More Alabama students taking college test prep classes

Full story: The Montgomery Advertiser

Muscle Shoals High School senior Celena Spurgeon said she never worried too much about getting a good score on her ACT college entrance test until her junior year when she realized how competitive it is to receive a scholarship.

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anon

Tupelo, MS

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#1
Nov 13, 2012
 
Teach to the test is the last thing you want to spend your valuable time on. Many schools are waving entrance exam requirements. Colleges just want your money.
Will

Allentown, PA

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#2
Nov 13, 2012
 
Not the good schools.
anon

Tupelo, MS

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#3
Nov 13, 2012
 
•American University
•Arizona State University at Tempe
•Arkansas State University
•Austin Peay State University
•Bard College
•Bates College
•Bennington College
•Bowdoin College
•California State University at Bakersfield, Chico, Dominguez Hills, East Bay, Fresno, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Monterey Bay, Northridge, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Marcos, and Stanislaus
•College of the Atlantic
•College of the Holy Cross
•Connecticut College
•Denison University
•DePaul University
•Dickinson College
•Drew University
•East Tennessee State University
•Eastern Kentucky University
•Fairfield University
•Franklin and Marshall College
•Furman University
•George Mason University
•Gettysburg College
•Goddard College
•Goucher College
•Guilford College
•Gustavus Adolphus College
•Hampshire College
•Hobart and William Smith Colleges
•Illinois College
•Indiana State University
•Juniata College
•Kansas State University (scores required for out-of-state applicants)
•Knox College
•Lake Forest College
•Lawrence University
•Lewis & Clark College
•Loyola College in Maryland
•Marist College
•Middle Tennessee State University
•Middlebury College (SAT2 required if SAT1 is not used)
•Minnesota State University
•Mount Holyoke College
•Muhlenberg College
•Nazareth College
•New School (scores required for some programs)
•Northern Arizona University
•Ohio State University at ATI Wooster, Mansfield, Marion, Newark (scores required for out-of-state applicants)
•Oklahoma State University, Stillwater
•Pitzer College
•Providence College
•Robert Morris University
•Rollins College
•St. John's College (Annapolis and Sante Fe)
•Sarah Lawrence College
•Sewanee: The University of the South
•Smith College
•South Dakota State University
•State University of New York at Potsdam
•Stetson University
•Stonehill College
•Susquehanna University
•Union College
•University of Alaska at Anchorage, Fairbanks and Southeast
•University of Arizona
•University of Arkansas at Fortsmith, Little Rock, Monticello and Pine Bluff
•University of Idaho at Moscow
•University of Kansas at Lawrence
•University of Maine at Augusta, Farmington, Ft. Kent and Presque Isle
•University of Minnesota at Crookston, Duluth and Morris
•University of Mississippi
•University of Montana at Missoula and Western
•University of Nebraska at Kearney and Lincoln
•University of Nevada at Las Vegas and Reno
•University of Texas at Arlington, Brownsville, Dallas, El Paso, Pan American, San Antonio and Tyler
•Ursinus College
•Wake Forest University
•Washington College
•Washington and Jefferson College
•Western Kentucky University
•Wheaton College (MA)
•Wittenberg University
•Whitworth University
•Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI)
MaltaMon

Wilmington, DE

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#4
Nov 16, 2012
 
That is a tiny percentage of the 3000 colleges and universities in the United States, and it doesn't include any Ivy League schools--just a very few of those who compete with them. And this is a list of institutions that no longer require the SAT Subject Tests--not the Reasoning Test. Moreover, it is quite a few years out of date.(Note the reference to "SAT 1" and "SAT 2"... terms which have not been used since the early part of the last decade. And the ACT is not mentioned at all.
anon

Tupelo, MS

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#5
Nov 16, 2012
 
Tests do not test ability, they only separate children based on a cultural bias and bell curve. Just as coaching can change scores. Also transfer students do not submit test scores. Ivy League schools offer the advantage of rich contacts, not a better quality of life. You pay through the nose for those social connections. The students are no better equipped to master life than others.
Phils Dangly Bits

Port Carbon, PA

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#6
Nov 17, 2012
 
Half the schools you mention charge as much for tuition, fees, housing and meals as any Ivy League school. The dropping of the SUBJECT TEST (!) requirement has more to do with competition for the best students than with the utility of those exams. There is no national standard in the US for a high school diploma. Those SAT and ACT scores provide an enormously imperfect national standard, but a standard nonetheless. And they tend to be used to eliminate candidates from competition--not to boost their chances for admission. But again, your list concerns the SAT II, which for more than a decade have been known as "Subject Tests". So this one is out of date. And these are schools that years ago abandoned the reqirement of two or three hour-long SAT Subject Tests (then known as the SAT II, as I mentioned)--not the 3 and 1/2 hour SAT I now known as the SAT Reasoning Test, lengthened to four hours because of the inclusion of the 25-minute essay question, which used to be part of the SAT II English Writing test, albeit with five minutrs more to complete it now than was permitted back in the dsys of the SAT I and II, of which your list is an artifact. And please don't speak about Ivy League institutions when you seem to know very little about them . Thanks.
MaltaMon Gg

