Oliver Canterberry

Columbus, OH

#21 Jun 20, 2013
Obama also had a military cross removed from a base in Afghanistan and he also had Georgetown University cover over a symbol of the name of Jesus. Seems our President of the world and would be World Dictators wants no other object of worship other than himself. Its interesting that he has no such problems with Muslims.

“Meh.”

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

#22 Jun 20, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
Segregated? Um, a lot of inner city Catholic schools actually provide a lot of financial assistance for disadvantaged kids to attend, does not matter what their religion or race is.
How do I know this? My alma mater high school does this. Alumnae such as myself donate to scholarship and financial assistance funds for this. And the kids get better educations...
Need to bite my tongue til it bleeds here...
If we read closely, we might see that this is a speech given to folks in Northern Ireland.

Now class, can we think of any special reasons why subjects like division between faiths-especially between these two stated faiths, might be of relevance to Northern Irish communities?

Feel free to use you textbooks or internet resources to complete this exercise. You can work with your study partner if needed.

“Zuzu's Petals”

Since: Sep 10

Bedford Falls

#23 Jun 20, 2013
tranpsosition wrote:
<quoted text>
If we read closely, we might see that this is a speech given to folks in Northern Ireland.
Now class, can we think of any special reasons why subjects like division between faiths-especially between these two stated faiths, might be of relevance to Northern Irish communities?
Feel free to use you textbooks or internet resources to complete this exercise. You can work with your study partner if needed.
What about Muslim-based schools? His comments continuously are against Christians, not Islam. It doesn't take a rocket scientists to figure this guy out. His kids attend private schools, he needs to lead by example, put them in public schools.

“Meh.”

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

#24 Jun 20, 2013
Zoe Regen wrote:
<quoted text>
What about Muslim-based schools? His comments continuously are against Christians, not Islam. It doesn't take a rocket scientists to figure this guy out. His kids attend private schools, he needs to lead by example, put them in public schools.
Two quick and fairly basic questions.

Can you, in a few sentences, summarize the N Irish cultural divide and larger conflict to which Obama is referring?

Can you list the groups at conflict in your above summary?

If you're able to complete the above, why he's chosen to focus on these two faith groups should become fairly apparent. If you find yourself unable to complete the above, please let me know and we can work through them together.
Duke for Mayor

Akron, OH

#25 Jun 20, 2013
tranpsosition wrote:
<quoted text>
Two quick and fairly basic questions.
Can you, in a few sentences, summarize the N Irish cultural divide and larger conflict to which Obama is referring?
Can you list the groups at conflict in your above summary?
If you're able to complete the above, why he's chosen to focus on these two faith groups should become fairly apparent. If you find yourself unable to complete the above, please let me know and we can work through them together.
Certain people here, even those professing to have valuable degrees from elite private college institutions, are simply incapable of engaging in independent thought, and lack the most basic reading comprehension skills.

They think that reading a blog that quotes one or two sentences from a thirty minute speech completely out of context, with no consideration of where the speech is being given, or to whom, qualifies.

Certain people here are simply, complete and utter morons.

woof
Ohio Attorney

Circleville, OH

#26 Jun 20, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
Certain people here, even those professing to have valuable degrees from elite private college institutions, are simply incapable of engaging in independent thought, and lack the most basic reading comprehension skills.
They think that reading a blog that quotes one or two sentences from a thirty minute speech completely out of context, with no consideration of where the speech is being given, or to whom, qualifies.
Certain people here are simply, complete and utter morons.
woof
Like you!

“animis opibusque parati”

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#27 Jun 20, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
Certain people here, even those professing to have valuable degrees from elite private college institutions, are simply incapable of engaging in independent thought, and lack the most basic reading comprehension skills.
They think that reading a blog that quotes one or two sentences from a thirty minute speech completely out of context, with no consideration of where the speech is being given, or to whom, qualifies.
Certain people here are simply, complete and utter morons.
woof
You think Hussein would go to a Muslim nation and lecture them about their needed desegregation of Muslim v. Jewish/Christian schools?

