New Commission at UVA Hoping to Curb ...

New Commission at UVA Hoping to Curb Health Care Spending

There are 9 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Jan 6, 2013, titled New Commission at UVA Hoping to Curb Health Care Spending. In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

A new commission through the University of Virginia Miller Center is starting work to develop state policies to contain health care costs.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

Since: Oct 12

Charlottesville, VA

#1 Jan 8, 2013
"The commission says health care costs in the U.S. are continuing to climb. The problem is the rate at which these costs are growing often exceeds the rate of growth for Virginia's economy."

Gee, I wonder why that is.

It couldn't have anything to do with Obamacare, could it?
Sarg

Charlottesville, VA

#2 Jan 8, 2013
"...Policies to contain health care costs"--i.e., rationing. Obamacare is here.
cvillerealist

Dacula, GA

#3 Jan 8, 2013
The Affordable Care Act- known as Obamacare increased access, but did little to address costs. In fact, it's likely to increase costs as the 30 million or so new patients start to demand services- thereby creating more demand on an already over-stretched system.
Liberalace

Collinsville, VA

#4 Jan 8, 2013
cvillerealist wrote:
The Affordable Care Act- known as Obamacare increased access, but did little to address costs. In fact, it's likely to increase costs as the 30 million or so new patients start to demand services- thereby creating more demand on an already over-stretched system.
And fewer providers will be in the system as well. My kid? Become an attorney or engineer; not a doctor!

Oh, and perhaps UVa should concentrate on germ containment, since its infection/cleanliness rates are so splendid.

R.I.P.: Jonas Salk
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#5 Jan 8, 2013
"Hospital cost growth decelerated from 4.9 percent in 2010 down to 4.3 percent in 2011"

"the health-care law’s reduced reimbursement rates that will permanently slow hospital spending"

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/...
Tip

Charlottesville, VA

#6 Jan 8, 2013
Good maybe this will stop UVA from over charging for it's poor service. Over paid lazy doctors.
Rex

Springfield, NJ

#7 Jan 8, 2013
Tip wrote:
Good maybe this will stop UVA from over charging for it's poor service. Over paid lazy doctors.
Those overpaid Doctors need money for their mansions, sport cars, yachts, lavish vacations, & etc!!
Charles A Francis

Raleigh, NC

#11 Jan 9, 2013
As with any market, prices cannot keep rising indefinitely. Soon consumers will no longer be able to afford services, no matter how much they need them. We may be reaching this limit.

Whatever the reasons for the recent slow growth of health care costs, they are still too high. We should be talking about reducing them”not just slowing their growth. To do this we need to curb the excessive demand for health care services.

Supply side solutions have proven ineffective at reducing costs because health care is a supply driven industry. The more accessible we make it, the more consumers will use it so they feel like they are getting their money's worth from their insurance.

To reduce the demand, we need to address the stress epidemic in this country. According the WHO, stress is the #1 health problem in the U.S. Some employers are realizing this and are providing their workforce with training on how to cope with stress through the practice mindfulness. Some of them have succeeded in keeping their health care costs flat.

Hundreds of studies confirm the health benefits of mindfulness, especially on overcoming stress. In addition, mindfulness training is quite cost effective. A recent Kaiser Permanente study showed that a health and wellness program enhanced with a mind-body intervention can achieve cost savings of $10 for every $1 spent. I think this is a pretty good return on investment. Wouldn't you agree?

Charles A. Francis
Author of Mindfulness in the Workplace
http://www.MindfulnessMeditationInstitute.org
twinmom

Gladys, VA

#12 Jan 10, 2013
It is not just health care policies that need to be addressed, but health care ATTITUDES.
1. The idea that if something goes wrong, or someone dies, that it must be someone's fault. Too many people are ready to sue when their 85 yo chronically ill loved one doesn't do well after surgery, when the problem is really that the body is simply old and worn out.
2. Just because you can do something, you SHOULD do something, eg, large inoperable tumor treated with high-end chemo that has miniscule chance of responding.
3. The idea that the medical profession can fix everything that has been caused by years of smoking, drinking, doing drugs, ignoring your high blood pressure and diabetes. The patient needs to take responsibility for their own health. If you take your violin and bang it around for 30 years, don't expect it to sound like a Stradivarius anymore.
4. Stop believing that "free" care is free. The pt may not have to pay the bill for their services, but somebody has to pay for the bandages, the thermometers, the medical facilities, nurses' salaries, etc etc. "Free care" just means that somebody else is paying for it. Either the hospital charges more to the people who have insurance, or the taxpayer foots the bill if the government offers free care. Either way, somebody is paying for it.
5. Now that we are adding 30 million more people to Medicaid to get "free care" recognize that there is going to be a logjam to get care. If your average primary care doctor follows 2,000 patients (which is a tremendous number), that would require 15,000 additional primary care providers, plus other specialists and ancillary care providers. Medical schools can only crank out so many new MDs each year, and the teaching hospitals only have so many residency slots. Also keep in mind, that making care "free" to the patient will only increase utilization, the same as if a restaurant gave out free meals, you would be there every day.

The biggest and most effective POLICY change that could be made to solve our "healthcare crisis" would be to pass legislation that required Congress and the White House to participate in the same healthcare system as everyone else. If your senators, representatives and the president and staff were forced to have Obamacare, Medicare or Medicaid, they would fix all that is wrong with it in a heartbeat. But they pass legislation and rules for all of us, then exempt themselves from it. And that is the biggest problem of all.

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