“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#42 Feb 16, 2013
Hugh Victor Thompson III wrote:
<quoted text>In the late '90s, we had 2% unemployment here in Franklin County. Delaware County was closer to 1%. I remember signs for fast food starting at $10 an hour. There were manufacturing jobs available for 18 year old high school grads for $15 an hour with real benefits. Building an average home here took nine months instead of four months with the labor shortage.
That was pretty much true throughout Ohio back then. Where I was working at the time in Dayton, we had a terrible time not only recruiting but keeping educated technicians, programmers/developers, and project managers. Why? The market was on steroids. No matter how good the offer was, there seemed to be a better one around the bend. Your "pedigree" is always important; but there wasn't a big enough pool of those who had the "pedigree" we were looking for and more jobs than those qualified.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#43 Feb 16, 2013
-The-Artist- wrote:
<quoted text>
Didn't know that, Cleveland economy has sucked my entire lifetime. Rates probably haven't been that low since WWII.
Not sure about that. Back in in the 90s perhaps, depended upon your own personal job market? IT/mapping/software development was hopping back then and there are a few very good software shops in Cleveland.(Know that from experience, a few tried to recruit me. I just have no desire to live in Cleveland or anywhere north of Columbus any longer.) The medical industry is pretty hot up there as well. IT industry usually suffers fast in any economic downturn; but it's usually one of the first to snap back, too. Also the auto industry was not suffering an iota in the 90s. Toledo knocked down its old Chrysler/Jeep plant that was in existence since prior to WWII (was then the Willys plant) and built a new state-of-the-art factory to produce Jeeps--running at full employment then.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#44 Feb 16, 2013
Spookhere F trollsp wrote:
<quoted text>
I already file and pay quarterly. Everyone should have to do that. If there were no payroll deductions you can be people would be standing on the throat of the elected officials pissing away money .
Exactly. Silent, legal protest.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#45 Feb 16, 2013
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
You give your men envelopes with $10 in them?
You give nothing but grief and heartburn.

“Hi-Yo Silver! Away!”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#46 Feb 16, 2013
Hugh Victor Thompson III wrote:
<quoted text>In the late '90s, we had 2% unemployment here in Franklin County. Delaware County was closer to 1%. I remember signs for fast food starting at $10 an hour. There were manufacturing jobs available for 18 year old high school grads for $15 an hour with real benefits. Building an average home here took nine months instead of four months with the labor shortage.
To the Artist and others, what George said ^^^

Thanks George for recalling the details, I couldn't pin it down immediately.

“Hi-Yo Silver! Away!”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#47 Feb 16, 2013
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
The key phrase is 'several years ago.' No where near the number of $ are going into the economny now, and much less eating out...eaven at fast food places. Lots have closed since 2008.
Come stand in line with me at ANY sit down restaurant here in Columbus on any Friday or Saturday night.

At the depth of the Great Recession in '08, I could not get into a Texas Roadhouse on Saturday night without a 45 minute wait. Now it's even worse. Same with other restaurants. Oh, I don't know if it's that way at the overpriced nose-in-the-air fancy places, but where regular people eat here, there was never much drop off in business.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#48 Feb 16, 2013
Kemosahbe wrote:
<quoted text>
Come stand in line with me at ANY sit down restaurant here in Columbus on any Friday or Saturday night.
At the depth of the Great Recession in '08, I could not get into a Texas Roadhouse on Saturday night without a 45 minute wait. Now it's even worse. Same with other restaurants. Oh, I don't know if it's that way at the overpriced nose-in-the-air fancy places, but where regular people eat here, there was never much drop off in business.
My friend's daughter has been a waitress at Texas Roadhouse eight years and my step-daughter at Golden Corral through highschool, and now, so probably about 6 years. One in DE, the other in Virginia Beach. According to them, they have seen a huge drop off and lost hours and tips.

