The Feds' Invasive Student Tracking Database

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“animis opibusque parati”

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#1
Mar 8, 2013
 
http://tinyurl.com/a2c5q79

Rotten to the Core: The Feds' Invasive Student Tracking Database

by Michelle Malkin

(This is the fourth installment of a continuing series on nationalized academic standards known as the "Common Core.")

While many Americans worry about government drones in the sky spying on our private lives, Washington meddlers are already on the ground and in our schools gathering intimate data on children and families.

Say goodbye to your children's privacy. Say hello to an unprecedented nationwide student tracking system, whose data will apparently be sold by government officials to the highest bidders. It's yet another encroachment of centralized education bureaucrats on local control and parental rights under the banner of "Common Core."

As the American Principles Project, a conservative education think tank, reported last year, Common Core's technological project is "merely one part of a much broader plan by the federal government to track individuals from birth through their participation in the workforce." The 2009 porkulus package included a "State Fiscal Stabilization Fund" to bribe states into constructing "longitudinal data systems (LDS) to collect data on public-school students."

These systems will aggregate massive amounts of personal data -- health-care histories, income information, religious affiliations, voting status and even blood types and homework completion. The data will be available to a wide variety of public agencies. And despite federal student-privacy protections guaranteed by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, the Obama administration is paving the way for private entities to buy their way into the data boondoggle. Even more alarming, the U.S. Department of Education is encouraging a radical push from aggregate-level data-gathering to invasive individual student-level data collection.

At the South by Southwest education conference in Austin, Texas, this week, education technology gurus were salivating at the prospects of information plunder. "This is going to be a huge win for us," Jeffrey Olen, a product manager at education software company CompassLearning, told Reuters. Cha-ching-ching-ching.

The company is already aggressively marketing curricular material "aligned" to fuzzy, dumbed-down Common Core math and reading guidelines (which more than a dozen states are now revolting against). Along with two dozen other tech firms, CompassLearning sees even greater financial opportunities to mine Common Core student tracking systems. The centralized database is a strange-bedfellows alliance between the liberal Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (which largely underwrote and promoted the Common Core curricular scheme) and a division of conservative Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.(which built the database infrastructure).

Another nonprofit startup, "inBloom, Inc.," has evolved out of that partnership to operate the database. The Gates Foundation and other partners provided $100 million in seed money. Reuters reports that inBloom, Inc. will "likely start to charge fees in 2015" to states and school districts participating in the system. "So far, seven states -- Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, North Carolina and Massachusetts -- have committed to enter data from select school districts. Louisiana and New York will be entering nearly all student records statewide."

The National Education Data Model, available online at http://nces. sifinfo.org/datamodel/eiebrowser/techview.asp... , lists hundreds of data points considered indispensable to the nationalized student tracking racket. These include:

--"Bus Stop Arrival Time" and "Bus Stop Description."
--"Dwelling arrangement."
--"Diseases, Illnesses and Other Health Conditions."
--"Religious Affiliation."
--"Telephone Number Type" and "Telephone Status."

Home-schoolers and religious families that reject traditional government education would be tracked....

“animis opibusque parati”

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#2
Mar 8, 2013
 
Related priorities...or not:

http://tinyurl.com/c7eyyzz

via CBS

Officials: 80% of Recent NYC High School Graduates Cannot Read

“animis opibusque parati”

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#3
Mar 8, 2013
 

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Reading? Basic academic skills? Pshaw...
But sex ed in kindergarten is crucial.

OMG.
Che Reagan Christ

Medina, OH

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#4
Mar 8, 2013
 

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-tip- wrote:
Related priorities...or not:
http://tinyurl.com/c7eyyzz
via CBS
Officials: 80% of Recent NYC High School Graduates Cannot Read
I think whoever wrote the headline is the one who can't read.

From the article:

"Officials told CBS 2′s Kramer that nearly 80 percent of those who graduate from city high schools arrived at City University’s community college system without having mastered the skills to do college-level work."

Needing remedial classes to do college-level work is a far cry from not being able to read.

