Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Can Live Full, Healthy Lives | WBNS-1...

Full story: 10TV WBNS 75
Aileen Wheaton visits Grant Medical Center every five weeks for an IV drug. It keeps her rheumatoid arthritis in check. Full Story
First Prev
of 4
Next Last
Bob

Grove City, OH

#1 Aug 2, 2010
Question...having a cousin who has Rheummatoid arthritis really bad, i'm curious as to how this doctor treats people with RA.
sensi with no sense

Groveport, OH

#2 Aug 2, 2010
As far as I know medication for arthritis patients has very often side effects that will affect the well being of them.

Is there a new medication out there on the market that has less side effects? I am curious about this.
sam

United States

#3 Aug 2, 2010
borrrrring story

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#4 Aug 3, 2010
Bob wrote:
Question...having a cousin who has Rheummatoid arthritis really bad, i'm curious as to how this doctor treats people with RA.
Today they use TNF-Blockers you self inject into your butt or thigh.(embrel, humiri, remicade) They often send RA into complete remission. They are expensive though since it's is a live agent ($900.00 a month)
CyberV

Columbus, OH

#5 Aug 3, 2010
I suffer from RA myself, so this didn't tell me anything I didn't already know.

Honestly, I would have liked more information on various treatments.
sam

United States

#6 Aug 3, 2010
anybody ever had the bubonic plague?
rce

Columbus, OH

#7 Aug 3, 2010
Instead of taking dangerous drugs (conventional medicine) find out why your immune system is attacking your joints(joint tissues). There is a reason why.
Jill RN

Columbus, OH

#8 Aug 3, 2010
Please do not present rheumatoid arthrits as a disease for the older population as reported by Andrea Cambern. This is a myth that needs to be dispelled. Per John Hopkins Arthritis Center "Although rheumatoid arthritis may present at any age, patients most commonly are first affected in the third to sixth decades." As a rheumatoid arthritis patient myself, I was finally diagnosed at 22 years old. I had been having pain and disability for two years prior. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease affecting the entire body, not just joints.
Jill RN

Columbus, OH

#9 Aug 3, 2010
sam wrote:
borrrrring story
Not to those of us who have RA.
Sigh

Columbus, OH

#10 Aug 3, 2010
rce wrote:
Instead of taking dangerous drugs (conventional medicine) find out why your immune system is attacking your joints(joint tissues). There is a reason why.
It's called heredity, but thanks for playing. The women in my family are all prone to auto-immune disorders-- Vitiligo, RA, Hypothyroid, Diabetes, Lupus, vasculitis. The sad thing is once you have one AI problem, you are prone to more. I myself have three, my sisters have 3 and 2. We all developed them in our 30's. It's not about some great unknown environmental aspect. It's a genetic defect. We have cousins and children who have some forms as well.
Also, I agree, this article had nothing new. Why not discuss the pros and cons of the various treatments? And how you sacrifice your immune system for the treatments that are the most effective. I saw a bumper sticker "RA is a PAIN!"
CyberV

Columbus, OH

#11 Aug 3, 2010
Yeah, I'm only 29, and I've been suffering with it for 2 years. It took them forever to diagnose me and find a treatment that worked. I've had it in both my feet, wrists, left shoulder, hands, and right knee.

It's excruciatingly painful. I'd compare the recent shoulder incident to having a spine made of antique porcelin. I couldn't bend over and I could barely move my arm. I was a prisoner of my own body.

Sam, do us all a favor and stay out of it if you have nothing useful to contribute. I certainly hope this article is followed up on soon, because if there ARE other treatments out there, I want to know so I can discuss them with my doctor.
CyberV

Columbus, OH

#12 Aug 3, 2010
rce wrote:
Instead of taking dangerous drugs (conventional medicine) find out why your immune system is attacking your joints(joint tissues). There is a reason why.
Actually, it's not easy to tell sometimes why people get this disease. It could be hereditary, or develop from an activity done for years. There's just no way to be certain.

No one in my family had RA, but I still got it.

And without those "dangerous drugs", I'd be in agony, deformed and crippled by now.
Katie

Columbus, OH

#13 Aug 3, 2010
My husband has RA and it's been a horrible journey until recently. He is only 32 and has gone through many treatments and is living a pretty “normal” life at this point. He has just recently discovered that he is in a drug-induced remission and is probably going to be on his treatments for the rest of his life. I would like to hear more about the long-term effects of these drugs they are using to treat him or if there is another alternative. In 20 years, how is being on chemo meds and Humira shots going to effect him in the long run?

