Docs protest stealth calls on access for patients | The Columbus Dispatch

Alarmed by a shortage of primary-care doctors, Obama administration officials are recruiting a team of "mystery shoppers" to pose as patients, call doctors' offices and request appointments to see how difficult it is for people to get care when they need it. Full Story
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Yum Yum Sauce

Columbus, OH

#2 Jun 27, 2011
This is like prank calling by the federal government. How very mature.
Janis McDonald

Pittsburgh, PA

#3 Jun 27, 2011
If the government wants to do something worthwhile, why don't they have somebody check up on the coding for procedures that are billed against procedures that are actually done? Recently my cousin had several skin tags removed (a procedure that allows $30 per tag). The doctor billed the procedure as a type of "skin surgery" that reimbursed $700 per surgery). I suspect this is NOT an isolated incident!

Since: Dec 09

Coshocton, OH

#4 Jun 27, 2011
Another Obama witch hunt!
grace

Dublin, OH

#5 Jun 27, 2011
Now the shoe is on the other foot. The doctors did not complain when the government was setting up the system to spy on the patients. My doctor, and many others are going digital with patients' records in order to enable the government to more easily have access to all our personal business. And it will make our records vulnerable to hackers. All our information is being put in computers which can be accessed by government employees and non-gov. employees. The doctors' offices are no longer safe places for your medical records and personal business. And the doctors don't care because they knuckle under to the government.
Reader

Columbus, OH

#6 Jun 27, 2011
grace wrote:
Now the shoe is on the other foot. The doctors did not complain when the government was setting up the system to spy on the patients. My doctor, and many others are going digital with patients' records in order to enable the government to more easily have access to all our personal business. And it will make our records vulnerable to hackers. All our information is being put in computers which can be accessed by government employees and non-gov. employees. The doctors' offices are no longer safe places for your medical records and personal business. And the doctors don't care because they knuckle under to the government.
I believe that you have a serious misunderstanding of the process of electronic medical record keeping. The fact that information is stored digitally does not make it any more available to the government than infomation stored on paper. In some instances (such as faxing portions of records from one provider to another, or providing copies by courier, mail or other means), the electronic record may actually allow a higher level of security.

Certainly this will require diligence to ensure safety from hackers--but the current safety of medical records is somewhat illusory.
Reader

Columbus, OH

#7 Jun 27, 2011
This isn't anything really new or unusual. Locally there have been periodic studies of the availability of pre-natal care, conducted in precisely the same way. Information given over the phone to a new patient should be standard. Certainly not anything like a trade secret.

If there are doctors in the business of steering certain populations away by giving them appointments further in the future, this is something that may come to light, as it should. But, for the most part this is fairly benign information that any prospective patient might ask and receive. And the information garnered is extremely helpful from a policy standpoint of evaluating the future need for doctors by locale and population.
Ridiculous

Dublin, OH

#8 Jun 27, 2011
I was turned down by a local doctor while having a great insurance policy because of the high deductible. (docs aren't getting paid). The high deductibles will also be part of the exchange insurances as part of the reform in 2014. As usual, government fails to address what it needs to address and focuses on saving or creating jobs just to squawk.
Just Saying

Dublin, OH

#9 Jun 27, 2011
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I believe that you have a serious misunderstanding of the process of electronic medical record keeping. The fact that information is stored digitally does not make it any more available to the government than infomation stored on paper. In some instances (such as faxing portions of records from one provider to another, or providing copies by courier, mail or other means), the electronic record may actually allow a higher level of security.
Certainly this will require diligence to ensure safety from hackers--but the current safety of medical records is somewhat illusory.
I get you're a liberal, but you can defend the indefensible. Here you go, Reader!

