Albemarle Offering Online Class to High School Students

A class in Albemarle County Schools is being taught entirely online. It's just the first in what could be a trend of more online courses being offered to high school students in the county. Full Story
LawyerLady

Charlottesville, VA

#1 Feb 19, 2013
I was able to make it to a physical building when I was in high school. Why can't kids now?
real central va Marine

Charlottesville, VA

#2 Feb 19, 2013
LawyerLady wrote:
I was able to make it to a physical building when I was in high school. Why can't kids now?
It's all about money. By not having to maintain the space for the classroom, and have a teacher present for every 25 students, the money saved is significant. Ain't technology great? Pretty soon we won't have to leave our homes..want to guess how childhood obesity will be then?
Anon

Stanardsville, VA

#3 Feb 19, 2013
Greene County High School has been doing online courses for over 6 years; with classes that include Latin (I-III), AP Stats, AP Chemistry, PVCC Political Science, AP Spanish and many many more. I don't see why it is such a large deal that this school is starting to do online courses when Greene has been doing it for much longer and has been very successful.
I understand that it is the "first in the county", but maybe others should be looked into.
Really Too

Buena Vista, VA

#4 Feb 19, 2013
Why not? The students are sitting in the classroom listening to ipods that were given to them by the school. What the Hell?
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#5 Feb 19, 2013
Anon wrote:
I don't see why it is such a large deal that this school is starting to do online courses
the people complaining can't figure out their remotes
CvilleMechEngr

Charlottesville, VA

#6 Feb 19, 2013
Being able to take a course online can possibly free a class period for a more advanced subject where interaction with a teacher is more critical. It's like early morning gym...another way to increase the number of classes you can fit in.
Albemarle Parent

Charlottesville, VA

#7 Feb 19, 2013
I was excited to hear that this course - relevant and practical - was added to the graduation requirements. All people should understand the compounding of interest and investment opportunities as this generation and several before will now be responsible for managing their own retirement accounts (a la 401ks). So now they relgate THIS class to on line teaching???? Lecturing and expected regurgitation doesn't work for any generation, but a dynamic curriculum taught by a live energetic instructor will allow these important life lessons to be learned.
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#8 Feb 19, 2013
Albemarle Parent wrote:
responsible for managing their own retirement accounts (a la 401ks)
http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Bogleheads%C2%...
online

Charlottesville, VA

#9 Feb 19, 2013
Why do you believe online learning is inferior? What experience has caused you to feel this way? That doesn't make any sense to me.
chuck

Palmyra, VA

#10 Feb 19, 2013
That's great that kids have the option for an online course. Also nice to see Albemarle isn't outsourcing their online course designing and utilizing their own talented staff. They got that right.
Grammar Girl

Scottsville, VA

#11 Feb 19, 2013
Anon wrote:
Greene County High School has been doing online courses for over 6 years; with classes that include Latin (I-III), AP Stats, AP Chemistry, PVCC Political Science, AP Spanish and many many more. I don't see why it is such a large deal that this school is starting to do online courses when Greene has been doing it for much longer and has been very successful.
I understand that it is the "first in the county", but maybe others should be looked into.
Have you taken a look at the AP Spanish and AP Statistics scores for Greene County? They are very low.
CvilleMechEngr

Charlottesville, VA

#12 Feb 20, 2013
online wrote:
Why do you believe online learning is inferior? What experience has caused you to feel this way? That doesn't make any sense to me.
It's fine for sidebar subjects like health. It's no good for core subjects and sciences. Those all need live interaction with instructors, lab partners, or student groups - in my opinion. If a satisfactory learning environment is not available, then online learning is certainly better than nothing. It is a good tool for getting some required non-contributing subjects out of the way to free up class periods for subjects that do contribute to a student's goals.
online

Charlottesville, VA

#13 Feb 20, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
It's fine for sidebar subjects like health. It's no good for core subjects and sciences. Those all need live interaction with instructors, lab partners, or student groups - in my opinion. If a satisfactory learning environment is not available, then online learning is certainly better than nothing. It is a good tool for getting some required non-contributing subjects out of the way to free up class periods for subjects that do contribute to a student's goals.
We'll just have to disagree on this. 5-10 years ago I would have agreed with you, but technology has come a long way and things like live interactions with teachers, lab partners, and student groups can easily be replicated online. Easily. Just think of how commonplace things like Skype, Facetime, Google Hangouts are now compared to just a few years ago. Leverage tools like that correctly and the electronic divide narrows quickly.
Adam

Charlottesville, VA

#14 Feb 21, 2013
Just a correction: My daughter Riley is at Murray High School, not Monticello. That is an important point because Mr. Craddock, the teacher, *is* at Monticello. Given Murray High School's small size, it would be much harder and more expensive to make it available at Murray if it wasn't being offered online.
real central va Marine

Charlottesville, VA

#15 Feb 21, 2013
online wrote:
<quoted text>
We'll just have to disagree on this. 5-10 years ago I would have agreed with you, but technology has come a long way and things like live interactions with teachers, lab partners, and student groups can easily be replicated online. Easily. Just think of how commonplace things like Skype, Facetime, Google Hangouts are now compared to just a few years ago. Leverage tools like that correctly and the electronic divide narrows quickly.
We're going to see , down the road, that all this "virtual" classroom time and "learning" will manifest itself in poorly prepared citizens and workers. I don't care how "good" the virtual environment is, it never comes close enough to the actual experience.
Anti Liberal

Washington, DC

#16 Feb 22, 2013
We could replace at least 50 or 60% of our teachers with this and return the taxpayer's money to its rightful owners!
sez you

Charlottesville, VA

#17 Feb 22, 2013
Anti Liberal wrote:
We could replace at least 50 or 60% of our teachers with this and return the taxpayer's money to its rightful owners!
And turn out morons like you into the workplace.

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