Alarming Increase in Flow of Water In...

Alarming Increase in Flow of Water Into Oceans

There are 41 comments on the Science Daily story from Oct 5, 2010, titled Alarming Increase in Flow of Water Into Oceans. In it, Science Daily reports that:

Alarming Increase in Flow of Water Into Oceans Due to Global Warming, Accelerated Cycle of Evaporation, Precipitation ScienceDaily - Freshwater is flowing into Earth's oceans in greater amounts every year, a team of researchers has found, thanks to more frequent and extreme storms linked to global warming.

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Earthling

Valencia, Spain

#1 Oct 5, 2010
"Alarming Increase in Flow of Water Into Oceans Due to Global Warming"
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Yes, of course it's due to global warming and of course it must be, "alarming" to discover that more precipitation causes rivers to flow faster and harder.
This will undoubtedly cause even more drought.
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NB: I thought I'd beat LessFact to the punch with this one.
The Carpet Whisperer

United States

#2 Oct 5, 2010
Drought, created by more storms seems wrong, but perhaps you can show why??? I would think thge reverse is probable.
Earthling

Valencia, Spain

#3 Oct 5, 2010
The Carpet Whisperer, my remark about droughts was facetious, the alarmists out there will understand.

I'm with you, the reverse is more likely.
LessHypeMoreFact

Woodstock, Canada

#4 Oct 5, 2010
The Carpet Whisperer wrote:
Drought, created by more storms seems wrong, but perhaps you can show why??? I would think thge reverse is probable.
What makes you think that the earth is one uniform ball with exactly the same rain in all areas??

And why would the changes not follow the same 'pattern' since areas with good rain will have the conditions to promote more rain from higher evaporation and areas with little rain will probably be blocked from increased evaporation by those same conditions (with higher evaporation of ground water)

Fact is that this story is just confirmation of the one 'forecast' for more and more extreme storms and floods in areas with good rainfall ( or periodic flooding) but does not address the increases in drought in drought prone areas ( though other papers do).

P.S. Ignore Dirtling. He talks through is anus.
The Carpet Whisperer

United States

#5 Oct 5, 2010
Earthling wrote:
The Carpet Whisperer, my remark about droughts was facetious, the alarmists out there will understand.
I'm with you, the reverse is more likely.
Thanks for letting me know. Have a great day.
neighbour

Okotoks, Canada

#6 Oct 5, 2010
Earthling wrote:
The Carpet Whisperer, my remark about droughts was facetious, the alarmists out there will understand.
I'm with you, the reverse is more likely.
You didn't think that through. How could it be likely for regional rainstorms to reduce the global incidence of drought??
If storms drop more rainfall in concentrated areas, there will be less available in other areas.

Or to think of it in regional terms, if the Westerly air mass drops more rain than usual in British Columbia, say, then Alberta will likely be drier than usual.
Northie

Spokane, WA

#7 Oct 5, 2010
The Carpet Whisperer wrote:
Drought, created by more storms seems wrong, but perhaps you can show why??? I would think thge reverse is probable.
Increased snowmelt, not just storms, accounts for a lot of this extra runoff. Yet both drought and floods are indeed becoming much more severe--just in different places.

A warmer climate adds energy to a closed system. That creates more chaotic, more intense extremes in every way.
particularlynast yweather

Durrington, UK

#8 Oct 5, 2010
Northie wrote:
<quoted text>
Increased snowmelt, not just storms, accounts for a lot of this extra runoff. Yet both drought and floods are indeed becoming much more severe--just in different places.
A warmer climate adds energy to a closed system. That creates more chaotic, more intense extremes in every way.
so! you have worked out that more rain makes the rivers have more water in them. perhaps if you stopped predicting droughts all this rain would stop.
The Carpet Whisperer

United States

#9 Oct 5, 2010
For me, more raqin begets more rain and less rain begets less rain. Water vapor.
Northie

Spokane, WA

#10 Oct 5, 2010
The Carpet Whisperer wrote:
For me, more raqin begets more rain and less rain begets less rain. Water vapor.
Yeah, as the article says, the main point is that the evaporation cycle is dramatically accelerating. The effects are different everywhere. Here in the US West, it means more intense winter floods as well as more intense summer drought, with the drought carrying the day. In Pakistan, it means winter drought and summer floods, with the floods turning epic.
Earthling

Valencia, Spain

#11 Oct 6, 2010
neighbour wrote:
You didn't think that through.
Probably not, but at least I don't do what you do in the following.
neighbour wrote:
How could it be likely for regional rainstorms to reduce the global incidence of drought??
Where did I write, "regional?"
neighbour wrote:
If storms drop more rainfall in concentrated areas
"If."
neighbour wrote:
there will be less available in other areas.
Are you sure?
neighbour wrote:
Or to think of it in regional terms
Why?
neighbour wrote:
if the Westerly air mass drops more rain than usual in British Columbia, say
"If."
neighbour wrote:
then Alberta will likely be drier than usual.
"Will" or may be?
neighbour

Okotoks, Canada

#12 Oct 6, 2010
Earthling, your above post is pretty lame. Just as a start, the conversation was to do with storms. Storms are regional. You didn't need to say it, they just are. I kind of expected that you knew that.

Storms do drop their rainfall in concentrated areas. I would have expected you to know that, too.

The rest of your objections are just childish, without any sensible meaning at all.

I know you're a self centred prig, but you're not stupid. You should really leave the meaningless dumba$$ posts to your cohorts.
Fun Facts

AOL

#13 Oct 6, 2010
Solar activity is decreasing. As the magnetic activity of the sun decreases the sun's heliosphere is reduced. The heliosphere protects the solar system from cosmic rays, just as the earth's magnetic field protects the earth from solar activity.