http://ehealth.ky.gov/index.html
grace

Dublin, OH

#10 Jun 27, 2011
I have begun to suspect that Reader, who seems to be at that computer 24/7 to argue with anybody who posts against Leviathan aka Government is a government employee whose job it is to stop anybody who is starting to have his eyes opened and get those eyes closed again. Reader would have us all to believe that Reader is an expert on all subjects pertaining to Government and its intrusive programs. I wonder if mole would be a good term to describe Reader? Reader is everywhere. Maybe there are many "Readers" out here who are paid to obfuscate.
Reader

Columbus, OH

#11 Jun 27, 2011
Just Saying wrote:
<quoted text>
I get you're a liberal, but you can defend the indefensible. Here you go, Reader!
http://ehealth.ky.gov/index.html
I don't know what you were trying to prove with that link--which was a whole website, but here is a snippet:

"It's Secure.
Properly implemented, CCHIT-certified electronic health record systems uphold the security protections you use every day to maintain the confidentiality and security of your patient records. These systems also provide protections necessary to meet privacy and security guidelines set forth by HIPAA and state patient privacy laws."

Frankly, I don't know any record system that is 100% secure, but certainly paper systems are incredibly vulnerable, but we are so accustomed to them that we don't even see the risks. Paper systems are also vulnerable to other things such as loss, destruction, inaccessibility, particularly when changing providers, etc.

But--I am really interested in the claims that the government has a direct line into all electronic medical records. Outside of the tinfoil hat crew, does anyone have any substantiation of this one?
Reader

Columbus, OH

#12 Jun 27, 2011
grace wrote:
I have begun to suspect that Reader, who seems to be at that computer 24/7 to argue with anybody who posts against Leviathan aka Government is a government employee whose job it is to stop anybody who is starting to have his eyes opened and get those eyes closed again. Reader would have us all to believe that Reader is an expert on all subjects pertaining to Government and its intrusive programs. I wonder if mole would be a good term to describe Reader? Reader is everywhere. Maybe there are many "Readers" out here who are paid to obfuscate.
I love it.

Maybe I am a computer program developed by the evil Dr. Phibes.

Or an evil librarian bent on world destruction in revenge for being made to learn computer filing or retire.
John Blutarsky

Columbus, OH

#13 Jun 27, 2011
Nice. First the Obama White House wanted people to report to them anything "fishy" being emailed or posted online about his healthcare bill and now they want to snoop on doctors. Nice.
Tony

Chillicothe, OH

#14 Jun 27, 2011
Reader wrote:
If there are doctors in the business of steering certain populations away by giving them appointments further in the future, this is something that may come to light, as it should.
Doctors know that Medicare and Medicaid are notorious for not paying in a timely manner and paying much less than is billed. If private insurers do this, the patient is responsible for the balance, and can be gone after by collections. With public insurance, the doctor can't do this, so he shifts the cost to his paying customers. That's a big part of the reason medical costs are going up.

Other businesses can refuse to serve customers who don't pay their bills, why not doctors?
Tony

Chillicothe, OH

#15 Jun 27, 2011
grace wrote:
I wonder if mole would be a good term to describe Reader? Reader is everywhere. Maybe there are many "Readers" out here who are paid to obfuscate.
Probably! But I doubt that it's one sided. Both sides have their propaganda, and neither side is above paying people to spread it. It's easier to blame the other side and get everyone stirred up about it, so we won't notice that they aren't really trying to fix it.

They're two heads of the same dragon.
Tony

Chillicothe, OH

#16 Jun 27, 2011
Ridiculous wrote:
I was turned down by a local doctor while having a great insurance policy because of the high deductible.(docs aren't getting paid).
Yep. What do they think a restaurant owner would do if they went in and said they wanted to eat, but were only going to pay 60% of the bill?
Just Saying