“animis opibusque parati”

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#5
Mar 8, 2013
 
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
I think whoever wrote the headline is the one who can't read.
From the article:
"Officials told CBS 2&#8242;s Kramer that nearly 80 percent of those who graduate from city high schools arrived at City University’s community college system without having mastered the skills to do college-level work."
Needing remedial classes to do college-level work is a far cry from not being able to read.
FTA: "They had to re-learn basic skills — reading, writing and math — first before they could begin college courses."
Che Reagan Christ

Medina, OH

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#6
Mar 8, 2013
 

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-tip- wrote:
<quoted text>
FTA: "They had to re-learn basic skills — reading, writing and math — first before they could begin college courses."
Right. 80% had to work on basic skills, reading, writing and math.

If writing and math are included in the skills that 80% of the students needed to work on, it would seem a fair bet that less than 80% "couldn't read," which was the assertion in the headline.

“animis opibusque parati”

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#7
Mar 8, 2013
 
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
Right. 80% had to work on basic skills, reading, writing and math.
If writing and math are included in the skills that 80% of the students needed to work on, it would seem a fair bet that less than 80% "couldn't read," which was the assertion in the headline.
The exact wording was "re-learn" -- not "had to work on."

Face it -- 80% of these public school students are being passed through the ranks and on to graduation without meeting basic grade requirements over the years.

No recent graduate should have to "re-learn" reading, writing, or math.
These results prove that NYC public schools are an abject failure.

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#8
Mar 8, 2013
 
More public school nonsense.
Anything but education.

http://tinyurl.com/beo3gel

A Michigan elementary school is defending its decision to confiscate a third-graders batch of homemade cupcakes because the birthday treats were decorated with plastic green Army soldiers....
Che Reagan Christ

Medina, OH

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#9
Mar 8, 2013
 

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-tip- wrote:
<quoted text>
The exact wording was "re-learn" -- not "had to work on."
Face it -- 80% of these public school students are being passed through the ranks and on to graduation without meeting basic grade requirements over the years.
No recent graduate should have to "re-learn" reading, writing, or math.
These results prove that NYC public schools are an abject failure.
I'm not arguing with you. All I am pointing out is that the headline asserting that 80% of the graduates can't read is not correct. Geez.

“Don't trust the internet!”

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#11
Mar 8, 2013
 
-tip- wrote:
<quoted text>
The exact wording was "re-learn" -- not "had to work on."
Face it -- 80% of these public school students are being passed through the ranks and on to graduation without meeting basic grade requirements over the years.
No recent graduate should have to "re-learn" reading, writing, or math.
These results prove that NYC public schools are an abject failure.
In fact, the results are terribly good for most systems.

However, Che is right. There is a broad range of possibilities between "cannot read" and "cannot read well enough to handle college level work." And for the record, reading is less of a problem than mathematic--so we can pretty well understand that the assumption of 80% even having some reading deficiencies is overblown.

As for "re-learning," I would lay that one at the feet of whatever semi-literate reporter wrote the article. Students did not learn to read and then forget (necessitating that the "re-learn").

“Don't trust the internet!”

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#12
Mar 8, 2013
 
^^results are NOT terribly good^^

“Don't trust the internet!”

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#13
Mar 8, 2013
 

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Michelle Malkin and her ilk (been waiting for an opportunity to use that word) just love to blow molehills into mountains. Particularly if they can point to said molehill as being evidence of some dastardly government plot to end the world as they think that they know it.

The article makes reference to data "aggregating" and then lists all of the private information these alleged systems are going to collect and then sell, to ... someone. And OUR SCHOOLS will be the collectors of it all. Let me just point out that it is not possible to "aggregate" data that is not being collected somewhere. I would also point out that almost every bit of data listed there is NOT currently being collected, and certainly not by the public schools, and some will never BE collected by the public schools, barring some Constitutional changes.

Anyone remember filling out the public school form that ask about your kid's religion? Now, despite the cries of folks who seem to think that a little (or a lot of) Christianity in our public schools never hurt anyone--and who even think that the biggest problem facing the US today is that nobody recites the Lord's Prayer in public schools anymore--schools cannot collect that information. It's not their business.

Pretty much the same issue when it comes to voting status.

Health info may be a bit iffier--as a practical matter it's a good idea to share that stuff for emergencies. But, those kinds of forms have long had waivers for people with conscientious objections to it.