Since: Apr 13

Hilliard, OH

#28 Jun 20, 2013
Thinking people know that Obama was playing to a much larger audience:
----------

It's already been firmly established that if a person, group or ideology disagrees with Barack Obama, he becomes fixated on them and then, any opportunity he gets, he makes provocative comments that could be interpreted as a warning shot. The message? Barack Obama doesn't forget ideological unfaithfulness, and if he can, he'll shut you up by shutting you down.

The president has imposed his bad attitude on, to name but a few: Conservatives, specifically of the tea party brand, right-leaning talk radio, Fox News, and the group the left views as the seat of pro-life advocacy, the Catholic Church.

Catholicism is a prime target because it's an autonomous, self-governing entity that continues to insist on having the freedom to exercise the First Amendment right to freedom of religion, and has defied the administration by refusing to submit to Obamacare contraceptive and abortion directives.

So while in Northern Ireland for the G8 summit, Obama didn't waste the opportunity to taunt Catholics worldwide by saying inflammatory things to schoolchildren. Despite the fact that just days prior, Vatican Prefect Archbishop Gerhard Müller told Scots that Catholic education is "a critical component of the Church," Barack Obama, speaking to an audience of about 2,000 students at Belfast's Waterfront hall, made what was described as "an alarming call for an end to Catholic education," saying:

If towns remain divided-if Catholics have their schools and buildings and Protestants have theirs, if we can't see ourselves in one another and fear or resentment are allowed to harden-that too encourages division and discourages cooperation.

It's hard to recall, but when the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize winner was in Indonesia, Cairo or Turkey, did he also suggest to Muslims that schooling children in madrassas "encourages division and discourages cooperation?"

Of course not. And while the comparison may seem extreme, Barack Obama's animosity towards Catholicism, although expressed in a more dignified manner, is eerily reminiscent of gay activist Dan Savage, founder of "It Gets Better" and Savage Love sex advisor.

Read more: http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2013/06/b...
Follow us:@AmericanThinker on Twitter | AmericanThinker on Facebook

Since: Apr 13

Hilliard, OH

#30 Jun 20, 2013
RU_Kiddingme wrote:
At least Duke and Transposition got it.
Making this statement in imperialist-controlled Northern Ireland is completely different from making it in the United States. He's talking to the Protestants who have oppressed the Catholics in Ireland for centuries.
George - you are breath-takingly stupid.
The breathtakingly stupid are those who believe the message wasn't intended for a domestic audience. You act as if this were the first time Obama has attacked Catholicism.
But let's assume that Obama was only speaking of Northern Ireland. What does he hope to gain? The animosity of UK citizens? He's got it, from both Catholics and Protestants now. Imagine if David Cameron came here and publicly said that schools like Africentric High School here in Columbus were "divisive." What would you say to that, Torchy?

“Meh.”

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

#32 Jun 20, 2013
...I'm not sure saying he's earned the animosity of folks here would be accurate at all.

The Belfast visit was immensely popular on the main isle and seems to have gone over pretty well over there!

Any time a political leader is willing to come into N. Ireland, let alone make a commitment to work to address the continuing issues, it's going to be pretty popular. The concerns are often overlooked, just having someone come in and recognize that they're still a priority is a major deal. And telling folks there, especially young people, that the peace they've brokered is an example for the world is a wonderful thing to have done. Because it really is.

Since: Apr 13

Hilliard, OH

#33 Jun 20, 2013
RU_Kiddingme wrote:
<quoted text>
Can you breathe with your mouth closed, George?
Nowhere in his comments did President Obama call Catholic schools "segregated". He said that both Catholic AND Protestant schools "encourage division". He called out everyone. Whether or not they like it is beside the point. He spoke the truth and called out everyone. You, with your victim mentality, read far too much into the comment.
A real college graduate would be able to understand that.
A real college graduate can read between the lines, moron:

"Even a century after we achieved our own peace, we were not fully united. When I was a boy, many cities still had separate drinking fountains and lunch counters and washrooms for blacks and whites. My own parents’ marriage would have been illegal in certain states. And someone who looked like me often had a hard time casting a ballot, much less being on a ballot."

