Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#364 Sep 20, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sure you can access the analyses of the ice cores Bob, if you wish to look into it.
woof
LMAO!

Cop out!

We told all you enviro freaks that global warming was a crock. The prediction was that the Arctic ice caps would disappear by 2013.

The science was settled, ya know.

Instead, it grows by 60% Explain that one, lefty. You don't have to ... I'm old enough to remember all the predictions of apoocalypse back in the 1970's ... including when they were sending us home at 11 am and telling us we were going to freeze to death due to natural gas shortages.

Do you you want me to link the video for you? Its up on the internet thanks to the Videoholic on YouTube.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-24151...
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#365 Sep 20, 2013
what_me_worry_ wrote:
<quoted text>

Apparently you are unwilling to admit your prejudice.

Of course that would conflict with your liberal ideology huh.
Both points hit the nail on the head!
what_me_worry_ wrote:
<quoted text>

I believe your liberal ideology won't allow you to concede that
using tax payer funds in the case of these field trips was in fact improper.
Incorrect. Court rulings are clear that a school is allowed to teach religion in an educational context. Most school officials are too dumb to understand the distinction, but schools are allowed to teach classes which survey the various religions from a cultural or academic standpoint.

My cousin was a public school teacher and he used to have an Byzantine Icon at his desk. When people raised crap about it, he told them it was cultural and to eff off. It's still there.

“I luv Canton”

Since: Sep 13

The 57th state

#366 Sep 20, 2013
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
LMAO!
Cop out!
We told all you enviro freaks that global warming was a crock. The prediction was that the Arctic ice caps would disappear by 2013.
The science was settled, ya know.
Instead, it grows by 60% Explain that one, lefty. You don't have to ... I'm old enough to remember all the predictions of apoocalypse back in the 1970's ... including when they were sending us home at 11 am and telling us we were going to freeze to death due to natural gas shortages.
Do you you want me to link the video for you? Its up on the internet thanks to the Videoholic on YouTube.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-24151...
"We have to redistribute wealth to combat Global warming."

Al (I need the money back from my carbon offset options) Gore

“I luv Canton”

Since: Sep 13

The 57th state

#367 Sep 20, 2013
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
Both points hit the nail on the head!
<quoted text>
Incorrect. Court rulings are clear that a school is allowed to teach religion in an educational context. Most school officials are too dumb to understand the distinction, but schools are allowed to teach classes which survey the various religions from a cultural or academic standpoint.
My cousin was a public school teacher and he used to have an Byzantine Icon at his desk. When people raised crap about it, he told them it was cultural and to eff off. It's still there.
Well Bob, does participating in a Hindu meditation ritual count as "education"?
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#368 Sep 20, 2013
what_me_worry_ wrote:
<quoted text>
Well Bob, does participating in a Hindu meditation ritual count as "education"?
How is this any different from taking children to a farm and letting them milk a cow? I don't see a problem with it.

Now if they all said the Lord's Prayer together (which to me would amount to the same thing), all the hypocrite liberals would have a conniption fit. But it is the same exact thing.

Now if they were baptising people or trying to "save" them, then they cross the line.

“I luv Canton”

Since: Sep 13

The 57th state

#369 Sep 20, 2013
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
How is this any different from taking children to a farm and letting them milk a cow? I don't see a problem with it.
Now if they all said the Lord's Prayer together (which to me would amount to the same thing), all the hypocrite liberals would have a conniption fit. But it is the same exact thing.
Now if they were baptising people or trying to "save" them, then they cross the line.
Guess we will have just have to agree to disagree.

However a Hindu meditation ritual involves getting in touch with a deity.(hardly educational) see below

http://www.sanatansociety.org/yoga_and_medita...

quote ""Yantras are visual tools that serve in meditation either as centering devices or as symbolic compositions of the energy pattern of a deity as seen by Tantric seers"

Unless of course you believe a cows teat is a religious sacrament.

Errrrr maybe you do, but then that would be sick huh unless you were a Hindu.
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#370 Sep 20, 2013
-The-Artist- wrote:
<quoted text>
By now, the facts may not matter. TN has witnessed major divisions over Islam, all instigated by the left.
This appears to be in that same mold.
And hopefully ends Lamar Alexander's career
I don't think you guys understand the brilliance of teaching kids about religion.

Rather than completely sanitizing the school experience of all religions, you throw in fringe religions like Muslims and Hindus ... and then that opens the door to also teaching about Christianity in an educational context.

And an academic and historical survey of Christianity presented properly would make it quite compelling.

