Adults with ADHD struggle to fit in, ...

Adults with ADHD struggle to fit in, function

There are 113 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Feb 10, 2011, titled Adults with ADHD struggle to fit in, function. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

Mental-health therapist Rob Eldridge, second from left, runs an attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder support group for adults.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

i wish

Newell, PA

#21 Feb 10, 2011
My dad had alzheimers, and I often wonder if the ADHD medicines would have helped him. He had no other health problems.
HumanSpirit

Nicholasville, KY

#22 Feb 10, 2011
There has been "No" biological defect found for any mental illness or any of the other made to order diagnoses by any neurological study.

Without a test for chemical imbalance the mental health (psychiatry) is limited in the ancillary tests of medicine like an EKG, EEG, blood work or other tests in the diagnoses of a patient. They aren't needed in Psychiatry.

The psychiatric diagnosis is made on the basis of behavior and hearsay.

If we respect metabolic changes based on daily dietary habits, weight gain / loss , terms of the survival of the organisms as a person age along with physical conditioning, physical illness, electrolyte level, gender differences , body temperature, I don't see how the Mental Health and Counseling Industry could conform to any consistency in data with consideration to the above to state a person has a mental disease or illness based on chemical imbalance.

APA lies to the American Public and puts the society in danger

http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp...
HumanSpirit

Nicholasville, KY

#23 Feb 10, 2011
There Are No "Chemical Imbalances"

Snip:

"The hypothetical disturbances of neurochemical function that are said to underlie "mental illness" are just that: hypothetical. No experiment has ever shown that anyone has an "imbalance" of any neurotransmitters or any other brain chemicals. Nor could any conceivable experiment demonstrate the existence of a "chemical imbalance," simply because no one, least of all the biopsychiatrists, has the slightest idea what a proper and healthy chemical "balance" would look like."

"...the views and beliefs of biopsychiatry have nothing to do with the answers to scientific questions in any case: the hunt for biological "causes" of "mental illness" is an entirely fallacious enterprise in the first place; the non- existence of data to support its assertions is quite beside the point."

"The latest edition of one pharmacology text has this to say about the status of depression as a disease: "Despite extensive efforts, attempts to document the metabolic changes in human subjects predicted by these [biological] hypotheses have not, on balance, provided consistent or compelling corroboration." This is a long-winded way of admitting that not even a scrap of evidence supports the idea that depression results from a "chemical imbalance." Yet patients are told every day - by their doctors, by the media, and by drug company advertising - that it is a proven scientific fact that depression has a known biochemical origin. It follows directly that millions of Americans are being lied to by their doctors; and people surely can't give informed consent for drug treatment when what they're being "informed" by is a fraud.... To sum up: there is no evidence whatsoever to support the view that "mental illness" is biochemical in origin; in other words, things like "Unipolar Disorder" and "Attention Deficit Disorder" simply do not exist."

http://www.adhd-report.com/biopsychiatry/bio_...
HumanSpirit

Nicholasville, KY

#24 Feb 10, 2011
Violence, Deaths Murders and Suicides from mind drugs.

SSRI stories

http://ssristories.com/index.php

----------

Psychiatry "No Science"



----------

Psychiatry: An Industry of Death, Introduction

http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Chris

Columbus, OH

#25 Feb 10, 2011
Huh wrote:
"I'm so focused on an idea that I don't want to say hi to someone I pass in the hallway and forget it," he said. "But I don't want to seem rude."
This sentence in the article did not make sense. How is a person who is "so focused on an idea" considered ADHD? Sounds more like maybe OCD.
As an adult with ADHD, I can tell you hyperfocus is very real. If a subject, task, or other activity interest you, you can focus on only THAT thing, and delve into minute details and block out nearly everything else around you. To others it seems like you're staring off into space and not aware of your surroundings, but in reality your mind is going a mile a minute. What seems like a few minutes to you can actually be over an hour of clock time. That's why we need to have these organizational support systems like task lists and daily schedules. It is so easy to get preoccupied and forget unless it's not written down. It is not easy to mentally shift gears and switch tasks.

