Quitting Even Tougher When Smokers Battle Other Addictions

Aug 26, 2011 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: HON

Four out of every 10 smokers is also burdened with alcohol or drug addictions, or mental health disorders, and getting them to quit cigarettes can be a big challenge.

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1 - 3 of 3 Comments Last updated Aug 27, 2011
Village Mystery

Huntsville, AL

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#1
Aug 27, 2011
 
I love that summary. If only the mentally disturbed people addicted to crystal meth could put those damn cigarettes down.
Hugh Jass

Nashville, TN

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#2
Aug 27, 2011
 
Village Mystery wrote:
I love that summary. If only the mentally disturbed people addicted to crystal meth could put those damn cigarettes down.
I love your apparent belief that you are rational.
Hugh Jass

Nashville, TN

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#3
Aug 27, 2011
 
The first thing that struck me as odd about this article was that, according to other sources (including at least one article/thread on this forum), 40% of smokers have been diagnosed with mental illness. This piece opens by adding in those who have other substance abuse issues and saying the total is "four in ten".

Then, thinking it was only revisiting another recent post regarding smoking regulations in clinics treating other addictions, I looked at the article itself.

Now, what strikes me as odd--even bizarre--is the angle taken in the title. The article is not about the differences between smokers with/without other substance abuse problems--though that is mentioned--it is about the helpfulness of smoking-cessation counseling from a primary care giver.

If anything, the article/study suggests that other substance abuse problems are not the huge hindrance they are made out to be in smoking cessation, making the title ridiculous. I see that the linked article actually includes the true slant as a subtitle, in much smaller font.

More, despite the inclusion of the mentally ill (probably a huge portion of the "four in ten" addressed) with those who abuse other substances, the final quote in the article refers only to opium addiction. It would be informative to know the demographics of the group as a whole and of the subset of the group who are able to quit with counseling. Are the smokers with other drug addictions represented proportionally in each of those two groups, or does the inclusion of those with mental illness mask a comparative futility of providing counseling to those with other addictions?

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