Look at this as an opportunity to stick it to the lefties.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#371 Sep 20, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
No.
The proper comparison would be a one or two hour visit including a portion of time spent explaining the physical and mental processes involved in kneeling, genuflecting, and praying in a Catholic ceremony.
Of course, you would like it to be more than that, huh?
woof
You are so ignorant of Catholicism it's laughable. Of course, you'd minimize it down to actions rather than looking at the entire body of thought.

“I luv Canton”

Since: Sep 13

The 57th state

#372 Sep 20, 2013
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't think you guys understand the brilliance of teaching kids about religion.
Rather than completely sanitizing the school experience of all religions, you throw in fringe religions like Muslims and Hindus ... and then that opens the door to also teaching about Christianity in an educational context.
And an academic and historical survey of Christianity presented properly would make it quite compelling.
Look at this as an opportunity to stick it to the lefties.
The religious views, political views, sexual education etc. or lack there off should be left to parents.

I have no desire to turn that sort of education over to school teachers.

The track record of allowing hippies to control that input proves that, that is a mistake.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#373 Sep 20, 2013
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't think you guys understand the brilliance of teaching kids about religion.
Rather than completely sanitizing the school experience of all religions, you throw in fringe religions like Muslims and Hindus ... and then that opens the door to also teaching about Christianity in an educational context.
And an academic and historical survey of Christianity presented properly would make it quite compelling.
Look at this as an opportunity to stick it to the lefties.
You know, been sitting here, thinking about this.

Not a bad idea; but some issues:

Islam and Hinduism are not fringe religions. They are actually major Eastern faiths. Islam is I think the largest faith in terms of followers in the world.

Personally, I think good idea. Go ahead and try to teach kids about all the major faiths--but unfortunately the left would start to cry about the budgetary impact. Pretty aggressive agenda to cover Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam. Hmmmm....but yanno, the kids might get introduced to things like geography, history, government...stuff they're not learning now...

Ya done come up with a good idea there Bobby...
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#374 Sep 20, 2013
what_me_worry_ wrote:
<quoted text>
The religious views, political views, sexual education etc. or lack there off should be left to parents.
I have no desire to turn that sort of education over to school teachers.
The track record of allowing hippies to control that input proves that, that is a mistake.
Fair point, but I still lean toward exposing people to at least the history of why religion took root. It is generally a very good story and a very compelling one at that.
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#375 Sep 20, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>
You know, been sitting here, thinking about this.
Not a bad idea; but some issues:
Islam and Hinduism are not fringe religions. They are actually major Eastern faiths. Islam is I think the largest faith in terms of followers in the world.
Personally, I think good idea. Go ahead and try to teach kids about all the major faiths--but unfortunately the left would start to cry about the budgetary impact. Pretty aggressive agenda to cover Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam. Hmmmm....but yanno, the kids might get introduced to things like geography, history, government...stuff they're not learning now...
Ya done come up with a good idea there Bobby...
Notre Dame has classes which survey all religions. If they're not threatened by the prospect of teaching about Islam, why should parents be?

“I luv Canton”

Since: Sep 13

The 57th state

#376 Sep 20, 2013
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
Fair point, but I still lean toward exposing people to at least the history of why religion took root. It is generally a very good story and a very compelling one at that.
I will beleaguer my point one last time and then give up with you Bobbo.

NOT THE FN HIPPIE TEACHERS BIZ TO TEACH STUFF THAT IS THE PURVIEW OF PARENTS.

OK then
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#377 Sep 20, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>
You know, been sitting here, thinking about this.
Not a bad idea; but some issues:
Islam and Hinduism are not fringe religions. They are actually major Eastern faiths. Islam is I think the largest faith in terms of followers in the world.
Personally, I think good idea. Go ahead and try to teach kids about all the major faiths--but unfortunately the left would start to cry about the budgetary impact. Pretty aggressive agenda to cover Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam. Hmmmm....but yanno, the kids might get introduced to things like geography, history, government...stuff they're not learning now...
Ya done come up with a good idea there Bobby...
I read an op-ed written by someone from England who said they do that in Europe and for the life of her couldn't understand why schools in America don't do the same thing. It's one of those articles I wish I had saved.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#378 Sep 20, 2013
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
Notre Dame has classes which survey all religions. If they're not threatened by the prospect of teaching about Islam, why should parents be?
Most universities do offer these courses. I had to take a couple of non-Western civ while at Wright State and then Biblical studies at Capital.

Problem is, Bobby, school funding and the whole process (difficult) of "approved coursework," a bureaucratic nightmare. I'm sure Reader could put forth a ten-year implementation plan though. And everyone then will be happy happy happy. The kiddies will be singing Kumbaya once they've learned about the sanitized versions Islam and Judaism. We can't even get kids to complete high school now or pass basic proficiency tests in reading and math. HOw's that gonna fly when Columbus Public schools are failing miserably?
Wait what

Dublin, OH

#379 Sep 20, 2013
Enzyte Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
Fair point, but I still lean toward exposing people to at least the history of why religion took root. It is generally a very good story and a very compelling one at that.
Got a link?
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#380 Sep 20, 2013
Wait what wrote:
<quoted text>
Got a link?
http://www.crosswalk.com/blogs/michael-craven...