Port Carbon, PA

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#7
Nov 17, 2012
 
Phils Dangly Bits wrote:
Half the schools you mention charge as much for tuition, fees, housing and meals as any Ivy League school. The dropping of the SUBJECT TEST (!) requirement has more to do with competition for the best students than with the utility of those exams. There is no national standard in the US for a high school diploma. Those SAT and ACT scores provide an enormously imperfect national standard, but a standard nonetheless. And they tend to be used to eliminate candidates from competition--not to boost their chances for admission. But again, your list concerns the SAT II, which for more than a decade have been known as "Subject Tests". So this one is out of date. And these are schools that years ago abandoned the reqirement of two or three hour-long SAT Subject Tests (then known as the SAT II, as I mentioned)--not the 3 and 1/2 hour SAT I now known as the SAT Reasoning Test, lengthened to four hours because of the inclusion of the 25-minute essay question, which used to be part of the SAT II English Writing test, albeit with five minutrs more to complete it now than was permitted back in the dsys of the SAT I and II, of which your list is an artifact. And please don't speak about Ivy League institutions when you seem to know very little about them . Thanks.
Sorry, anon. I meant to use my usual screen name-- not the 1 I reserve for exchanges with a certain British boy lover. and hey, that is 1 hell of a run-on sentence that I include at the end of that posting. Just goes to show that you should not do this while you're driving
anon

Tupelo, MS

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#8
Nov 17, 2012
 
"And please don't speak about Ivy League institutions when you seem to know very little about them "
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I took classes at a few. The tests are not standards they are ranking based on many cultural divides. Look at those people that quit school and are doing much better than those graduates that are asking if you want fries with that. Our schools and testing do not educate they are more of a training mills for occupations that do not exist.

Quality of life should be the goal not some government standard. Many of the correct answers are based on propaganda. Quality of life is not measured on how much you consume.
MaltaMon Gg

Allentown, PA

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#9
Nov 17, 2012
 
anon wrote:
"And please don't speak about Ivy League institutions when you seem to know very little about them "
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I took classes at a few. The tests are not standards they are ranking based on many cultural divides. Look at those people that quit school and are doing much better than those graduates that are asking if you want fries with that. Our schools and testing do not educate they are more of a training mills for occupations that do not exist.
Quality of life should be the goal not some government standard. Many of the correct answers are based on propaganda. Quality of life is not measured on how much you consume.
Took classes at a fee? Hmmm... I'm a graduate of one of them and advise admissions officers. I am intimately familiar with how they select successful candidates from their applicant pools,, how they interpret and use standardized admissions exams, and the extent to which classes are open to non-matriculants.
MaltaMon Gg

Allentown, PA

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#10
Nov 17, 2012
 
*few
MaltaMon Gg

Allentown, PA

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#11
Nov 17, 2012
 
That is why your thread and initial post attracted my attention. I am a product of one of those schools, and I work with admissions officers of all eight of them, of other private colleges and universities from Colby to Colgate to Carlton, Auburn,Tufts, Rice, Miami, and, USC, and of more than two dozen public universities from Binghamton to Berkeley. I know college admissions. I don't approve of how those exams are used, don't believe they predict success in undergraduate studies (as the College Board and the ACT folks in Iowa insist), and feel strongly that it is a crutch, an lazy excuse to distinguish among similarly well qualified candidates. But that is what they do with them.. And reliance upon them is, in fact, on the rise these days. Your info is out of date.
anon

Tupelo, MS

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#12
Nov 17, 2012
 
"Your info is out of date."
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So is the American education system. It has failed in the last 20 years and is getting worse as it has become an industry to turn out widgets.

It is not worth the price of admissions. Success is in innovation not standardization.
Phils Dangly Bits

Philadelphia, PA

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#13
Nov 17, 2012
 
anon wrote:
"Your info is out of date."
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So is the American education system. It has failed in the last 20 years and is getting worse as it has become an industry to turn out widgets.
It is not worth the price of admissions. Success is in innovation not standardization.
I agree in principle. But the problem is that it's going the other way these days. At every level, including post-Baccalaureate study.
anon

Tupelo, MS

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#14
Nov 17, 2012
 
The pursuit of a doctorate—a sometimes decade-long, low-wage quest that may or may not end with a faculty job—has been under more critical scrutiny than ever this year. Why does it take so long to earn a Ph.D.?(Recipients are age 34, on average.) Why do we produce so many Ph.D.'s when fewer than half of them will ever hold tenure-track jobs? Is this 19th-century German model of apprenticeship suited to the 21st century?
Phils Dangly Bits

Philadelphia, PA

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#15
Nov 17, 2012
 
No. But the problem comes from a reduction of available tenure-track positions since the 1970s, due to (1) an abundance of Ph.D.s that were a by-product of the draft (which, until 1968, could be avoided by remaining in school)... so until recently, there was tenure gridlock owing to the fact that many of these Boomer scholars were awarded tenure in the '70s and '80s. They only recently have begun the slow process of retirement. (2) a deliberate reduction in the overall number of tenured positions (other than endowed chairs, which are the results of philanthropy) to save an institution money over time (because salaries increased dramatically since 1980... a practice that Boston University's John Silber began to do with lateral appointments of top scholars raided from faculties throughout the world.. money was the key enticement.. salaries of tenured professors have broken the bank and explain in part the otherwise unjustifiable annual spikes in tuition rates), and (3) the increased reliance (again for financial reasons) upon part-time instructors and graduate assistants, who come much less expensively to the classroom. Subsistence-level wages, no benefits to speak of, annual contracts of which renewal is never guaranteed... Taken together, this has enabled the proliferation of administrative positions. And the overall reduction in tenured positions will continue with atrition: many current tenured faculty will not be replaced by tenure-track hires. Money is the reason.
Phils Dangly Bits

Philadelphia, PA

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#16
Nov 17, 2012
 
Meanwhile, there is no reduction in the number of PhD candidates. They are inexpensive teachers (see above) and, with the job situation, those who can afford to remain in school will elect to do so. So the situation will only grow worse at the other end. You will find more an more PhDs than ever before on the faculties of independent secondary schools, teaching 11-18 year-olds.
anon

Tupelo, MS

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#17
Nov 18, 2012
 
"The Last Professors, The corporate University and the Fate of The Humanities"

by Frank Donoghue

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