Schools only have one real source for income information. Free and reduced-lunch applications have provided a proxy for poverty information to them for a long time. Nobody is required to participate, however.

But, let's think of some reasons why longitudinal data systems have value. It's not because the information is being sold to vendors (possible exception--those folks who for generations have cornered the market on class rings, senior pictures, graduation announcements and the like). It's because it is helpful to be able to track things like how well kids from various schools do once they hit college, and whether they are employable on college graduation. Things like whether the impact of Head Start lasts beyond kindergarten.

From a statistician's perspective, the more data the better. However, privacy is a real need, and so such enthusiasm must be tempered. But we cannot do so in the midst of hysterical voices making much ado over nothing.

“Don't trust the internet!”

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#14
Mar 8, 2013
 

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-tip- wrote:
More public school nonsense.
Anything but education.
http://tinyurl.com/beo3gel
A Michigan elementary school is defending its decision to confiscate a third-graders batch of homemade cupcakes because the birthday treats were decorated with plastic green Army soldiers....
Judgement call. They didn't confiscate the cupcakes--they just removed the soldiers and sent them back home.

FTA:

Principal Susan Wright released a statement to local media defending the decision.

“These are toys that were commonplace in the past,” she wrote.“However, some parents prohibit all guns as toys. In light of that difference, the school offered to replace the soldiers with another item and the soldiers were returned home with the student.”

“Living in a democratic society entails respect for opposing opinions,” she stated.“In the climate of recent events in schools we walk a delicate balance in teaching non-violence in our buildings and trying to ensure a safe, peaceful atmosphere.”

Since: Dec 11

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#15
Mar 8, 2013
 
So no big deal. The morons need something they didn't get or retain in school. Your argueing what? They CAN read but just not enough to do the college work? Who the flip cares how many fairies can dance on the head of a pin? Your correct that the words are different but they make the same point. I don't understand your energy pointing this out when it doesn't substantively change the assertion? And then to jab at the poor "dumbed down" reporter? Have a heart, they are just a victim of the same stellar modern day eductional system. I actually do agree with the topic stated that the Fed's are invasive. Haven't you caught on to this fact yet or do you just like the invasion when it's hoists the progressive flag?

“animis opibusque parati”

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#16
Mar 8, 2013
 
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
In fact, the results are terribly good for most systems.
However, Che is right. There is a broad range of possibilities between "cannot read" and "cannot read well enough to handle college level work." And for the record, reading is less of a problem than mathematic--so we can pretty well understand that the assumption of 80% even having some reading deficiencies is overblown.
As for "re-learning," I would lay that one at the feet of whatever semi-literate reporter wrote the article. Students did not learn to read and then forget (necessitating that the "re-learn").
Public schools are graduating students who haven't earned and are not entitled to their diplomas.

The End.

“animis opibusque parati”

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#17
Mar 8, 2013
 
FKA Reader wrote:
Michelle Malkin and her ilk (been waiting for an opportunity to use that word) just love to blow molehills into mountains. Particularly if they can point to said molehill as being evidence of some dastardly government plot to end the world as they think that they know it.
The article makes reference to data "aggregating" and then lists all of the private information these alleged systems are going to collect and then sell, to ... someone. And OUR SCHOOLS will be the collectors of it all. Let me just point out that it is not possible to "aggregate" data that is not being collected somewhere. I would also point out that almost every bit of data listed there is NOT currently being collected, and certainly not by the public schools, and some will never BE collected by the public schools, barring some Constitutional changes.
Anyone remember filling out the public school form that ask about your kid's religion? Now, despite the cries of folks who seem to think that a little (or a lot of) Christianity in our public schools never hurt anyone--and who even think that the biggest problem facing the US today is that nobody recites the Lord's Prayer in public schools anymore--schools cannot collect that information. It's not their business.
Pretty much the same issue when it comes to voting status.
Health info may be a bit iffier--as a practical matter it's a good idea to share that stuff for emergencies. But, those kinds of forms have long had waivers for people with conscientious objections to it.
Schools only have one real source for income information. Free and reduced-lunch applications have provided a proxy for poverty information to them for a long time. Nobody is required to participate, however.
But, let's think of some reasons why longitudinal data systems have value. It's not because the information is being sold to vendors (possible exception--those folks who for generations have cornered the market on class rings, senior pictures, graduation announcements and the like). It's because it is helpful to be able to track things like how well kids from various schools do once they hit college, and whether they are employable on college graduation. Things like whether the impact of Head Start lasts beyond kindergarten.
From a statistician's perspective, the more data the better. However, privacy is a real need, and so such enthusiasm must be tempered. But we cannot do so in the midst of hysterical voices making much ado over nothing.
Apparently, you are unable to follow the provided links:

