is cancelled for fraud).

How far is too far? We are tracking our children for their good. It's way too much of a slippery slope for my comfort.
Wait what

Galion, OH

#36 Mar 9, 2013
"When the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) hosts a workshop, titled "The Big Picture: Comprehensive Data Collection," on December 6, 2012, to explore the practices and privacy implications of the comprehensive collection of data about consumers' online activities, it should expand the scope of its examination. One topic germane to the workshop's consideration but seemingly not on the agenda is the adequacy of privacy protections for public sector consumers (including students and staff in educational institutions and employees of federal, state or local governments) who use cloud-based systems. It behooves the FTC to also include these consumers in its examination of the privacy implications of cloud services.

There are, of course, sound business reasons why cloud service providers aggregate data across multiple accounts and services: the results are extremely valuable. Seemingly unrelated personal data, when aggregated and mined at large scale, can provide immense value to advertisers, marketers, corporate sales forces, and others. The revenue generated by combining and monetizing such data -- by mining the mosaic -- is the reason "free" cloud services can afford to be free. But that, in turn, means that cloud services come with a hidden cost - because there really is no such thing as a free lunch. That hidden cost is the loss of privacy (and even, in extreme cases, the loss of security) that comes with a pervasive data aggregation and analysis regime."

http://fcw.com/articles/2012/12/04/ftc-privac...

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#37 Mar 9, 2013
Wait what wrote:
<quoted text>
I am not talking about financial transactions, criminal transactions or fraud transactions. I am talking about collecting your (and your children's) personal information for distribution and you will never know it's being distributed because there are loopholes in every privacy act mandated by the government. Additionally, subpoenas for your personal information are used for more than criminal acts - they are used in contested divorces, as one example. Similarly, did you know that if you apply for insurance as an individual an insurance company can look to see if you're using loyalty cards, pull the info and decide if you buy too much junk food and are therefore a high risk? Or see what kinds of medications you're buying (and if you forget to list one, your insurance is cancelled for fraud).
How far is too far? We are tracking our children for their good. It's way too much of a slippery slope for my comfort.
I am not disagreeing. But I do see this in a different light.

We do need some type of tracking mechanism to audit schools, to be able to understand whether schools are successful. There can be methods of extracting performance data away from individual students and keying/indexing it to the school or district itself. There is considerable noise out there about non-performance of schools, low graduation rates, and rewarding poorly performing teachers and administrators. I don't know what that answer is, but part of that answer could be found in analyzing the aggregate data and I don't even know what rules or laws surround that, or even what data is captured (is the SSN captured for each student or is the student assigned a random ID number and there is NO correlation to the public to the student and that random number)?

PII is a tricky concept. I work with it each and every day. Once basically any SNN or identifying factors such as race, address, gender are removed, it's often not considered PII.

As a matter of fact, digital data did become a factor in my divorce. I won't spill details here, suffice it to say, it was obtained and used in my case against the ex--there was some removal of 401K funds--spouses are required to co-sign removals and some other nonsense. We did find evidence of him forging signatures and moving funds out of joint accounts as well as some illegal activities. That was over 10 years ago now.

I am not sure about the loyalty cards. That would take a considerable amount of effort and proof that the insurance company would need to chase. I haven't heard anything regarding such, but would not know.

I'm just replying with facts as I know them, not challenging, not saying who is right or who is wrong here. Data is a tricky thing in many instances, and stripping away the PII to aggregate it may not be violating privacy laws here. And yes, there are loopholes, but I tend to think the problems are not in how the data is used or distributed, but rather lie more in who actually controls or is custodian of that data. That is where the unethical behavior begins. Aggregated data (data summed by say district that shows graduation rates, performance levels by grade, etc. rather than individual) really won't have many holes in it for fraud or criminal conduct. But it also data that can be manipulated, massaged, etc. to benefit those who generate it or control it--witness the brouhaha that erupted recently about attendance data in the Columbus Public Schools.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#38 Mar 9, 2013
SNN - should be SSN (social security #). Typo. Mea culpa.

“Don't trust the internet!”

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#39 Mar 9, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
The problem with "data systems" is not the data itself. Stakeholders have to agree upon a common purpose, and with the scope as large as this, it's going to be difficult to drill it down much further.
Not everyone is keen to having their kid tracked this way. After all, I'm not certain that I would want data that tracks my kid a la GPS style from school door to bus to home. That does to me permit an invasion of privacy.
Now, if the data were to track performance only, in an aggregated way, so as not to permit any personal identification, I won't have a problem with it.
I may be wrong, but this is part of what Tip is attacking--the data can be abused and no one needs to know my child's movements on that type of level.
It is true that we enable retailers to track our buying habits with loyalty cards and also via the internet. We also do that every time we make a purchase with a credit or debit card. But those numbers are mostly aggregated; except for those loyalty cards. But the data for the loyalty card isn't revealed until time of purchase--go to Giant Eagle, scan the card, you get your discounts and customized coupons for products you just bought or are similar substitutes for those products. And there is NO personally identifiable information tied into that--the cards each have a bar code that is not tied back to your name, SSN, or other personal information.
One of the issues with the type of data tracking for students is who is going to gaurd this data and HOW is it going to be guarded. I saw no plan or statement that defined how it was encrypted, how it was "keyed"--related to each other, my guess it would have to be related directly to some type of student ID number (SSN? If so, I'd beetch up a storm, not sure if that's legal to do), etc. Ripe, easy to attack if someone knew what they were doing. And there are plenty of people out there who KNOW how to hack systems like those.
Just my two cents.
Ohio, and many other states, have developed student ID systems in order to facilitate information sharing between K-12 and post-secondary levels. This did enable a good bit of aggregation separate from individual student identities. I know someone who was working on small project to identify clusters of risk factors that are predictive of students dropping out. Tends to be somewhat more helpful than just knowing that black students, boys and poor students each individually face a greater risk--particularly because nobody is going to change any of those things.