These early Christ-followers did not organize special interest groups or political parties. They never directly opposed Caesar; they didn't picket or protest or attempt to overthrow the ruling powers. They didn't publicly denounce or condemn the pagan world. Instead, they challenged the ruling powers by simply being a faithful, alternative presence—obedient to God. Their most distinguishing characteristic was not their ideology or their politics but their love for others. They lived as those who were, once again, living under the rule and reign of God, a sign and foretaste of what it will be fully, when Christ returns.

They expressed their opposition to infanticide by rescuing the abandoned children of Rome and raising them as their own—an enormously self-sacrificial act at a time when resources were limited and survival was in doubt.

Following the end of the Punic Wars in 146 BC, the breakdown of marriage and the family had begun in earnest. By the time of Christ, Rome was a pornographic culture. Marriage was a "loose and voluntary compact" (Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire [reprint, London: Penguin Books, 1994] 2:813). Sexual licentiousness, adultery, marital dissolution, and pornography were widespread. It was into this depraved cultural context that Christians would introduce a radically new and different view of life, sexuality, marriage, and parenting. In contrast to the Roman concept of Patria Potestas, according to which fathers had the right to kill their wives and children, Christians taught husbands to love their wives as Christ loves the church. Eros gave way to agape.

The early Christians, acting in obedience to Christ, began to care for the poor, the sick, and the marginalized. So alien were their charitable acts and self-sacrificial lives that the Romans referred to them as "the third race." In the centuries to follow, even though Christians were still a demographic minority, their care of the poor and sick, would serve as the first steps in achieving cultural authority. By being seen as those who reached out to and cared for the weak and suffering, the early church would establish its "right to stand for the community as a whole" (John Howard Yoder, For the Nations: Essays Evangelical and Public [Eugene, OR: Wifp and Stock, 1997] p. 8). Sociologist James Davidson Hunter points out, "because Christian charity was beneficial to all, including pagans, imperial authority [political authority] would be weakened" (To Change the World, 2009, p. 55).

Julian the Apostate, the last pagan emperor of Rome, clearly understood the power of these Christians when he wrote the following:

These impious Galileans (Christians) not only feed their own, but ours also; welcoming them with their agape, they attract them, as children are attracted with cakes… Whilst the pagan priests neglect the poor, the hated Galileans devote themselves to works of charity, and by a display of false compassion have established and given effect to their pernicious errors. Such practice is common among them, and causes contempt for our gods (Epistle to Pagan High Priests).

Emperor Julian clearly saw the writing on the wall. The Roman Empire would not succumb to political upheaval or force but to love, the love of Christ. Julian's dying words in AD 363 were "vicisti Galilaee" (You Galileans [Christians] have conquered!).

Once imperial power was discredited by the superior life and ethic of the Christian community, the church would build upon its newfound cultural credibility and eventually ascend to the heights of cultural power and influence. And, Western civilization would become the most successful civilization in history.
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#381 Sep 20, 2013
Wait what wrote:
<quoted text>
Got a link?
These early Christ-followers did not organize special interest groups or political parties. They never directly opposed Caesar; they didn't picket or protest or attempt to overthrow the ruling powers. They didn't publicly denounce or condemn the pagan world. Instead, they challenged the ruling powers by simply being a faithful, alternative presence—obedient to God. Their most distinguishing characteristic was not their ideology or their politics but their love for others. They lived as those who were, once again, living under the rule and reign of God, a sign and foretaste of what it will be fully, when Christ returns.

They expressed their opposition to infanticide by rescuing the abandoned children of Rome and raising them as their own—an enormously self-sacrificial act at a time when resources were limited and survival was in doubt.

Following the end of the Punic Wars in 146 BC, the breakdown of marriage and the family had begun in earnest. By the time of Christ, Rome was a pornographic culture. Marriage was a "loose and voluntary compact" (Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire [reprint, London: Penguin Books, 1994] 2:813). Sexual licentiousness, adultery, marital dissolution, and pornography were widespread. It was into this depraved cultural context that Christians would introduce a radically new and different view of life, sexuality, marriage, and parenting. In contrast to the Roman concept of Patria Potestas, according to which fathers had the right to kill their wives and children, Christians taught husbands to love their wives as Christ loves the church. Eros gave way to agape.