This hyperfocus can benefit adults with ADHD because when you find a subject interesting, you want to learn everything about it and become an expert at it. Unfortunately, this often comes at the expense of daily life and social interaction as what appears to have happened to the engineer in the article.

It is definitely NOT OCD as my wife can attest! Being organized is so difficult that I have to work twice as hard on it as normal people do.
Sterling Silver

Columbus, OH

#26 Feb 10, 2011
Linda wrote:
Yea, but the question is: Can I get Social Security Disablity, so I can sit at home on my butt all day and get money from the benevolent taxpayer?
It's fun being a bitter person, isn't it?
Whatever

Southfield, MI

#27 Feb 10, 2011
Michael wrote:
<quoted text> people with ADHD have trouble focusing on multiple things so thinkinh hard about one thing is normal for them and if something gets in the way like they guy he doesnt want to say hi to he'll start thinking about that and forget about his primary task
Ohhhhhkay buddy, whatever you say.
HumanSpirit

Nicholasville, KY

#28 Feb 10, 2011
The antidepressants known as serotonin reuptake inhibitors have a significant effect on emotional experience and behavior, even in the absence of clinical depression. While serotonergic interventions are known to reduce hostility and violence in psychiatric patients, little is known about the effect of such treatment in normal individuals.

American Journal of Psychiatry March, 1998;155:373-379
Bubbles

United States

#29 Feb 10, 2011
ADHD isn't real. It's just stupid people.
Look in the Mirror

Southfield, MI

#30 Feb 10, 2011
Michael wrote:
<quoted text> shut the hell up an actually post something worth reading
Maybe you should take your own advice!
adhd parent

United States

#31 Feb 10, 2011
ADHD people also sometimes have something called hyper focus. This is when they can become so focused that they loose track of whats going on around them. This makes multi tasking difficult.
HumanSpirit

Nicholasville, KY

#32 Feb 10, 2011
Beware those pushing ADHD drugs

GRETCHEN B. LEFEVER
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va.

WHEN THE PORTSMOUTH School Board in southeastern Virginia sent a flier home to parents warning them about the epidemic of children misdiagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and prescribed unnecessary psychiatric drugs, six national and eight local organizations responded in protest, according to an Oct. 19 story in The Virginian-Pilot.
But the Oct. 27 follow-up story indicated that the board chair received hundreds of mostly favorable e-mails.
The board deserves to be commended for sounding an alarm. Published research (e.g., http://www.srmhp.org/0201/adhd.html ) has documented that ADHD treatment among children in Portsmouth exceeds all national estimates and guidelines. Up to 14 percent of the region’s elementary-school children (27 percent of black boys and 33 percent of white boys) have been diagnosed with ADHD.
Improper ADHD care is a national concern. Because basic questions about ADHD are controversial, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened an expert panel of unbiased scientists to review ADHD research. The 1998 panel concluded that there was strong evidence that the disorder probably does exist, but that it affects only 3-5 percent of children. It also concluded that there are serious problems with how ADHD is diagnosed. According to a pediatric NIH panel member Mark Vonnegut, M.D.(son of the late Kurt Vonnegut, the writer),“The diagnosis of ADHD is a mess.”
More recently, national research has documented that less than one-third of primary-care physicians adhere to established diagnostic criteria. As previously reported in The Virginian-Pilot, two-thirds of pediatric providers in southeastern Virginia acknowledged that children in the area do not receive adequate diagnostic evaluations. Nationally, rates of treatment have increased, but not necessarily the number of disordered children.
According to the CDC, as of 2003, up to 14 percent of American boys had been diagnosed with ADHD, and treatment patterns varied considerably across states. The rate of ADHD diagnosis was 5 percent for California and 11 percent for Alabama. Treatment rates vary even more widely across communities. In 1999, for example, the relative rate of Ritalin use was 100 times greater in some U.S. cities than in others.
When a 2006 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee recommended use of “black-box warning” labels for ADHD drugs, prominent groups such as the American Academy of Pediatrics protested. Nonetheless, the FDA warning was upheld. Dr. Steven Nissen, cardiologist and FDA panel member, expressed worry that stimulant drugs are vastly overprescribed for ADHD and that the cardiovascular risks are under-appreciated. He also noted that he was not surprised by the reaction of pediatric groups:“It’s difficult to find physicians willing to stand up to industry.”
The FDA was able to withstand intense opposition. Will Portsmouth school administrators be able to resist pressure from the Tidewater chapter of Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD), the Virginia Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, and others who suggest distributing materials that advocate for more of the same standard (i.e., problematic) practices?
In any event, parents should be warned that professionals who argue that ADHD is under-medicated may be motivated by money tied to the industry or lucrative “ADHD” clinical practices.
Gretchen B. LeFever is a clinical psychologist and a professor of education at Regent University.

