Gas prices shoot past $4

Gas prices shoot past $4

There are 64 comments on the WTVG-TV Toledo story from Jun 4, 2013, titled Gas prices shoot past $4. In it, WTVG-TV Toledo reports that:

If you've been holding off on filling up the gas tank, you might regret it this afternoon.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WTVG-TV Toledo.

“Paper Or Plastic?”

Since: Nov 11

Albakoikee

#21 Jun 8, 2013
yea right wrote:
<quoted text>
Price in Pawleys Island this morning is 3.10 per gallon.
Maybe I'll run down there this afternoon and get a tank of gas, a hammock and a couple of sweetgrass baskets.
Che Reagan Christ

Medina, OH

#22 Jun 8, 2013
Neutral Party wrote:
Plenty of oil in the ground yet we can't get it to the pump. Too many environmentalist and bureaucrats preventing progress.
Our dependence on foreign oil and the middle east to supply it has kept this country as a addict for 50 years.
And neither party has or is doing a damn thing to solve this.
We are producing more domestic oil than ever.

“Paper Or Plastic?”

Since: Nov 11

Albakoikee

#23 Jun 8, 2013
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
We are producing more domestic oil than ever.
And exporting it. Only a small portion is making it to the American consumer.
Che Reagan Christ

Medina, OH

#24 Jun 8, 2013
rowdy01 wrote:
<quoted text>
And exporting it. Only a small portion is making it to the American consumer.
Isn't that interesting? When will people realize that there is nothing "free" about the market in gasoline? The oil companies do what they want, and charge what they want, when they want to do it but people like Neutral Party want to blame environmentalists for gas prices.

“Paper Or Plastic?”

Since: Nov 11

Albakoikee

#25 Jun 8, 2013
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
Isn't that interesting? When will people realize that there is nothing "free" about the market in gasoline? The oil companies do what they want, and charge what they want, when they want to do it but people like Neutral Party want to blame environmentalists for gas prices.
I'm no industry expert or analyst by any stretch of the imagination. I do know that for whatever reason, refinery capacity has remained at a near standstill since the mid 1970's.
Che Reagan Christ

Medina, OH

#26 Jun 8, 2013
rowdy01 wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm no industry expert or analyst by any stretch of the imagination. I do know that for whatever reason, refinery capacity has remained at a near standstill since the mid 1970's.
Right where gasoline sellers want it. That way, they can manufacture reasons to spike prices whenever they want.
just saying

Blacklick, OH

#27 Jun 8, 2013
rowdy01 wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm no industry expert or analyst by any stretch of the imagination. I do know that for whatever reason, refinery capacity has remained at a near standstill since the mid 1970's.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_refinery#Oil...
Che Reagan Christ

Medina, OH

#28 Jun 8, 2013
just saying wrote:
Yeah. That's the problem. Oil companies are suffering financially.

-Clayton Bigsby

Since: Apr 13

Hilliard, OH

#29 Jun 8, 2013
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
Right where gasoline sellers want it. That way, they can manufacture reasons to spike prices whenever they want.
Golly gee whiz...look at the leftist tool blame the "evil oil companies" but never say a word about the EPA and its requirement for 15 different boutiques gasoline blends among other things.

“Paper Or Plastic?”

Since: Nov 11

Albakoikee

#30 Jun 8, 2013
-Clayton Bigsby wrote:
<quoted text>Golly gee whiz...look at the leftist tool blame the "evil oil companies" but never say a word about the EPA and its requirement for 15 different boutiques gasoline blends among other things.
Unless you are driving a turbocharged car and are always dogging it past boost, there is no reason to buy premium gas. Computerization allows most cars to run just fine on 87 octane.

-Clayton Bigsby

Since: Apr 13

Hilliard, OH

#31 Jun 8, 2013
rowdy01 wrote:
<quoted text>
Unless you are driving a turbocharged car and are always dogging it past boost, there is no reason to buy premium gas. Computerization allows most cars to run just fine on 87 octane.
I agree, but the industry is required to make boutique blends for different regions:

Quick: How many kinds of gasoline do we use in America? Most people would say three or six: regular unleaded, mid-grade, and premium, along with the ethanol blends of the same that have become nearly universal. The actual number is somewhere above 45, though hard to pin down exactly, according to the Government Accountability Office (GAO). It might even be closer to 70. Thirty-four states use specially blended gasoline, usually during the summer, which is one reason gasoline prices always rise during the “driving season.”