The early Christians, acting in obedience to Christ, began to care for the poor, the sick, and the marginalized. So alien were their charitable acts and self-sacrificial lives that the Romans referred to them as "the third race." In the centuries to follow, even though Christians were still a demographic minority, their care of the poor and sick, would serve as the first steps in achieving cultural authority. By being seen as those who reached out to and cared for the weak and suffering, the early church would establish its "right to stand for the community as a whole" (John Howard Yoder, For the Nations: Essays Evangelical and Public [Eugene, OR: Wifp and Stock, 1997] p. 8). Sociologist James Davidson Hunter points out, "because Christian charity was beneficial to all, including pagans, imperial authority [political authority] would be weakened" (To Change the World, 2009, p. 55).

Julian the Apostate, the last pagan emperor of Rome, clearly understood the power of these Christians when he wrote the following:

These impious Galileans (Christians) not only feed their own, but ours also; welcoming them with their agape, they attract them, as children are attracted with cakes… Whilst the pagan priests neglect the poor, the hated Galileans devote themselves to works of charity, and by a display of false compassion have established and given effect to their pernicious errors. Such practice is common among them, and causes contempt for our gods (Epistle to Pagan High Priests).

Emperor Julian clearly saw the writing on the wall. The Roman Empire would not succumb to political upheaval or force but to love, the love of Christ. Julian's dying words in AD 363 were "vicisti Galilaee" (You Galileans [Christians] have conquered!).

Once imperial power was discredited by the superior life and ethic of the Christian community, the church would build upon its newfound cultural credibility and eventually ascend to the heights of cultural power and influence. And, Western civilization would become the most successful civilization in history.
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#382 Sep 20, 2013
These early Christ-followers did not organize special interest groups or political parties. They never directly opposed Caesar; they didn't picket or protest or attempt to overthrow the ruling powers. They didn't publicly denounce or condemn the pagan world. Instead, they challenged the ruling powers by simply being a faithful, alternative presence—obedient to God. Their most distinguishing characteristic was not their ideology or their politics but their love for others. They lived as those who were, once again, living under the rule and reign of God, a sign and foretaste of what it will be fully, when Christ returns.

They expressed their opposition to infanticide by rescuing the abandoned children of Rome and raising them as their own—an enormously self-sacrificial act at a time when resources were limited and survival was in doubt.

Following the end of the Punic Wars in 146 BC, the breakdown of marriage and the family had begun in earnest. By the time of Christ, Rome was a pornographic culture. Marriage was a "loose and voluntary compact" (Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire [reprint, London: Penguin Books, 1994] 2:813). Sexual licentiousness, adultery, marital dissolution, and pornography were widespread. It was into this depraved cultural context that Christians would introduce a radically new and different view of life, sexuality, marriage, and parenting. In contrast to the Roman concept of Patria Potestas, according to which fathers had the right to kill their wives and children, Christians taught husbands to love their wives as Christ loves the church. Eros gave way to agape.

The early Christians, acting in obedience to Christ, began to care for the poor, the sick, and the marginalized. So alien were their charitable acts and self-sacrificial lives that the Romans referred to them as "the third race." In the centuries to follow, even though Christians were still a demographic minority, their care of the poor and sick, would serve as the first steps in achieving cultural authority. By being seen as those who reached out to and cared for the weak and suffering, the early church would establish its "right to stand for the community as a whole" (John Howard Yoder, For the Nations: Essays Evangelical and Public [Eugene, OR: Wifp and Stock, 1997] p. 8). Sociologist James Davidson Hunter points out, "because Christian charity was beneficial to all, including pagans, imperial authority [political authority] would be weakened" (To Change the World, 2009, p. 55).

Julian the Apostate, the last pagan emperor of Rome, clearly understood the power of these Christians when he wrote the following:

These impious Galileans (Christians) not only feed their own, but ours also; welcoming them with their agape, they attract them, as children are attracted with cakes… Whilst the pagan priests neglect the poor, the hated Galileans devote themselves to works of charity, and by a display of false compassion have established and given effect to their pernicious errors. Such practice is common among them, and causes contempt for our gods (Epistle to Pagan High Priests).

Emperor Julian clearly saw the writing on the wall. The Roman Empire would not succumb to political upheaval or force but to love, the love of Christ. Julian's dying words in AD 363 were "vicisti Galilaee" (You Galileans [Christians] have conquered!).

Once imperial power was discredited by the superior life and ethic of the Christian community, the church would build upon its newfound cultural credibility and eventually ascend to the heights of cultural power and influence. And, Western civilization would become the most successful civilization in history.
Enzyte Bob

Reynoldsburg, OH

#383 Sep 20, 2013
Wait what wrote:
<quoted text>
Got a link?
http://www.crosswalk.com/blogs/michael-craven...

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