Under a No Childa Law, Even Solid Schools Falter

Oct 12, 2008 | Posted by: Mr_Bill | Full story: www.nytimes.com

Prairie Elementary School had not missed a testing target since the federal No Child Left Behind law took effect in 2002.

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Since: Mar 08

Santa Fe, TN

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#1
Oct 12, 2008
 

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Childa?

Since: Oct 07

citizenactionny.org

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#2
Oct 13, 2008
 

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Under the No Child Left Behind Act we have fallen behind many countries in the education of our children. In my opinion, our children should not have to pay for anything except "school supplies",(notebooks, pens, pencils, books etcetera), all the way through college. Leaving school, starting your career, "behind the 8 ball" of debt known as student loans is very stressing and leads to bad decision making.

Since: Mar 08

Santa Fe, TN

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Oct 13, 2008
 

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Thomas Aldrich wrote:
Under the No Child Left Behind Act we have fallen behind many countries in the education of our children. In my opinion, our children should not have to pay for anything except "school supplies",(notebooks, pens, pencils, books etcetera), all the way through college. Leaving school, starting your career, "behind the 8 ball" of debt known as student loans is very stressing and leads to bad decision making.
N. Korea and Poland High School students do better on international high School tests than US High School students.

N. Korea was just recently taken off the list as a terror nation then put back on then taken off again and probably will be put back on again later so it's really embarrassing that high school students of a nation on the terror list are better educated than our students.

Since: Jul 07

United States

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#4
Oct 13, 2008
 

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Did anyone seriously think George could do anything but unfunded ignorance? This man and his programs reflect a total incompetency and ineptness that never fails to amaze anyone but the ignorant.

“WOOH!!”

Since: May 08

Vallejo, CA

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#5
Oct 13, 2008
 

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Education has taken a back seat to teaching kids how to take tests.

The time and money could be better spent on teaching them things like how to properly fill out a job application.

Since: Oct 08

United States

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#6
Oct 14, 2008
 

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In Real Time wrote:
Childa?
That wasn't on the standardized testing...

hehe

“Desert Primrose”

Since: Oct 07

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Oct 14, 2008
 

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I've said it, before, but it bears repeating ... so long as funding for schools is dependent upon the number of kids warming chairs, Districts are NOT going to be eager to see the kids move forward at a pace suited to that student's needs if it means the student might leave school before the age of eighteen.

Special education needs to be geared for kids of normal or above-normal intelligence, not kids who are academically compromised. And, the monies spent need to be spent more efficiently than they are. Right now, many Districts do not even have the basics in place.

PHONICS should be in EVERY class room until the third grade, and in EVERY Special Education class room. It's not there.

Spelling needs to remain a priority, kids preference and texting not-withstanding. Whether the kids are headed to college, or to flippin' burgers, they are going to need to read and write.
And spell. One can tell a good deal about the educational level by the manner in which one expresses ones'self. As computer communications become a higher priority, so good spelling becomes an essential.

continued...

“Desert Primrose”

Since: Oct 07

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Oct 14, 2008
 

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Education on all levels need more flexibility, but that requires a lot of other things --

First and foremost, the money spent on education needs to be spent in the CLASS ROOM, and not on bureaucracy. Teachers, teachers assistants, books, and other educational aids to offer the more flexible teaching methods so essential to the special education student.

Second : parents and kids need to work together to get these kids through school. Too many parents were unmotivated students, themselves, and see no reason to rehash those failures, leaving their kids to that same disappointment.

Third. Kids need to see the relevancy in their education. Right now, teachers are compelled to teach to the test. This does not provide our kids the breadth/depth of education required to produce a productive Citizen.

Fourth. Not every student is headed for College. We need more options available for kids who have no interest in or no inclination toward post-Secondary education.

Fifth. Plenty of support for those same teachers, and find SOME way to reduce the amount of paper work required (for "accountability") to allow the teacher more time to do what s/he loves -- teach. Right now, teachers are required to spend more time doing the paper work than they spend in the class room. And, they don't even have the excuse of dyslexia. It is absurd!

continued...

“Desert Primrose”

Since: Oct 07

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Oct 14, 2008
 

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Teachers are wonderful people, most try their best with the limited resources they have, but, unfortunately, too much of the educational dollar is spent OUTSIDE the class room.

Priorities need to be Ė

1) safe physical plant/maintenence
(secure school campuses Ė Pre- to HS)
(Kids canít learn if the walls are falling, the windows are broken and the toilets donítí work)(Or, theyíre afraid of the student or non-student with a gun as a result of an inadequately secured campus)

2) an adequate teacher/student ratio
(In a main-stream elementary class room, twenty kids to one teacher/assistant is barely acceptable, in my opinion. In Special Education, anything over fifteen/one is going to be inadequate. The best programs, for the most compromised kids, run about seven/one, or even, five/one. But, there arenít enough of them to meet the need.)

3) books and other educational materials

4) bureaucracy

I suspect we could remove the most ineffective 30% of the bureaucrats (the obstructionists and chair-warmers ó we all know who they are!) in ANY bureaucracy, and reassign their most effective underlings to those bureaucrats remaining on the same level, to achieve a much more effective, cohesive product (in this case, the Ďproductí is a studentís education). The resulting savings could then be channelled in a more appropriate direction.

We, as a Society and a Nation, need to see this deliberate negligence of our most valuable resource change. Sadly, I donít see that happening any time soon.

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