You make me remember, my Dad would not wait ANYWHERE. Back in the car, drive another 20 minutes to another place. That was so much faster.:-)

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#49 Feb 16, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>
You give nothing but grief and heartburn.
You know, I just skip his comments and consider the source.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#50 Feb 16, 2013
Kemosahbe wrote:
<quoted text>
To the Artist and others, what George said ^^^
Thanks George for recalling the details, I couldn't pin it down immediately.
I agree. And I do think the real estate prices, for the most part, were grossly inflated then.
Spookhere F trollsp

Taylor, MI

#51 Feb 16, 2013
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
Exactly. Silent, legal protest.
Moral yes cutting off the air.flow to a politicians lungs not legal.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#52 Feb 16, 2013
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
My friend's daughter has been a waitress at Texas Roadhouse eight years and my step-daughter at Golden Corral through highschool, and now, so probably about 6 years. One in DE, the other in Virginia Beach. According to them, they have seen a huge drop off and lost hours and tips.
You make me remember, my Dad would not wait ANYWHERE. Back in the car, drive another 20 minutes to another place. That was so much faster.:-)
Had a couple of kids who worked placed like Don Pablo's and BW3s in college waiting table or tending bar. It depends on where you work and when you work. The oldest, who went to school in a big sports town, cleaned up tending bar. Get a bunch of folks together who want to watch the game and only want decent service and you'll do ok.

Places like Roadhouse and Golden Corral attract the real uber-cheap crowd, Golden Corral especially. One of the kids worked at GC for a few months and left because of it. Ended up working in a local place similar to a BW3 and cleaned up. Worked around her school hours and she made good cash. Of course, the kids have to be 21 to work in places like that because they serve alcohol.

And the thinking about who eats out is somewhat skewed here. Columbus itself is pretty much at full employment. The economy here has never been terrible for long--even during 2008. People neglect to remember 1) we're a state capital--lots of state government jobs, 2) lots of banking here, 3) we also have a sizable federal government employment base here. Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo, other large areas are much different in that regard.

Hugh Victor Thompson III

“Larchmont's Leading Citizen”

Since: Dec 12

Hilliard, OH

#53 Feb 16, 2013
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree. And I do think the real estate prices, for the most part, were grossly inflated then.
Yep. To the tune of increasing 10-15% a year for a few years in my area. A lot of people bought primary residences as investments more than as "homes." And did it ever burn them in the end. The mortgage companies...well we all know what happened there. When I built my first house in 1996, they wanted to lend me two and a half times as much money as I was asking for.

“Hi-Yo Silver! Away!”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#54 Feb 16, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>
Had a couple of kids who worked placed like Don Pablo's and BW3s in college waiting table or tending bar. It depends on where you work and when you work. The oldest, who went to school in a big sports town, cleaned up tending bar. Get a bunch of folks together who want to watch the game and only want decent service and you'll do ok.
Places like Roadhouse and Golden Corral attract the real uber-cheap crowd, Golden Corral especially. One of the kids worked at GC for a few months and left because of it. Ended up working in a local place similar to a BW3 and cleaned up. Worked around her school hours and she made good cash. Of course, the kids have to be 21 to work in places like that because they serve alcohol.
And the thinking about who eats out is somewhat skewed here. Columbus itself is pretty much at full employment. The economy here has never been terrible for long--even during 2008. People neglect to remember 1) we're a state capital--lots of state government jobs, 2) lots of banking here, 3) we also have a sizable federal government employment base here. Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo, other large areas are much different in that regard.
If Roadhouse attracts a cheap crowd, why is/was it expensive to eat there? And the economy was supposedly bad here, lots of foreclosures, people getting laid off left and right, yet everybody was still eating out! Had to wait a long time to get into Outback then also.

I look for acceptable places to eat for a reasonable amount. I'm not paying $50-60 for a steak anywhere.

“Hi-Yo Silver! Away!”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#55 Feb 16, 2013
Seriouslady wrote:
<quoted text>
My friend's daughter has been a waitress at Texas Roadhouse eight years and my step-daughter at Golden Corral through highschool, and now, so probably about 6 years. One in DE, the other in Virginia Beach. According to them, they have seen a huge drop off and lost hours and tips.
You make me remember, my Dad would not wait ANYWHERE. Back in the car, drive another 20 minutes to another place. That was so much faster.:-)
My dad didn't mind waiting a reasonable amount, be wanted his coffee within about 10 seconds of sitting down, and so hot it would burn most people. If I had a dollar for every time I heard him say "Where's my coffee" and "This coffee's cold", I would be somewhat richer, lol!

Hugh Victor Thompson III

“Larchmont's Leading Citizen”

Since: Dec 12

Hilliard, OH

#56 Feb 16, 2013
Kemosahbe wrote:
<quoted text>
If Roadhouse attracts a cheap crowd, why is/was it expensive to eat there? And the economy was supposedly bad here, lots of foreclosures, people getting laid off left and right, yet everybody was still eating out! Had to wait a long time to get into Outback then also.
I look for acceptable places to eat for a reasonable amount. I'm not paying $50-60 for a steak anywhere.
I think eating out is part of the culture here. Same with going to the movies. I noticed it when I landed here in '91...back in New England, people don't go out to restaurants nearly as much as they do here, regardless of their income. There are no slow days in Columbus, whereas in the Boston area, lots of smaller places were closed on Mondays because there was so little demand.

