Things you do not know about me....

“The One! The Only! RUKiddingme”

Since: Dec 08

Jersey, Baby!

#130 May 4, 2014

“Baby, it's cold outside! ”

Since: Apr 10

BLOCKHEADS!

#131 May 4, 2014
RU_Kiddingme wrote:
Oh yes! She was coroner for years Thanks!
I was sad to see her retire.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#132 May 4, 2014
They cannot kill a Spook wrote:
<quoted text>
It probably got stunted from the freeze. If the new grouth from last year or so is still flexible or springy just let it go untill mid june. If this is a soft maple they are resilient. I have seen some cut by idiots along power lines down to just a trunk and a couple of big limb stubs and they sprout new branchs. Those trees will never be nice big trees but still give shade and a place for Blue Jays etc.
Do you have any Osage Orange trees ( hedge apple) around?
We have them here, Spook. In colonial times they used rows of them to separate the fields, so they are still around in abundance. I never see one standing alone. Every fall I pick up bags of the 'apples' and put in the garage, shed etc. They repel spiders and other bugs. Until they rot. They're also known as 'monkey balls' for some reason.
They cannot kill a Spook

Taylor, MI

#133 May 4, 2014
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
We have them here, Spook. In colonial times they used rows of them to separate the fields, so they are still around in abundance. I never see one standing alone. Every fall I pick up bags of the 'apples' and put in the garage, shed etc. They repel spiders and other bugs. Until they rot. They're also known as 'monkey balls' for some reason.
I am looking for seedlings . Every place I see them here people mow right up to them so there is no seedling.

Other thing I am looking for is Hawthorns.

“Baby, it's cold outside! ”

Since: Apr 10

BLOCKHEADS!

#134 May 4, 2014
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
We have them here, Spook. In colonial times they used rows of them to separate the fields, so they are still around in abundance. I never see one standing alone. Every fall I pick up bags of the 'apples' and put in the garage, shed etc. They repel spiders and other bugs. Until they rot. They're also known as 'monkey balls' for some reason.
The green Osage fruit(unedible) is great! I used to collect them ,slice them and dry them out in oven and used them in pinecones wreaths...I made them from all natural things.
They're really sticky also. I used to dry out the real monkey balls,that fell from my sycamore tree, and other stuff I would see. Also, dried all kinds of nuts, drilled a hole for the wire and put them in wreaths.
Them were the days......
They cannot kill a Spook

Taylor, MI

#135 May 4, 2014
BizzyBee wrote:
<quoted text>
The green Osage fruit(unedible) is great! I used to collect them ,slice them and dry them out in oven and used them in pinecones wreaths...I made them from all natural things.
They're really sticky also. I used to dry out the real monkey balls,that fell from my sycamore tree, and other stuff I would see. Also, dried all kinds of nuts, drilled a hole for the wire and put them in wreaths.
Them were the days......
Chinese Gooseberry (Kiwi) is what I have heard called monkey balls, and the lumps in Michelle Obama's pants.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#136 May 4, 2014
They cannot kill a Spook wrote:
Does the last place horse at the derby get turned into Belgian steaks?
Nope. Just a claimer. Unless the poor thing is in Japan. One of our debry winners, Ferdinand, was bought by an outfit in Japan to stand stud. After a few years without throwing a significant runner, he was sold to a slaughter house.

Horses win money racing, but the big money is in the breeding shed. That's why so many are retired from racing at 3 and 4, if they are full colts.

The derby winner yesterday is a small horse. Very happy for the connections.
Pale Rider

Liberty, KY

#137 May 4, 2014
They cannot kill a Spook wrote:
<quoted text>
It probably got stunted from the freeze. If the new grouth from last year or so is still flexible or springy just let it go untill mid june. If this is a soft maple they are resilient. I have seen some cut by idiots along power lines down to just a trunk and a couple of big limb stubs and they sprout new branchs. Those trees will never be nice big trees but still give shade and a place for Blue Jays etc.
Do you have any Osage Orange trees ( hedge apple) around?
Do you have any Osage Orange trees ( hedge apple) around?

Yes a few, but scattered, and not in abundance. I saw a cow once that had swallowed a hedge apple. A vet was called to dislodge it from her throat, using a hose to run down her throat.

How do you tell the difference in a male/female Blue Jay?