If you want a good idea of why this makes no sense, meet me in St. Louis. St. Louis, Missouri, uses one kind of gasoline; East St. Louis, Illinois, right across the Mississippi River, uses a different blend. Meanwhile, the surrounding suburbs use a third kind. Same metropolitan area, different gasolines, and they can’t be sold across jurisdictional lines, so refiners and distributors must maintain three separate systems for the three parts of the St. Louis metro area.

Is this a conspiracy of the evil oil companies to fatten their margins? Mostly no: It’s the product of EPA bureaucrats and the Clean Air Act, stubbornly maintained even though boutique fuels now deliver only marginal reductions in air pollution from cars, if any at all.
http://www.weeklystandard.com/articles/bureau... #

“Ludibrium est onus genio”

Since: Dec 11

Planet Earth

#32 Jun 8, 2013
rowdy01 wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm no industry expert or analyst by any stretch of the imagination. I do know that for whatever reason, refinery capacity has remained at a near standstill since the mid 1970's.
We're getting at least twice the gas mileage now than we were then, and that has about balanced the increase in people using it, so we really don't need more capacity. What's happening now is they can make more money on it selling it on foreign markets than they can American markets, so much of what we produce is exported. The "free market" in this case is working against us.
yep yep

Lancaster, OH

#33 Jun 8, 2013
The same thing applies to oil changes. 30 years ago most vehicles used regular (non-synthetic)motor oil and owners were advised to have it changed every 7500 miles. Today owners are advised to change their oil every 3000 miles even though today's oil is far superior to the oil of 30 years ago. It's all just BS to sell more oil.

“Paper Or Plastic?”

Since: Nov 11

Albakoikee

#34 Jun 8, 2013
yep yep wrote:
The same thing applies to oil changes. 30 years ago most vehicles used regular (non-synthetic)motor oil and owners were advised to have it changed every 7500 miles. Today owners are advised to change their oil every 3000 miles even though today's oil is far superior to the oil of 30 years ago. It's all just BS to sell more oil.
Back in the day, oil changes were recommended every 2,000 miles, now the major players in the oil change industry recommend every 3000 miles,which is what I do based on personal preference. If you research your owner's manual you'll find anywhere from 5,000 to 7,500 miles recommended.

“Tenured Marxist Radical”

Since: Jan 13

Ivy League-ISIS

#35 Jun 8, 2013
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
We are producing more domestic oil than ever.
http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/leafhandler....

No we aren't.
They cannot kill a Spook

United States

#36 Jun 8, 2013
-The-Artist- wrote:
I am doing all I can. More is more money and at the orices for weapons and ammo one can never have too much money

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#37 Jun 8, 2013
Real Tea Party wrote:
I have a Hummer, boo boo! Always amazed to see people who can't afford a gas guzzler and complain about gas price, reminds me of the housing sub prime mortgage loan crisis when poor folks buying houses....
Get a moped or scooter for high price summer use and keep Hummer for the winter.

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#38 Jun 8, 2013
yep yep wrote:
The same thing applies to oil changes. 30 years ago most vehicles used regular (non-synthetic)motor oil and owners were advised to have it changed every 7500 miles. Today owners are advised to change their oil every 3000 miles even though today's oil is far superior to the oil of 30 years ago. It's all just BS to sell more oil.
Even Jiffy Lube is beginning to walk away from the 3K miles b.s. For most of us, even just in town, 5K is good, even for an abundance of caution.

Fram now sells a filter that (claims) to add the oil additives over time that your original oil change loses. Mostly, it's the lack of additives over time that causes oil to go bad, not the base stock itself.
Alonzo Jay King Jr

Dallas, TX

#39 Jun 8, 2013
just saying wrote:
Shell station owner on High St says they're being told to expect prices around $4.50 by the end of this month.
Here is TX still $3.35...

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#40 Jun 8, 2013
Alonzo Jay King Jr wrote:
<quoted text>Here is TX still $3.35...
Lucky you.

Supposedly the price spike is caused by our gas supply coming from Chiccongo area refineries.

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