Since: Oct 12

Rock Forever

#57 Feb 16, 2013
TonyD2 wrote:
I listened to the address and Obama saying the minimum wage should be raised to $9.00 an hour and I have a couple of questions.
Isn't this raise going to cut the standard of living for those making over the new minimum?
What did they do to deserve this intentional infliction of distress?
In remote rural areas it's a different world. There's families living on Ramen noodles. The minimum wage isn't keeping up with what it takes to live. It would be different if there's a choice of where to work but there's not.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#58 Feb 16, 2013
Kemosahbe wrote:
<quoted text>
If Roadhouse attracts a cheap crowd, why is/was it expensive to eat there? And the economy was supposedly bad here, lots of foreclosures, people getting laid off left and right, yet everybody was still eating out! Had to wait a long time to get into Outback then also.
I look for acceptable places to eat for a reasonable amount. I'm not paying $50-60 for a steak anywhere.
I've been to Roadhouse. Not expensive at all, don't even find it all that great of food. For your edification, here's the menu:

http://ww7.texasroadhouse.com/NMotion/Menus/M... (1212-10-1A).pdf

$50 for dinner for two isn't horrible. Pretty much in line with places like Olive Garden, Smokey Bones, and comparable chains.

This isn't 1960 where a burger sells for 50 cents and you're going to the malt shop with your steady using the money you made as a paperboy...

Hugh Victor Thompson III

“Larchmont's Leading Citizen”

Since: Dec 12

Hilliard, OH

#59 Feb 16, 2013
Lost In The Continuum wrote:
<quoted text>
In remote rural areas it's a different world. There's families living on Ramen noodles. The minimum wage isn't keeping up with what it takes to live. It would be different if there's a choice of where to work but there's not.
The minimum wage is a job killer. When it goes up, people are let go at any number of small businesses.
As for living in a depressed rural area, the obvious answer is to move if at all possible.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#60 Feb 16, 2013
gokeefe wrote:
<quoted text>
Had a couple of kids who worked placed like Don Pablo's and BW3s in college waiting table or tending bar. It depends on where you work and when you work. The oldest, who went to school in a big sports town, cleaned up tending bar. Get a bunch of folks together who want to watch the game and only want decent service and you'll do ok.
Places like Roadhouse and Golden Corral attract the real uber-cheap crowd, Golden Corral especially. One of the kids worked at GC for a few months and left because of it. Ended up working in a local place similar to a BW3 and cleaned up. Worked around her school hours and she made good cash. Of course, the kids have to be 21 to work in places like that because they serve alcohol.
And the thinking about who eats out is somewhat skewed here. Columbus itself is pretty much at full employment. The economy here has never been terrible for long--even during 2008. People neglect to remember 1) we're a state capital--lots of state government jobs, 2) lots of banking here, 3) we also have a sizable federal government employment base here. Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo, other large areas are much different in that regard.
The economy got hit pretty hard here. Just in this county (small) GM, Crysler, Avon and a 600 employee oil refinery shut their doors in 2008, let alone all the other closings.
New, or even repair of existing, construction came to a stand still.
The big McMansion housing developments stopped and the houses went underwater fast. Small wonder since most had 110% mortgages.
I'd like to tell you there's been a recovery, but no. It is coming back very slowly. If my job depended on the economy, I'd be in the same miserable boat as many in this tri-state area.

“Queen of my domain”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#61 Feb 16, 2013
Lost In The Continuum wrote:
<quoted text>
In remote rural areas it's a different world. There's families living on Ramen noodles. The minimum wage isn't keeping up with what it takes to live. It would be different if there's a choice of where to work but there's not.
Getting out is a viable choice....

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Columbus Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Sean Hannity 10 min Pope Che Reagan C... 86
President Trump won’t attend Barbara Bush's fu... 47 min rowdy01 20
SMALLVILLE Star in the SLAMMER! 1 hr Capt Pepe 7
Hi im Holly Hylton Your Local Racist Starbucks ... 1 hr d pants 77
The Comey Interview 1 hr d pants 166
First Lady Barbara Bush has died, at 92 2 hr Reality Speaks 26
The G.O.P. 3 hr Leftist handjob 19

Columbus Jobs

Personal Finance

Columbus Mortgages