Pasted from http://www.projo.com/opinion/contributors/con...
no one

Columbus, OH

#33 Feb 10, 2011
Topper wrote:
It's all about getting "certified"....And having an official excuse for being an ****......
And here is a suprise...Kids who weren't made to behave, grow into adults who don't behave...[Oppps I mean "have social skills"]...
....And have kids they don't teach to behave...Etc Etc Etc.....
you are absolutely correct, but this is not what ADHD is about, but ADHD is not about misbehaving.......maybe you should study up
Chris

Columbus, OH

#34 Feb 10, 2011
Get a Clue wrote:
<quoted text>
This is not ADHD. Read up on it and get educated!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attention-defici...
Predominantly inattentive type symptoms may include:
Be easily distracted, miss details, forget things, and frequently switch from one activity to another
Have difficulty maintaining focus on one task
Become bored with a task after only a few minutes, unless doing something enjoyable
Have difficulty focusing attention on organizing and completing a task or learning something new or trouble completing or turning in homework assignments, often losing things (e.g., pencils, toys, assignments) needed to complete tasks or activities
Not seem to listen when spoken to
Daydream, become easily confused, and move slowly
Have difficulty processing information as quickly and accurately as others
Struggle to follow instructions.
Yes, my thoughts exactly. You should get a clue as well:
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/612.h...

"What you might not know about ADHD is that there's another side: the tendency for children and adults with attention deficit disorder to focus very intently on things that do interest them. At times, the focus is so strong that they become oblivious to the world around them.

For children, the object of "hyperfocus" might be playing a video game or watching TV. For adults, it might be shopping or surfing the Internet. But whatever holds the attention, the result is the same: Unless something or someone interrupts, hours drift by as important tasks and relationships fall by the wayside."
Bubbles

United States

#35 Feb 10, 2011
Chris wrote:
<quoted text>
As an adult with ADHD, I can tell you hyperfocus is very real. If a subject, task, or other activity interest you, you can focus on only THAT thing, and delve into minute details and block out nearly everything else around you. To others it seems like you're staring off into space and not aware of your surroundings, but in reality your mind is going a mile a minute. What seems like a few minutes to you can actually be over an hour of clock time. That's why we need to have these organizational support systems like task lists and daily schedules. It is so easy to get preoccupied and forget unless it's not written down. It is not easy to mentally shift gears and switch tasks.
This hyperfocus can benefit adults with ADHD because when you find a subject interesting, you want to learn everything about it and become an expert at it. Unfortunately, this often comes at the expense of daily life and social interaction as what appears to have happened to the engineer in the article.
It is definitely NOT OCD as my wife can attest! Being organized is so difficult that I have to work twice as hard on it as normal people do.
==========

Der der der!
HumanSpirit

Nicholasville, KY

#36 Feb 10, 2011
Psychiatrists Label And Drug Children Solely For Profit

There are no genetic tests, no brain scans, blood tests, chemical imbalance tests or X-rays that can scientifically/medically prove that any psychiatric disorder is a medical condition.