On another note – this is an inherited disease. It appears that some people can carry the HLB27 gene yet are unaffected. So, just because you don’t know of someone in your family that had it, does not mean they did not carry the gene or that they still can’t get it. My husband’s mother is also HLB27 positive, but is unaffected by RA – at this point. Hope this helps.
Shannon

United States

#14 Aug 3, 2010
sensi with no sense wrote:
As far as I know medication for arthritis patients has very often side effects that will affect the well being of them.
Is there a new medication out there on the market that has less side effects? I am curious about this.
There is a juice called Mona Vie that has been around for about 5 years now. It is all natural fruit juices. The main fruit being Acai. It has done amazing things for me with my migraines and I personally know of people that drink it and it has helped with their RA. Please get in touch with me if you want more info. It will only take a minute of your time and I am sure it will be worth it. shannon09m@hotmail.com
Shannon

United States

#15 Aug 3, 2010
CyberV wrote:
Yeah, I'm only 29, and I've been suffering with it for 2 years. It took them forever to diagnose me and find a treatment that worked. I've had it in both my feet, wrists, left shoulder, hands, and right knee.
It's excruciatingly painful. I'd compare the recent shoulder incident to having a spine made of antique porcelin. I couldn't bend over and I could barely move my arm. I was a prisoner of my own body.
Sam, do us all a favor and stay out of it if you have nothing useful to contribute. I certainly hope this article is followed up on soon, because if there ARE other treatments out there, I want to know so I can discuss them with my doctor.
Please contact me. I have been on a fruit juice for a year now that helps with my migraines and I know of others that drink it for their RA. It is called Mona Vie. Email me if you want more info. shannon09m@hotmail.com
sensi with no sense

Groveport, OH

#16 Aug 4, 2010
rce wrote:
Instead of taking dangerous drugs (conventional medicine) find out why your immune system is attacking your joints(joint tissues). There is a reason why.
Yeah, the reason is you being a neighbor and RA patients being allergic to you?
sensi with no sense

Groveport, OH

#17 Aug 4, 2010
Katie wrote:
My husband has RA and it's been a horrible journey until recently. He is only 32 and has gone through many treatments and is living a pretty “normal” life at this point. He has just recently discovered that he is in a drug-induced remission and is probably going to be on his treatments for the rest of his life. I would like to hear more about the long-term effects of these drugs they are using to treat him or if there is another alternative. In 20 years, how is being on chemo meds and Humira shots going to effect him in the long run?
On another note – this is an inherited disease. It appears that some people can carry the HLB27 gene yet are unaffected. So, just because you don’t know of someone in your family that had it, does not mean they did not carry the gene or that they still can’t get it. My husband’s mother is also HLB27 positive, but is unaffected by RA – at this point. Hope this helps.
Thank you for giving more info about it.

I missed specific info in the article, i.e. what kind of (new?) drugs promises release and a better quality in life.
sensi with no sense

Groveport, OH

#18 Aug 4, 2010
Corticosteroids --- It's several years ago already, but some of our patients had to take this medicine and it caused negative side effects in several of them (like a cushingoid appearance).

Other patients complained about stomach ulcers that developed.

So, I am really interested to figure out if there is a new alternative to replace corticosteroids when DMARDS and NSAIDs don't show success in the treatment of the patients RA.

PS: Shannon gave a hint with a special juice, they may only help soft cases of people with RA IMO but not people really badly suffering from RA
sensi with no sense

Groveport, OH

#19 Aug 4, 2010
Sigh wrote:
<quoted text>
It's called heredity, but thanks for playing. The women in my family are all prone to auto-immune disorders-- Vitiligo, RA, Hypothyroid, Diabetes, Lupus, vasculitis. The sad thing is once you have one AI problem, you are prone to more. I myself have three, my sisters have 3 and 2. We all developed them in our 30's. It's not about some great unknown environmental aspect. It's a genetic defect. We have cousins and children who have some forms as well.
Also, I agree, this article had nothing new. Why not discuss the pros and cons of the various treatments? And how you sacrifice your immune system for the treatments that are the most effective. I saw a bumper sticker "RA is a PAIN!"
mild form of ra here (really mild, no treatment necessary), also ulcerative colitis and in younger years a mild thoracic necrosis of the spine --- also 3 here

Yes, you are 100% right!

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#21 Aug 14, 2010
When I got out of basic training 30 years ago I had a one night fling with a female GI. She gave me a chromosome marker and I developed reiter's syndrome, it has been ravaging my body ever since - I don't even think I finished (came).

The last thing you want is a rare disease in middle America because doctors are absolute idiots - they get through school on mnemonics.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 4
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Columbus Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Every state has ISIS recruits 2 hr They cannot kill ... 126
Is Barack Obama Doing a Good Job as President? (Aug '13) 2 hr Born in Kenya Ind... 5,783
Austria passes laws to regulate Islam Muslims 2 hr Born in Kenya Ind... 22
Is Barack Obama a Muslim? 71% Say Yes (May '14) 2 hr Born in Kenya Ind... 374
Heavy Snowfall To Finish The Weekend 5 hr Duke for Mayor 12
Xenos Christian Fellowship is a CULT! (Jul '12) 6 hr Duke for Mayor 1,087
What ails the black family? Hard realities! 6 hr Duke for Mayor 78
America needs Jesus Christ and the Word of God 7 hr Duke for Mayor 40
What ails the White Family? Hard Realities! 7 hr Devil Kyle Obama ... 23
Columbus Dating
Find my Match
More from around the web

Columbus People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 4:05 pm PST

Yahoo! Sports 4:05PM
Browns agree to terms with QB McCown
CBS Sports 4:56 PM
QB Josh McCown agrees to terms with the Browns: Three things to know
Bleacher Report 5:19 PM
McCown Signing Doesn't Improve Brutal QB Situation
NFL 8:50 AM
Josh McCown: I want to help Manziel as much as I can
CBS Sports 2:08 PM
Josh McCown signing with Browns puts Bills in tough spot at QB