http://nces.sifinfo.org/datamodel/eiebrowser/...

At the bottom of the page, you will find exactly 29 "religious affiliation" codes, there amongst a plethora of personal information to be collected for each student.

“animis opibusque parati”

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#18
Mar 8, 2013
 

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FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
Judgement call. They didn't confiscate the cupcakes--they just removed the soldiers and sent them back home.
FTA:
Principal Susan Wright released a statement to local media defending the decision.
“These are toys that were commonplace in the past,” she wrote.“However, some parents prohibit all guns as toys. In light of that difference, the school offered to replace the soldiers with another item and the soldiers were returned home with the student.”
“Living in a democratic society entails respect for opposing opinions,” she stated.“In the climate of recent events in schools we walk a delicate balance in teaching non-violence in our buildings and trying to ensure a safe, peaceful atmosphere.”
Well, I'm sure you're hoping the government bans the movie "Toy Story" as well.

Baa-baa, little sheep.

“Don't trust the internet!”

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#19
Mar 8, 2013
 

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-tip- wrote:
<quoted text>
Apparently, you are unable to follow the provided links:
http://nces.sifinfo.org/datamodel/eiebrowser/...
At the bottom of the page, you will find exactly 29 "religious affiliation" codes, there amongst a plethora of personal information to be collected for each student.
OK, tip, I clicked your link. Now, since you are the expert, perhaps you could tell me what I am looking at.

Because I don't see the federal tie.

So far as I can tell, this enterprise system is looking for customers and they have a wide range of data that they can track. That is a far cry from anyone mandating anything.

There are schools (like religiously oriented schools, for instance) who do compile religious data. And might want to share it with other similar orgs.

But, please, explain what you are seeing there that I missed.

“Queen of my domain”

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#20
Mar 8, 2013
 
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
OK, tip, I clicked your link. Now, since you are the expert, perhaps you could tell me what I am looking at.
Because I don't see the federal tie.
So far as I can tell, this enterprise system is looking for customers and they have a wide range of data that they can track. That is a far cry from anyone mandating anything.
There are schools (like religiously oriented schools, for instance) who do compile religious data. And might want to share it with other similar orgs.
But, please, explain what you are seeing there that I missed.
Ctrl+F to find the text "religious affiliation" if you can't find such link.

Read? I found it, no problem, first try.

“animis opibusque parati”

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#21
Mar 8, 2013
 
FKA Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
OK, tip, I clicked your link. Now, since you are the expert, perhaps you could tell me what I am looking at.
Because I don't see the federal tie.
So far as I can tell, this enterprise system is looking for customers and they have a wide range of data that they can track. That is a far cry from anyone mandating anything.
There are schools (like religiously oriented schools, for instance) who do compile religious data. And might want to share it with other similar orgs.
But, please, explain what you are seeing there that I missed.
No federal tie? LOL.

"...Incentivized by U.S. Department of Education grants, the systems are intended to enhance the ability of states to analyze education data, including individual records...

But state Republicans have criticized them as the precursor to a federal takeover of K-12 education since the Obama administration announced in 2009 that state's competing for Race to the Top grants would be scored, in part, on whether they adopted the common core.

"They started coming up with ways to reward states that played ball and sanction states that didn't, and that's where red flags just went up everywhere," Brewbaker said.

A keystone of President Obama's education agenda, the $4.35 billion Race to the Top contest is intended to spur innovation and reform in K-12 public education.

It scores state applicants based on whether they have implemented certain educational policies, including the common core and a statewide longitudinal tracking system...."

http://tinyurl.com/c5ymtek

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