Advocacy groups call hospitals, insur...

Advocacy groups call hospitals, insurers resistant to hearing from patients | The Columbus Dispatch

There are 6 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Jul 28, 2011, titled Advocacy groups call hospitals, insurers resistant to hearing from patients | The Columbus Dispatch. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

Anyone who has spent time navigating the health-care system probably can point out a thing or two that could be improved.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

community organizer

Powell, OH

#2 Jul 28, 2011
you get on it advocacy groups, and while you're out and around agitating and all keep an eye out for some grifts that I can use the keep my grifting self going.
hospital lifer

United States

#3 Jul 28, 2011
For example, hospitals will lose money if they have frequent readmissions, while those that keep patients healthy and out of the hospital will share in the money the government saves.

**
Um, do they realize this is a LOT harder than they think? People with chronic illness are often in and out of the hospital, sometimes within 24 hours, because they can deteriorate *fast*. And what does "frequent" mean? Sometimes I've been in a hospital every other month! So hospitals will lose money treating the patients that need them the most? Yet another reason this law is detrimental to those with chronic illness.
Sharon Columbus

Columbus, OH

#4 Jul 28, 2011
hospital lifer wrote:
For example, hospitals will lose money if they have frequent readmissions, while those that keep patients healthy and out of the hospital will share in the money the government saves.
**
Um, do they realize this is a LOT harder than they think? People with chronic illness are often in and out of the hospital, sometimes within 24 hours, because they can deteriorate *fast*. And what does "frequent" mean? Sometimes I've been in a hospital every other month! So hospitals will lose money treating the patients that need them the most? Yet another reason this law is detrimental to those with chronic illness.
I understand the "chronic" illnesses first hand! Let me pose a question: are you proactive doing as much as possible on a personal level to keep yourself healthy??? Eating properly, exercising if only a little to keep circulation going? If not there are resources for people with severe arthuritis, major circulation issues almost everyone's primary care has a list and/or phone number. Is the process simply/easy? Heck no; it takes hours of consultations, appointments & filling our paperwork. Worth it: 150% plus maybe a support group would help many if only one asks and seeks assistance. There are so many organizations, groups which offer FREE help. Doing zero definitely has no benefit but at least making the effort to try something is a plus.

I admit also the hospitals are overwhelmed with patients many without insurance and are fully aware of how the "system works" so hundreds of thousands use the ER as their primary care source. Consequently the hospitals are obligated to treat everyone but factor in the time it takes to handle a very minor medical issue versus heart, high blood pressure. So some are released once they have been stablized and maybe should be observed for 24 hours within the hospital setting. Here again poses a problem: no insurance coverage and lack of space available to accomodate everyone.
Hospital lifer

Columbus, OH

#5 Jul 28, 2011
Sharon Columbus wrote:
<quoted text>
I understand the "chronic" illnesses first hand! Let me pose a question: are you proactive doing as much as possible on a personal level to keep yourself healthy??? Eating properly, exercising if only a little to keep circulation going? If not there are resources for people with severe arthuritis, major circulation issues almost everyone's primary care has a list and/or phone number. Is the process simply/easy? Heck no; it takes hours of consultations, appointments & filling our paperwork. Worth it: 150% plus maybe a support group would help many if only one asks and seeks assistance. There are so many organizations, groups which offer FREE help. Doing zero definitely has no benefit but at least making the effort to try something is a plus.
I admit also the hospitals are overwhelmed with patients many without insurance and are fully aware of how the "system works" so hundreds of thousands use the ER as their primary care source. Consequently the hospitals are obligated to treat everyone but factor in the time it takes to handle a very minor medical issue versus heart, high blood pressure. So some are released once they have been stablized and maybe should be observed for 24 hours within the hospital setting. Here again poses a problem: no insurance coverage and lack of space available to accomodate everyone.
Well this isn't a problem for me currently, but it was when I had cystic fibrosis, a lung function of 23%, and needed a double lung transplant. When you're that sick, you are in and out of the hospital a LOT. I weighed 83 lbs. So, when you get to that point, "proactive" steps aren't possible. So what would the hospital have done? Not admitted me when I needed it?
Again, the point isn't the people who have one time admissions, or need continuing care for one event, like the woman in the story. I'm worried about people like me, who need constant medical supervision and care, and who are in and out of the hospital a lot.

Since: Jun 10

Canal Winchester, OH

#6 Jul 28, 2011
It looks like some institutions are upset at the low ratings recently received by Ohio medical institutions in Consumer Reports and US News & World Report.

I wonder if people were upset at getting unneeded and unproductive tests and procedures? I wonder if people were upset because medical providers would not provide advance information on standard out of pocket costs?

Medical providers have become distant expense centers and provide few real solutions for the value expected.

Perhaps Central Ohio Medical Providers need to get into the trenches with the rest of us - and experience reality?
Jeremy Engdahl-Johnson

Bainbridge Island, WA

#7 Jul 28, 2011
With disenchantment over the Medicare ACO concept growing, will commercial payor-driven ACOs gain momentum? http://www.healthcaretownhall.com/...

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