Pasted from < http://www.topix.com/med/psychiatry/2011/01/p... ;
justmyopinion

Mount Gilead, OH

#38 Feb 10, 2011
Don't go by what I say but...I think it's mostly a load of crap! When I was is in school not a single kid was "ADHD". There was one single student in the whole school who was known to be "hyperactive". The teachers kept an eye on him and I never heard of any problems. Now it seems at least half the kids and their parents are on prescription drugs for something. WAKE UP, it's about profit for the big drug companies! On an unrelated side note, who the hell ever heard of peanut allergies? Not a single kid in my school was allergic to peanut butter, we all ate it! Now some schools treat peanut butter like toxic waste banning it from cafeterias, what a joke! As one old person said "I never heard of so many people having diseases".
How about this: Cut the caffeine, get some damn sleep, eat right, and use a little self discipline!
Michael

Newark, OH

#39 Feb 10, 2011
Whatever wrote:
<quoted text>
Ohhhhhkay buddy, whatever you say.
read up on it before you start running your mouth
HumanSpirit

Nicholasville, KY

#40 Feb 10, 2011
Child psychiatry is sick with hidden conflicts of interest
http://www.nydailynews.com/opinions/2008/12/1...

Child psychiatry is sick with hidden conflicts of interest
By Dr. Leonard Sax

Sunday, December 14th 2008, 4:00 AM

When I first began writing prescriptions for children 22 years ago, it was unusual for a child to be taking powerful psychiatric drugs. Today it's common. How did we get here?

Dr. Joseph Biederman is part of the answer. He's an important guy. His title is "chief of pediatric psychopharmacology" at Massachusetts General Hospital, the main teaching hospital for Harvard Medical School. Pediatricians and family doctors look to him, and doctors like him, for guidance about what they should do with problem kids. For the past two decades, Biederman has pushed the use of medications for treating ADHD and bipolar disorder. Over the past two decades, the use of medications for treating those disorders has soared.

Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa), recognizing how much influence Biederman has in promoting these medications for children, wondered whether the doctor might be taking money from drug companies. When first asked, Biederman admitted to taking perhaps "a couple hundred thousand dollars" from pharmaceutical companies. When he was asked to take another look, it turned out that Biederman and a colleague had accepted more than $1.6 million from the drug companies. And they hadn't told anybody.

Or consider the case of Dr. Fred Goodwin. After stepping down as director of the National Institute for Mental Health, Goodwin moved on to serve as the host of the NPR program "The Infinite Mind." Goodwin didn't think he needed to tell anybody that the drug companies were paying him $1.3 million, even as he reassured listeners on his program about the safety of powerful psychiatric medications for children. Last month, after his connections to the drug industry came to light, NPR canceled his program.

http://www.nydailynews.com/opinions/2008/12/1...
HumanSpirit

Nicholasville, KY

#41 Feb 10, 2011
US Kids Represent Psychiatric Drug Goldmine

Pasted from < http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL0912/S00122.... ;

Prescriptions for psychiatric drugs increased 50 percent with children in the US, and 73 percent among adults, from 1996 to 2006, according to a study in the May/June 2009 issue of the journal Health Affairs. Another study in the same issue of Health Affairs found spending for mental health care grew more than 30 percent over the same ten-year period, with almost all of the increase due to psychiatric drug costs.

Pasted from < http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL0912/S00122.... ;

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Columbus Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Donald Trump Administration 7 min jonjedi 710
News Chevrolet Malibu Owners: Problems & Solutions (Jun '06) 41 min jonjedi 2,918
Disappearing threads 2 hr jonjedi 2
The Lost Art of Conversation 3 hr jonjedi 20
Breaking news....... 3 hr jonjedi 96
jonjedi 4 hr jonjedi 43
World Rankiings ? 4 hr jonjedi 3
Odds of Trump's impeachment 7 hr jonjedi 308

Columbus Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Columbus Mortgages