Water fountains and lunch counters in the South...what's the adjective used with those words?

“Meh.”

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

#34 Jun 20, 2013
Just to check, I've gone through a host of N Irish online newspapers and collected the editorials about the visit below. Thought I should actually double check and see if folks over there were pleased!

Belfast Telegraph
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/opinion/edi...

UTV's Editorial Blog
http://www.u.tv/blogs/Ken-Reid/Memories/80195...

Donegal news isn't updated regularly enough to comment, I think. But they have a cute article about pens! I'll check back and see if they do something new tomorrow.
http://donegalnews.com/2013/06/president-obam...

Highland Radio
http://www.highlandradio.com/2013/06/17/obama...

Fermanagh also only updates weekly, will check and report back!
http://fermanaghherald.com/

Derry Journal
http://www.derryjournal.com/news/national/oba...
http://www.derryjournal.com/news/national/tee...

And the Tyrone times used the same stories as above
http://www.tyronetimes.co.uk/

Also, there are not loads of news outlets over there. Wonder what folks do with their time!
Duke for Mayor

Akron, OH

#35 Jun 20, 2013
-Clayton Bigsby wrote:
<quoted text>The breathtakingly stupid are those who believe the message wasn't intended for a domestic audience. You act as if this were the first time Obama has attacked Catholicism.
But let's assume that Obama was only speaking of Northern Ireland. What does he hope to gain? The animosity of UK citizens? He's got it, from both Catholics and Protestants now. Imagine if David Cameron came here and publicly said that schools like Africentric High School here in Columbus were "divisive." What would you say to that, Torchy?
Only a moron suffering from a pervasive and irrational victim mentality would read or listen to that speech and conclude that it was anything other than a call for continued cooperation between two religious groups who bombed one another for decades in Northern Ireland.

You are absolutely whacked.

woof

Since: Apr 13

Hilliard, OH

#36 Jun 20, 2013
tranpsosition wrote:
...I'm not sure saying he's earned the animosity of folks here would be accurate at all.
The Belfast visit was immensely popular on the main isle and seems to have gone over pretty well over there!
Any time a political leader is willing to come into N. Ireland, let alone make a commitment to work to address the continuing issues, it's going to be pretty popular. The concerns are often overlooked, just having someone come in and recognize that they're still a priority is a major deal. And telling folks there, especially young people, that the peace they've brokered is an example for the world is a wonderful thing to have done. Because it really is.
The comments in The Telegraph don't seem to mirror your analysis.
Duke for Mayor

Akron, OH

#37 Jun 20, 2013
-tip- wrote:
<quoted text>
You think Hussein would go to a Muslim nation and lecture them about their needed desegregation of Muslim v. Jewish/Christian schools?
I think he has made several appeals for peace in Muslim countries.

What he said in Northern Ireland is no different, and comparing the divisive effects of decades of government sanctioned racial segregation in America to extremely divisive religious segregation in war torn Northern Ireland is entirely appropriate.

Methinks you doth protest too much Paco.

woof

“animis opibusque parati”

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#38 Jun 20, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
I think he has made several appeals for peace in Muslim countries.
What he said in Northern Ireland is no different, and comparing the divisive effects of decades of government sanctioned racial segregation in America to extremely divisive religious segregation in war torn Northern Ireland is entirely appropriate.
Methinks you doth protest too much Paco.
woof
Who's Paco?

And the question was whether Hussein had ever visited a Muslim nation and publicly called for desegregation of Muslim vs. Jewish and/or Christian schools and facilities?
Duke for Mayor

Akron, OH

#39 Jun 20, 2013
-Clayton Bigsby wrote:
<quoted text>A real college graduate can read between the lines, moron:
"Even a century after we achieved our own peace, we were not fully united. When I was a boy, many cities still had separate drinking fountains and lunch counters and washrooms for blacks and whites. My own parents’ marriage would have been illegal in certain states. And someone who looked like me often had a hard time casting a ballot, much less being on a ballot."
Water fountains and lunch counters in the South...what's the adjective used with those words?
Yes, he said all of that. He said quite a bit. But in your zeal to paint yourself as a victim, you seem to think that he should not draw an entirely appropriate and rational analogy between oppressive racial segregation and division in America and religious division that results in social and economic upheaval, terrorism, and war in Northern Ireland.