Dublin, OH

#17 Jun 27, 2011
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't know what you were trying to prove with that link--which was a whole website, but here is a snippet:
"It's Secure.
Properly implemented, CCHIT-certified electronic health record systems uphold the security protections you use every day to maintain the confidentiality and security of your patient records. These systems also provide protections necessary to meet privacy and security guidelines set forth by HIPAA and state patient privacy laws."
Frankly, I don't know any record system that is 100% secure, but certainly paper systems are incredibly vulnerable, but we are so accustomed to them that we don't even see the risks. Paper systems are also vulnerable to other things such as loss, destruction, inaccessibility, particularly when changing providers, etc.
But--I am really interested in the claims that the government has a direct line into all electronic medical records. Outside of the tinfoil hat crew, does anyone have any substantiation of this one?
I provided you with a link to the website introducing the State of Kentucky government who will now begin to compile and have the ability to access all health records for their state. They were given federal funds to do so. You care to include "tinfoil" in your response and poo-poo THAT link?
Just Saying

Dublin, OH

#18 Jun 27, 2011
grace wrote:
I have begun to suspect that Reader, who seems to be at that computer 24/7 to argue with anybody who posts against Leviathan aka Government is a government employee whose job it is to stop anybody who is starting to have his eyes opened and get those eyes closed again. Reader would have us all to believe that Reader is an expert on all subjects pertaining to Government and its intrusive programs. I wonder if mole would be a good term to describe Reader? Reader is everywhere. Maybe there are many "Readers" out here who are paid to obfuscate.
Perhaps. I could have posted op-eds or blogs regarding the State of Kentucky receiving federal funds to compile and monitor their citizens' health records, or the medical journal articles which show the errors of EMRs, or listed by dollar amount the federal funding being given to states to compile information.

I wonder how Reader expects the federal government to give bonuses to those practitioners who are doing a good job with treatment if the government doesn't have access to the records? How will they know who's been treated with a less expensive drug for these symptoms from this disease with a better outcome if those records are not available?
Reader

Columbus, OH

#19 Jun 27, 2011
Just Saying wrote:
<quoted text>
I provided you with a link to the website introducing the State of Kentucky government who will now begin to compile and have the ability to access all health records for their state. They were given federal funds to do so. You care to include "tinfoil" in your response and poo-poo THAT link?
I didn't see anything to indicate that the state government will have access to all health records.
Just Saying

Dublin, OH

#20 Jun 27, 2011
John Blutarsky wrote:
Nice. First the Obama White House wanted people to report to them anything "fishy" being emailed or posted online about his healthcare bill and now they want to snoop on doctors. Nice.
I've likely already been reported; no need to overwhelm the poor folks!

"There is a lot of disinformation about health insurance reform out there, spanning from control of personal finances to end of life care. These rumors often travel just below the surface via chain emails or through casual conversation. Since we can’t keep track of all of them here at the White House, we’re asking for your help. If you get an email or see something on the web about health insurance reform that seems fishy, send it to flag@whitehouse.gov".

http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/Facts-Are-Stub...
fiddle faddle

Dublin, OH

#21 Jun 27, 2011
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I believe that you have a serious misunderstanding of the process of electronic medical record keeping. The fact that information is stored digitally does not make it any more available to the government than infomation stored on paper. In some instances (such as faxing portions of records from one provider to another, or providing copies by courier, mail or other means), the electronic record may actually allow a higher level of security.
Certainly this will require diligence to ensure safety from hackers--but the current safety of medical records is somewhat illusory.
You are full of sheet. If hackers are getting into the Defense Dept. and getting into the Pentagon you can bet your a ss they can get into the computers that store our medical records. If Kentucky is involved in the Fed System then Kentucky is the State being used to pave the way. The Feds did the same thing with their takeover of the education system. They introduced different aspects of the takeover into different States, perfecting The System here and there. Pennsylvania was used for one aspect, Washington for another. Those who label watchdogs as Tin Foil Hat wearers are trying to keep others from paying attention to the whistle blowers by belittling them. Reader wants to lull you into not paying any attention so Big Brother will have less trouble working The Plan. Reader is a natural when it comes to Diaprax.

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