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#138 May 4, 2014
Pale Rider wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you have any Osage Orange trees ( hedge apple) around?
Yes a few, but scattered, and not in abundance. I saw a cow once that had swallowed a hedge apple. A vet was called to dislodge it from her throat, using a hose to run down her throat.
How do you tell the difference in a male/female Blue Jay?
Males always have the brighter color plumage. The females have to be duller colored to protect the babies. The body and head shape are identical. It's like that in most of the animal kindom, including fish.
Pale Rider

Liberty, KY

#139 May 4, 2014
Here is a little information on April freeze damage

Leaves on many trees and shrubs can be damaged by the low temperatures. Among those trees are colorado spruce, green ash, honeylocust, and hackberry. These three trees have leaves just beginning to emerge from the bud, which is the prime stage for freeze damage. Other trees and shrubs that leaf out earlier, such as crab apples, lilacs, linden, silver maple and Siberian elm, are not damaged, as their leaves are "older" and more hardy.

Was your tree damaged by a April freeze? If the young leaves are blackened, shriveled and dry as a bone, the answer is, yes. The answer also is yes if, during a present hot spell, leaves are dropping prematurely.

What will happen to freeze-affected trees? The answers vary. Freezing of new leaves will damage the trees slightly. It will set them back and possibly weaken them. Other effects depend on the health of the tree prior to a dramatic temperature change. Healthy trees are able to store three years worth of energy. If the tree was vigorous and healthy last year, it will put out a new set of leaves from what are called adventitious buds. This "secondary" growth often is weaker than the primary growth put out first, so expect to find small branchlet loss in high wind storms during the summer. The secondary growth also may come out in a bushy or tuft-like pattern called "witches brooming." The shape and form of these trees may look a little different for a couple of years. If the particular tree in question was declining prior to this temperature drop, expect to see further decline. Trees in this situation have less stored energy and may not recuperate as well as their counterparts. If a tree damaged by freeze has not re-leafed by June 1, it probably never will.

Homeowners can't do much to undo Mother Nature's blow. Prune out dead branches during summer and do not "baby" the trees with too much water. Overwatering in a heavy clay soil (which most of us have in abundance) will lead to oxygen starvation in the root system. The best rule of thumb for tree watering is: "deeply, less often". Your lawn will benefit from this watering rule of thumb, too. If the tree is watered with the lawn, try to accustom the lawn to receiving water less than every three days. Resist fertilizing until midsummer, but do it before July 30. Fertilization is not a must. Most trees in lawns receive enough.

Your best bet is to let those freeze-damaged trees recover on their own.
They cannot kill a Spook

Taylor, MI

#140 May 4, 2014
Pale Rider wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you have any Osage Orange trees ( hedge apple) around?
Yes a few, but scattered, and not in abundance. I saw a cow once that had swallowed a hedge apple. A vet was called to dislodge it from her throat, using a hose to run down her throat.
How do you tell the difference in a male/female Blue Jay?
Like Serious Lady said bright colors are male bird dull female on most birds. Turkey Vultures are the same but the female can projecttile vomit when she wants to defend her nest. And the ones I have seen and vomit about fifteen feet
They cannot kill a Spook

Taylor, MI

#141 May 4, 2014
Pale Rider wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you have any Osage Orange trees ( hedge apple) around?
Yes a few, but scattered, and not in abundance. I saw a cow once that had swallowed a hedge apple. A vet was called to dislodge it from her throat, using a hose to run down her throat.
How do you tell the difference in a male/female Blue Jay?
I wouldn't want to be that cow or that vet. That had to be misery.
Pale Rider

AOL

#142 May 4, 2014
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
Males always have the brighter color plumage. The females have to be duller colored to protect the babies. The body and head shape are identical. It's like that in most of the animal kindom, including fish.
I see some woodpeckers up close, those with the bright red on the head. The Male has red all the way down to nearly the beak. The Female has some gray between beak and the red. The Blue Jay, I can't really tell the difference, like the male/female Cardinal, they are examples like you are saying.

