How To Regulate Geo-Engineering Efforts To Fight Climate Change?

Jan 5, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: MediLexicon

With policymakers and political leaders increasingly unable to combat global climate change, more scientists are considering the use of manual manipulation of the environment to slow warming's damage to the planet.

Comments
1 - 9 of 9 Comments Last updated Jan 22, 2013
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#1
Jan 6, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Unfortunately, the scientists will not be in charge of geoengineering. The major determininant will be profits to corporations and lobbyists.

And the 'game' that will change will be political.
PHD

Overton, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2
Jan 9, 2013
 

Judged:

2

1

1

And the scientist will only offer opinion.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#3
Jan 14, 2013
 
PHD wrote:
And the scientist will only offer opinion.
They will offer the best understanding of the way the natural world works. And thus, the facts to produce real cost versus benefit. But, as I pointed out, the companies that will get the contract are profit driven. And effective action is usually not profitable. These are the same companies that have CAUSED most of the problems by disregarding the effect of their 'externalized costs' and which now see a way to make even their 'collateral damage' profitable.
PHD

Overton, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#4
Jan 14, 2013
 

Judged:

2

1

1

LessHypeMoreFact wrote:
<quoted text>
They will offer the best understanding of the way the natural world works. And thus, the facts to produce real cost versus benefit. But, as I pointed out, the companies that will get the contract are profit driven. And effective action is usually not profitable. These are the same companies that have CAUSED most of the problems by disregarding the effect of their 'externalized costs' and which now see a way to make even their 'collateral damage' profitable.
One exception, they offer a best understanding in their opinion some facts. Well they do have an out they make corrections to errors to find their corrections are in error in their opinion.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5
Jan 21, 2013
 

Judged:

2

2

2

PHD wrote:
<quoted text>One exception, they offer a best understanding in their opinion some facts. Well they do have an out they make corrections to errors to find their corrections are in error in their opinion.
Unintelligible. Typical.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#6
Jan 21, 2013
 
This is actually a great article.

Carlson says the concept of geo-engineering goes back to at least the 19th century, when scientists proposed seeding clouds to increase rainfall. Today, scientists have a long list of geo-engineering ideas that could be used to slow the impact of global warming while other methods are developed to actually mitigate the damage. Some ideas are simple and locally focused, such as planting new forests to absorb carbon dioxide, or painting roofs and paved areas white to reduce solar heat absorption.

Others are more complex and controversial - manually cooling oceans so carbon dioxide-laden water sinks to the bottom more quickly; building space-based shields and mirrors to deflect solar heat from the planet; or injecting chemicals like hydrogen sulfide or sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere, creating an aerosol shield that reduces the amount of solar heat reaching the earth's surface.

But Carlson says geo-engineering comes with obvious international legal implications because no one country can implement its own geo-engineering plan without causing weather or climate changes in other countries. There's also the law of unintended consequences, because while many geo-engineering concepts have proved hopeful in the lab, nobody knows what will happen when actually put into practice. For instance, Carlson says that while manually cooling the ocean may be seen as a generally good idea, what impact will that have on farmers in India whose crops depend on rain from heat-induced tropical monsoons?

To address these issues, Carlson urges the creation of an international governing body separate from any existing organization that approves or rejects geo-engineering plans, taking into consideration the best interests of people and countries around the world. He says any legal regimen involving geo-engineering activities should require they be publicly announced in the planning stage, and all countries are notified so they have a voice in deliberations.

He wants to use the IMF to help fund it.
PHD

Overton, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#7
Jan 22, 2013
 

Judged:

2

2

2

Wallop10 wrote:
This is actually a great article.
Carlson says the concept of geo-engineering goes back to at least the 19th century, when scientists proposed seeding clouds to increase rainfall. Today, scientists have a long list of geo-engineering ideas that could be used to slow the impact of global warming while other methods are developed to actually mitigate the damage. Some ideas are simple and locally focused, such as planting new forests to absorb carbon dioxide, or painting roofs and paved areas white to reduce solar heat absorption.
Others are more complex and controversial - manually cooling oceans so carbon dioxide-laden water sinks to the bottom more quickly; building space-based shields and mirrors to deflect solar heat from the planet; or injecting chemicals like hydrogen sulfide or sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere, creating an aerosol shield that reduces the amount of solar heat reaching the earth's surface.
But Carlson says geo-engineering comes with obvious international legal implications because no one country can implement its own geo-engineering plan without causing weather or climate changes in other countries. There's also the law of unintended consequences, because while many geo-engineering concepts have proved hopeful in the lab, nobody knows what will happen when actually put into practice. For instance, Carlson says that while manually cooling the ocean may be seen as a generally good idea, what impact will that have on farmers in India whose crops depend on rain from heat-induced tropical monsoons?
To address these issues, Carlson urges the creation of an international governing body separate from any existing organization that approves or rejects geo-engineering plans, taking into consideration the best interests of people and countries around the world. He says any legal regimen involving geo-engineering activities should require they be publicly announced in the planning stage, and all countries are notified so they have a voice in deliberations.
He wants to use the IMF to help fund it.
More useless babble scientific science fiction.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#8
Jan 22, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Wallop10 wrote:
This is actually a great article.
Carlson says the concept of geo-engineering goes back to at least the 19th century,
The main problem with geo-engineering ideas is that the effect are NOT contained to one country. And international cooperation in environmental factors such as AGW is very low (as with many other areas), so getting a common agreement on ANY plan will be fraught with difficulty. Increase rainfall over your deserts and you will also decrease rainfall elsewhere, for example. So countries do not agree and stay with 'the status quo' as a default. Inaction is much easier than action when ANY risk is involved. Even when it is stupid.
PHD

Overton, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#9
Jan 22, 2013
 

Judged:

2

1

1

Yes more scientific science fiction predictions or they just have opinions.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Other Recent University of Iowa Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Feds test how stoned is too stoned to drive Jul 26 T Turner 1
IA Court Throws Out Discipline Against U. Iowa ... (Apr '13) Jun '14 TOM DRAKE for Prez 22
University of Iowa Broadcasts Graduation Ceremo... May '14 Pete Trautman 1
About Town: Feaster Hands Keys to Stoughton's N... (Dec '12) May '14 Kundrot dionkie 12
Black Harvard students take to Tumblr in fight ... Mar '14 guest 31
Penis art exhibit raises eyebrows (Sep '11) Feb '14 running wild 2
Does having kids make you happy? (May '11) Jan '14 Inge 5

Search the University of Iowa Forum:
•••