You flown off the rails, Paco.

http://iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/english/te...



http://www.youtube.com/watch...

woof
Duke for Mayor

Akron, OH

#40 Jun 20, 2013
-tip- wrote:
<quoted text>
Who's Paco?
And the question was whether Hussein had ever visited a Muslim nation and publicly called for desegregation of Muslim vs. Jewish and/or Christian schools and facilities?
Who's Hussein?

"In today’s hyper-connected world, what happens here has an impact on lives far from these green shores. If you continue your courageous path toward a permanent peace, and all the social and economic benefits that have come with it, that won’t just be good for you, it will be good for this entire island. It will be good for the United Kingdom. It will be good for Europe. It will be good for the world.

We need you to get this right. And what’s more, you set an example for those who seek a peace of their own. Because beyond these shores, right now, in scattered corners of the world, there are people living in the grip of conflict -- ethnic conflict, religious conflict, tribal conflicts -- and they know something better is out there. And they’re groping to find a way to discover how to move beyond the heavy hand of history, to put aside the violence. They’re studying what you’re doing. And they’re wondering, perhaps if Northern Ireland can achieve peace, we can, too. You’re their blueprint to follow. You’re their proof of what is possible -- because hope is contagious. They’re watching to see what you do next.

Now, some of that is up to your leaders. As someone who knows firsthand how politics can encourage division and discourage cooperation, I admire the Northern Ireland Executive and the Northern Ireland Assembly all the more for making power-sharing work. That’s not easy to do. It requires compromise, and it requires absorbing some pain from your own side. I applaud them for taking responsibility for law enforcement and for justice, and I commend their effort to “Building a United Community”-- important next steps along your transformational journey.

Because issues like segregated schools and housing, lack of jobs and opportunity -- symbols of history that are a source of pride for some and pain for others -- these are not tangential to peace; they’re essential to it. If towns remain divided -- if Catholics have their schools and buildings, and Protestants have theirs -- if we can’t see ourselves in one another, if fear or resentment are allowed to harden, that encourages division. It discourages cooperation.

Ultimately, peace is just not about politics. It’s about attitudes; about a sense of empathy; about breaking down the divisions that we create for ourselves in our own minds and our own hearts that don’t exist in any objective reality, but that we carry with us generation after generation.

And I know, because America, we, too, have had to work hard over the decades, slowly, gradually, sometimes painfully, in fits and starts, to keep perfecting our union. A hundred and fifty years ago, we were torn open by a terrible conflict. Our Civil War was far shorter than The Troubles, but it killed hundreds of thousands of our people. And, of course, the legacy of slavery endured for generations.

Even a century after we achieved our own peace, we were not fully united. When I was a boy, many cities still had separate drinking fountains and lunch counters and washrooms for blacks and whites. My own parents’ marriage would have been illegal in certain states. And someone who looked like me often had a hard time casting a ballot, much less being on a ballot.

Read more: http://iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/english/te...

woof
Duke for Mayor

Akron, OH

#41 Jun 20, 2013
"But over time, laws changed, and hearts and minds changed, sometimes driven by courageous lawmakers, but more often driven by committed citizens. Politicians oftentimes follow rather than lead. And so, especially young people helped to push and to prod and to protest, and to make common cause with those who did not look like them. And that transformed America -- so that Malia and Sasha’s generation, they have different attitudes about differences and race than mine and certainly different from the generation before that. And each successive generation creates a new space for peace and tolerance and justice and fairness.

And while we have work to do in many ways, we have surely become more tolerant and more just, more accepting, more willing to see our diversity in America not as something to fear, but as something to welcome because it's a source of our national strength.

So as your leaders step forward to address your challenges through talks by all parties, they’ll need you young people to keep pushing them, to create a space for them, to change attitudes. Because ultimately, whether your communities deal with the past and face the future united together isn’t something you have to wait for somebody else to do –- that’s a choice you have to make right now.