Back in my grant-writing days when I was reading a lot of other people's research, there was some fairly useful (in terms of asking for grant money) research looking at the paired impact of poverty with asthma on school success (pretty grim, as a matter of fact). Anyway, this kind of stuff is nigh onto impossible using individual reports for discrete data elements (as mentioned on the site). But, it does continue to be a balancing act between protection of individuals and other needs.

Mr. Yost just pointed out recently some of the downfalls of the student identifier system in the school attendance audit. Without a tie back to something solid (like SS#--currently prohibited by law), there is the risk and reality of duplication. Further, as the state is prohibited from tracking data by anything more personal than those numbers, audit functions are hampered.

“Don't trust the internet!”

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#40 Mar 9, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>

As a matter of fact, digital data did become a factor in my divorce. I won't spill details here, suffice it to say, it was obtained and used in my case against the ex--there was some removal of 401K funds--spouses are required to co-sign removals and some other nonsense.
Yes--another factor ties to law enforcement.

Some of the non-disclosed information in the Trayvon Martin case has been some pretty detailed stuff that was apparently obtained from his phone. Presumably pretty detailed because it required several different agencies to first "unlock" and then to interpret. Speculation is that this was GPS data that can show fairly specifically the path Martin followed (and ultimately whether it matches what Zimmerman claims).

I'm pretty definitely creeped out when I think long and hard about the extent to which others may have knowledge about me (ever had to confirm your identity by answering multiple choice questions about where you lived in such and such a year?--info is coming from driver's license infor, but it creeped me out the first time it happened).

On the other hand, I have a couple of tangential connections to a guy up in Michigan who disappeared not long ago. Car and wallet found in Missouri or somewhere. Lot of baffled folks (including family) were certainly welcome some GPS info if it were available from car or phone.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#41 Mar 9, 2013
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes--another factor ties to law enforcement.
Some of the non-disclosed information in the Trayvon Martin case has been some pretty detailed stuff that was apparently obtained from his phone. Presumably pretty detailed because it required several different agencies to first "unlock" and then to interpret. Speculation is that this was GPS data that can show fairly specifically the path Martin followed (and ultimately whether it matches what Zimmerman claims).
This is a far, far cry from discussing aggregated data for federal or student purposes. GPS data sent to an individually held device is not protected data as far as I know. And it can be, my understanding, confiscated as evidence in a criminal case, same as text messages, voice messages, phone call logs, etc.
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm pretty definitely creeped out when I think long and hard about the extent to which others may have knowledge about me (ever had to confirm your identity by answering multiple choice questions about where you lived in such and such a year?--info is coming from driver's license infor, but it creeped me out the first time it happened).
I'm not sure where you're heading what you are alluding to by confirming your identity on line. I've renewed my vehicle registration online for years, of course they verify me via my registration number and a few other things. When creating specific accounts, ie a bank account online or other account which requires encrypted access, probably would use something such as PII -- a driver's license number, your full name, SSN, etc. Of course, you're going to have to identify yourself digitally when logging in. Check for the encryption signal in the browser's URL to ensure it is encrypted. Don't know about you, but all my banks have gone digital, investment accounts, credit cards, etc. I can't even log into my credit union checking account without verifying who I am each and every time. Most give me some kind of perk for doing so -- credit union gives me a few points towards my annual "owner's payment" (a reward for all the types of accounts I have there), my credit card company shaves a small percentage off the interest rate for not sending me a paper bill, etc.

They do track the devices I log in with--even from my laptop, if I log in one time with Firefox and the next with Chrome, it detects a difference and asks me to verify via a code sent via email or text. I am not creeped out at all by this. Other accounts, such as Topix are insecure and only ask for a cheesy password, not even a secured password. Why one ought to be smart and not use an email connected with anything important to you.
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
On the other hand, I have a couple of tangential connections to a guy up in Michigan who disappeared not long ago. Car and wallet found in Missouri or somewhere. Lot of baffled folks (including family) were certainly welcome some GPS info if it were available from car or phone.
Exactly.

As for indexing each source individual, that's not a problem. Most databases can generate a primary key and and that primary key is never duplicated, even when the database record is permanently deleted. There is plenty of intelligence there. The only possible problem I see there is one of human error, where the same individual is entered twice, given two separate index numbers. Data massaging is more the issue in my eye when it comes to aggregating data like public school performance information or even profit data. Human greed or lying to cover up institutional problems creeps in.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Columbus Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Worst Looters are REPUBLICANS running our Gover... 4 min White Fangs 56
When Will Men Come Forward? 16 min White Fangs 1
Impeach Trump ! 17 min pickle rick 8
BO Arrested for Treason 19 min Pope Che Reagan C... 263
Tick Tock arrives just in time for Thanksgiving 19 min Pope Che Reagan C... 73
Afterall, Trump LOST the POPULAR VOTE BY MILLIO... 43 min Reality Speaks 35
Four More Complaints On Bill Clinton 1 hr Duke for Mayor 6

Columbus Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Columbus Mortgages