The protection provided by the sun's heliosphere is reduced with the lower magnetic activity. The earth's protection from solar activity is reduced as our magnetic field diminishes. The earth's mag field has been declining for the last 150 years. Coincidently the same amount of time that temps have been increasing.

As a result more cosmic rays impact the earth's atmosphere. More cosmic rays, more clouds. During the warm periods that means more rain fall as temps drop less moisture in the air results is less rain fall.
Glasnos

El Paso, TX

#14 Oct 6, 2010
Oh Lord ... is there nothing they can't blame on the fictitious "global warming"? According to Gore Florida should be under water by now.
When there is a draught, they blame global warming ... when there is a flood ... global warming ... when it is unusually cold ... global warming ... Want to see who believes in global warming?
http://directorblue.blogspot.com/2010/10/15-p...
Glasnos

El Paso, TX

#15 Oct 6, 2010
Fun Facts wrote:
Solar activity is decreasing. As the magnetic activity of the sun decreases the sun's heliosphere is reduced. The heliosphere protects the solar system from cosmic rays, just as the earth's magnetic field protects the earth from solar activity.
The protection provided by the sun's heliosphere is reduced with the lower magnetic activity. The earth's protection from solar activity is reduced as our magnetic field diminishes. The earth's mag field has been declining for the last 150 years. Coincidently the same amount of time that temps have been increasing.
As a result more cosmic rays impact the earth's atmosphere. More cosmic rays, more clouds. During the warm periods that means more rain fall as temps drop less moisture in the air results is less rain fall.
You are on to something... The earth's magnetic field has decreased 10% the last 100 years. The magnetic north pole has been moving at ever increasing speed toward Siberia ... now up to 60 km per year, Just ten years ago it was moving at 40 km per year. There is something changing in the current of earth's molten core(which produces the earth's magnetic field) All the climate changes, the increasing earthquake activity and slight increase in ocean temperatures(which in turn releases more CO2) can all be explained by this one natural phenomena.
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-...
Earthling

Valencia, Spain

#16 Oct 6, 2010
neighbour wrote:
Storms are regional.
Really?
neighbour wrote:
Storms do drop their rainfall in concentrated areas.
Really?
Earthling

Valencia, Spain

#17 Oct 6, 2010
Fun Facts wrote:
Solar activity is decreasing. As the magnetic activity of the Sun decreases the Sun's heliosphere is reduced. The heliosphere protects the solar system from cosmic rays, just as the earth's magnetic field protects the earth from solar activity.
The protection provided by the Sun's heliosphere is reduced with the lower magnetic activity. The earth's protection from solar activity is reduced as our magnetic field diminishes. The earth's mag field has been declining for the last 150 years. Coincidently the same amount of time that temps have been increasing.
As a result more cosmic rays impact the earth's atmosphere. More cosmic rays, more clouds. During the warm periods that means more rain fall as temps drop less moisture in the air results is less rain fall.
The first problem with this science, it isn't mainstream.
The second problem, it appears that climatologists aren't interested in it.
The third problem, alarmists aren't interested in anything that doesn't involve CO2 mitigation, more taxes and a future catastrophe.
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It boils down to the fact that what you suggest, cannot be blamed on humans and as you know well, humans need someone to blame for anything and everything that goes wrong on this planet.
As it was in the beginning so shall it be in the end.
Northie

Spokane, WA

#18 Oct 6, 2010
Fun Facts, Glasnos,

Without doubt the Earth's magnetic harmonies are entirely at fault for all this warming. Yet have you also considered the possible buildup of psychic energy as a possible cause, or is that only responsible for the acceleration of vampirism?
Earthling

Valencia, Spain

#19 Oct 6, 2010
Garlic fronds have always worked for me, never been bitten by a vampire yet.
I always carry a wooden stake and a mallet, just in case.
I have a single shot pistol loaded with a silver bullet for werewolves as well.
Glasnos

El Paso, TX

#20 Oct 6, 2010
Northie wrote:
Fun Facts, Glasnos,
Without doubt the Earth's magnetic harmonies are entirely at fault for all this warming. Yet have you also considered the possible buildup of psychic energy as a possible cause, or is that only responsible for the acceleration of vampirism?
Yeah ... show your ignorance ... but while you wring your hands and fret about rising oceans and watch with twitching body at Bruce Willis blowing up a meteor urling toward earth ... you are completely oblivious to a very real threat. We have had many electircal outages from CME bursts from the sun. If we should get one like the one that hit in 1859, it would take out most if not all electric grids world wide. Think what that would mean ... no electric power anywhere .. for years ... because it would take a very long time to replace massive transformers when no one has any power. A relatively small CME burst took out the entire electric gid in Quebec in 1989.
On September 1, 1859, the Sun let loose a Coronal Mass Ejection of impressive size. How impressive?
Just before dawn the next day, skies all over planet Earth erupted in red, green, and purple auroras so brilliant that newspapers could be read as easily as in daylight. Indeed, stunning auroras pulsated even at near tropical latitudes over Cuba, the Bahamas, Jamaica, El Salvador, and Hawaii.
Even more disconcerting, telegraph systems worldwide went haywire. Spark discharges shocked telegraph operators and set the telegraph paper on fire. Even when telegraphers disconnected the batteries powering the lines, aurora-induced electric currents in the wires still allowed messages to be transmitted.


http://www.mi2g.com/cgi/mi2g/frameset.php...

Unlike the progressive fantasies ... this is real ... could you, and your whole city, survive without electricity for a year?
Just the loss of cellphones would be enough to drive all the teenagers cmpletely crazy.

We are now entering into a phase of increased solar activity after a long lull.... still laughing?

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