It's within your power to bring about change. Whether you are a good neighbor to someone from the other side of past battles -- that’s up to you. Whether you treat them with the dignity and respect they deserve -- that’s up to you. Whether you let your kids play with kids who attend a different church -– that’s your decision. Whether you take a stand against violence and hatred, and tell extremists on both sides that no matter how many times they attack the peace, they will not succeed –- that is in your hands. And whether you reach your own outstretched hand across dividing lines, across peace walls, to build trust in a spirit of respect –- that’s up to you. The terms of peace may be negotiated by political leaders, but the fate of peace is up to each of us.

This peace in Northern Ireland has been tested over the past 15 years. It's been tested over the past year. It will be tested again. But remember something that President Clinton said when he spoke here in Belfast just a few weeks after the horrors of Omagh. That bomb, he said,“was not the last bomb of The Troubles; it was the opening shot of a vicious attack on the peace.” And whenever your peace is attacked, you will have to choose whether to respond with the same bravery that you’ve summoned so far, or whether you succumb to the worst instincts. those impulses that kept this great land divided for too long. You'll have to choose whether to keep going forward, not backwards."
Duke for Mayor

Akron, OH

#42 Jun 20, 2013
From the start, no one was naïve enough to believe that peace would be anything but a long journey. Yeats once wrote “Peace comes dropping slow.” But that doesn’t mean our efforts to forge a real and lasting peace should come dropping slow. This work is as urgent now as it has ever been, because there’s more to lose now than there has ever been.

In today’s hyper-connected world, what happens here has an impact on lives far from these green shores. If you continue your courageous path toward a permanent peace, and all the social and economic benefits that have come with it, that won’t just be good for you, it will be good for this entire island. It will be good for the United Kingdom. It will be good for Europe. It will be good for the world.

We need you to get this right. And what’s more, you set an example for those who seek a peace of their own. Because beyond these shores, right now, in scattered corners of the world, there are people living in the grip of conflict -- ethnic conflict, religious conflict, tribal conflicts -- and they know something better is out there. And they’re groping to find a way to discover how to move beyond the heavy hand of history, to put aside the violence. They’re studying what you’re doing. And they’re wondering, perhaps if Northern Ireland can achieve peace, we can, too. You’re their blueprint to follow. You’re their proof of what is possible -- because hope is contagious. They’re watching to see what you do next.

Now, some of that is up to your leaders. As someone who knows firsthand how politics can encourage division and discourage cooperation, I admire the Northern Ireland Executive and the Northern Ireland Assembly all the more for making power-sharing work. That’s not easy to do. It requires compromise, and it requires absorbing some pain from your own side. I applaud them for taking responsibility for law enforcement and for justice, and I commend their effort to “Building a United Community”-- important next steps along your transformational journey.

Because issues like segregated schools and housing, lack of jobs and opportunity -- symbols of history that are a source of pride for some and pain for others -- these are not tangential to peace; they’re essential to it. If towns remain divided -- if Catholics have their schools and buildings, and Protestants have theirs -- if we can’t see ourselves in one another, if fear or resentment are allowed to harden, that encourages division. It discourages cooperation.

Ultimately, peace is just not about politics. It’s about attitudes; about a sense of empathy; about breaking down the divisions that we create for ourselves in our own minds and our own hearts that don’t exist in any objective reality, but that we carry with us generation after generation.

And I know, because America, we, too, have had to work hard over the decades, slowly, gradually, sometimes painfully, in fits and starts, to keep perfecting our union. A hundred and fifty years ago, we were torn open by a terrible conflict. Our Civil War was far shorter than The Troubles, but it killed hundreds of thousands of our people. And, of course, the legacy of slavery endured for generations.

Even a century after we achieved our own peace, we were not fully united. When I was a boy, many cities still had separate drinking fountains and lunch counters and washrooms for blacks and whites. My own parents’ marriage would have been illegal in certain states. And someone who looked like me often had a hard time casting a ballot, much less being on a ballot.

Read more: http://iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/english/te...

woof

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