Interesting on the fish, I never knew that. Someone asked me, how I knew the difference in a Holstein cow? Each has its own different spots, and they each have their own little personality. Their reply was, they are all Black and White, and the Red and White Too.
Interesting subject, variety, nice.
Duke for Mayor

Akron, OH

#143 May 5, 2014
Pale Rider wrote:
<quoted text>
I see some woodpeckers up close, those with the bright red on the head. The Male has red all the way down to nearly the beak. The Female has some gray between beak and the red. The Blue Jay, I can't really tell the difference, like the male/female Cardinal, they are examples like you are saying.
Interesting on the fish, I never knew that. Someone asked me, how I knew the difference in a Holstein cow? Each has its own different spots, and they each have their own little personality. Their reply was, they are all Black and White, and the Red and White Too.
Interesting subject, variety, nice.
Male/female cardinals are quite different in appearance, the males being bright red and females dusky brownish/red.

woof

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#144 May 5, 2014
They cannot kill a Spook wrote:
<quoted text>
I wouldn't want to be that cow or that vet. That had to be misery.
Dr Pol. The Incredible Dr. Pol on NatGeo. My hero.
Large animals, being animals and not understanding exactly what has happened as we do, as a rule, do not experience the pain and stress that we do over an injury. And they adapt better than humans. A horse can break their leg all but off, where it is dangling by one small tendon, and still continue to walk on three legs. Nureyev, a son of Northen Dancer, did just that. He recovered and stood stud for several years after. A horse with a broken leg will keep trying to stand up. If a horse goes down like that you need to sit on his neck to keep him down until the ambulance/vet arrive.

But something like a twisted gut can take them out in a few hours.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#145 May 5, 2014
Pale Rider wrote:
<quoted text>
I see some woodpeckers up close, those with the bright red on the head. The Male has red all the way down to nearly the beak. The Female has some gray between beak and the red. The Blue Jay, I can't really tell the difference, like the male/female Cardinal, they are examples like you are saying.
Interesting on the fish, I never knew that. Someone asked me, how I knew the difference in a Holstein cow? Each has its own different spots, and they each have their own little personality. Their reply was, they are all Black and White, and the Red and White Too.
Interesting subject, variety, nice.
If you are truly interested, go on Amazon and buy "The Backyard BirdSong Guide" by Donald Kroodsman, Eastern and Central North Amrican edition. All the bird are pictured, male and female and their sounds are recorded, wih a few paragraphs regarding thir habits.

Put a few feeders near enough for you to see from your windows. Even late summer they will come to a feeder. Those that don't migrate will come all winter. The cheapest seed will attract them as well as the expensive.

The difference between female and male cardinals and bluejays is apparent at a glance, as it is with most birds.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#146 May 5, 2014
They cannot kill a Spook wrote:
<quoted text>
I am looking for seedlings . Every place I see them here people mow right up to them so there is no seedling.
Other thing I am looking for is Hawthorns.
Let me get on that. I'm sure I could mail or ship you some. Actually I need to make a trip to OH to pick up a concrete lawn jockey that cannot be shipped. We might be able to kill two birds with one stone. I'll ask the locals about the Hawthorns.
They cannot kill a Spook

Taylor, MI

#147 May 5, 2014
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
Let me get on that. I'm sure I could mail or ship you some. Actually I need to make a trip to OH to pick up a concrete lawn jockey that cannot be shipped. We might be able to kill two birds with one stone. I'll ask the locals about the Hawthorns.
Lawn jockey..... I have seen some odd ones on Ebay
d pantz

Toledo, OH

#148 May 5, 2014
I'm batman.
Pale Rider

Liberty, KY

#149 May 5, 2014
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
If you are truly interested, go on Amazon and buy "The Backyard BirdSong Guide" by Donald Kroodsman, Eastern and Central North Amrican edition. All the bird are pictured, male and female and their sounds are recorded, wih a few paragraphs regarding thir habits.
Put a few feeders near enough for you to see from your windows. Even late summer they will come to a feeder. Those that don't migrate will come all winter. The cheapest seed will attract them as well as the expensive.
The difference between female and male cardinals and bluejays is apparent at a glance, as it is with most birds.
In a google on ASK!

Male blue jays and female blue jays look exactly the same in appearance and plumage. The only way to distinguish between them is to closely observe the birds' distinctive behaviors over time.You may need a pair of binoculars for it.

This is what I have seen too out the kitchen window as I have a bird feeder within inches of the window. On the bird seed, you are 100% correct there.

Maybe you have seen something I haven't. I do have several books on birds... Thanks for info, it is good to share ideas like this. Good Post SL.

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