Climate change poses risks to food, b...

Climate change poses risks to food, beyond U.S. drought

There are 19 comments on the Reuters story from Aug 16, 2012, titled Climate change poses risks to food, beyond U.S. drought. In it, Reuters reports that:

Downpours and heatwaves caused by climate change could disrupt food supplies from the fields to the supermarkets, raising the risk of more price spikes such as this year's leap triggered by drought in the United States.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Reuters.

SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

#1 Aug 16, 2012
People "should take more account of how extremes of heat, droughts or floods could affect food supplies from seeds to consumers' plates."

A shift towards more vegetarian diets would help now because the world still has three goals of producing (1) food for people,(2) crops for biofuels, and (3) feed for animals, raised for their meat.

“I Luv Carbon Dioxide”

Since: Dec 08

Home, sweet home.

#2 Aug 16, 2012
Biofuels take valuable land, labor and resources away from food production. I oppose biofuel because it increases food prices and starves the poor.
Instead of becoming vegetarian, consider voting for a conservative who will move our economy away from centrally planned starvation.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

#3 Aug 16, 2012
1. reduce our personal carbon footprint by 20 percent in the next year.

2. stop subsidizing fossil fuels.

3. vote for Obama/Biden.

4. shift towards more vegetarian diets.

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain retreat, SE Spain

#4 Aug 17, 2012
Spambrat wrote:
reduce[sic] our personal carbon footprint by 20 percent in the next year.
20% won't be nearly enough to reach the target proposed by your masters, make it 80% or bust.
BTW, you'd have to reduce your CF a lot more than 20% to get close to mine.
Northie

Spokane, WA

#5 Aug 17, 2012
SpaceBlues wrote:
People "should take more account of how extremes of heat, droughts or floods could affect food supplies from seeds to consumers' plates."
A shift towards more vegetarian diets would help now because the world still has three goals of producing (1) food for people,(2) crops for biofuels, and (3) feed for animals, raised for their meat.
Well, last time I was in Houston you could probably fit its vegetarians into one aisle at Whole Foods. Up here in the Mountain West, Spokane, Boise, Denver each seem to feature enough "gourmet burger" joints and steakhouses to keep the American Heart Association in business. Beef and pork consumption is rising like crazy abroad, in emerging markets. We all like meat.

I'd take it one step at a time. Promote meatless Mondays, a switch from beef to chicken and fish, better substitutes. Pushing a "vegetarian" diet just inspires push-back.

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain retreat, SE Spain

#6 Aug 18, 2012
Nauseous wrote:
Promote meatless Mondays, a switch from beef to chicken and fish, better substitutes.
Why not have one meat free day a week?
On average, I eat beef about once a month.
Nauseous wrote:
Pushing a "vegetarian" diet just inspires push-back.
Check your teeth.
Fangs ain't what they used to be.

Were Humans Meant to Eat Meat?
http://rense.com/general20/meant.htm
PHD

Houston, TX

#7 Aug 18, 2012
Earthling-1 wrote:
<quoted text>Why not have one meat free day a week?
On average, I eat beef about once a month.<quoted text>Check your teeth.
Fangs ain't what they used to be.
Were Humans Meant to Eat Meat?
http://rense.com/general20/meant.htm
More of the same hate babble. Answer the questions one day a month or humans meant to eat meat? Hay try a real answer not the cut and paste babble you spew.
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#8 Aug 18, 2012
Earthling-1 wrote:
<quoted text>Why not have one meat free day a week?
On average, I eat beef about once a month.<quoted text>Check your teeth.
Fangs ain't what they used to be.
Were Humans Meant to Eat Meat?
http://rense.com/general20/meant.htm
Not me, I eat beef a few times a week, the portions have changed over time and the side dishes are more 'healthy' but the meat/poultry/fish is still there. Putting a steak on the grill is still a favorite.

I live in an area where the 'regional native' foods have many 'meat free' options, pinto beans are the main source of protein in those dishes, so variety exists, and variety is the spice of life.
litesong

Lynnwood, WA

#9 Aug 18, 2012
SpaceBlues wrote:
1. reduce our personal carbon footprint by 20 percent in the next year.
2. stop subsidizing fossil fuels.
3. vote for Obama/Biden.
4. shift towards more vegetarian diets.
In addition to your point number 2, with the end of the ethanol subsidy, also end the ever increasing percentage ethanol requirement in our nation's fuel stocks. MPG will go up ~5-10%, more in some cases(?) using 100% pure(ethanol-free) gasoline.

Check number 3.

check number 4. Trying to get more vegetarian meals! I love a good steak, tho. Served a wonderful large steak at our favorite Italian & Greek restaurant, I take much of it home & get another 2 meals out of it(3 meals, twice)! Yeah, those steaks are huge, delicious & well priced.

When we get the large split Canadian bacon & feta cheese pizza, doggy bags give me an extra 2 meals at home (eating pizza right now).

Tough reducing number 1, tho. Been getting 42+mpg for 30+ years, 46+mpg presently with small cars. Keep the temperature down at home, way down when I'm the only one at home. No a/c here. COULD drive less. But the Pacific Northwest is so beautiful, I just got to drench myself in its loveliness by traveling its ways. Hope an affordable electric car with 200mile range is around the corner. I love the elegant motion, silky smoothness & quietness of electric motors. They are thoroughly civilized.

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain retreat, SE Spain

#10 Aug 18, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
Not me, I eat beef a few times a week, the portions have changed over time and the side dishes are more 'healthy' but the meat/poultry/fish is still there. Putting a steak on the grill is still a favorite.
I live in an area where the 'regional native' foods have many 'meat free' options, pinto beans are the main source of protein in those dishes, so variety exists, and variety is the spice of life.
Yep, that's why I only eat beef about once a month.

In the 40+ years we've been together, Mrs E has collected over 46 recipe books from all around the world, plus masses of recipes from TV and the internet over the last 20 years.
She cooks Chinese, Indian, Greek, Cypriot, Thai, Turkish, German, French, Italian, Indonesian, Japanese and a few others.

Our local area is famous for Paella Valenciana (rabbit and snails), great with a bottle of Estola from La Mancha or a local Valencian wine.
Just down the road on the coast, it's seafood paella, best with a crisp white wine from the north east, chilled, of course.
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#11 Aug 19, 2012
Earthling-1 wrote:
<quoted text>Yep, that's why I only eat beef about once a month.
In the 40+ years we've been together, Mrs E has collected over 46 recipe books from all around the world, plus masses of recipes from TV and the internet over the last 20 years.
She cooks Chinese, Indian, Greek, Cypriot, Thai, Turkish, German, French, Italian, Indonesian, Japanese and a few others.
Our local area is famous for Paella Valenciana (rabbit and snails), great with a bottle of Estola from La Mancha or a local Valencian wine.
Just down the road on the coast, it's seafood paella, best with a crisp white wine from the north east, chilled, of course.
We were once a part of a group that would prepare dinners based on recpies from all over the world. Learned a lot about food prep and have continued to use many recipies with local ingredients.

Paella was one of our dinners and we still use the concepts to prepare hybrids of that wonderful dish.

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain retreat, SE Spain

#12 Aug 19, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
We were once a part of a group that would prepare dinners based on recpies from all over the world. Learned a lot about food prep and have continued to use many recipies with local ingredients.
Paella was one of our dinners and we still use the concepts to prepare hybrids of that wonderful dish.
The Moors brought rice to Spain and it has become a staple food here, including the fact that it's grown in many areas of this country.
Here's a rough idea of our local paella.
5th photo down is the nearest lookalike to the dish (not the girl).
http://perso.wanadoo.es/janthkm/paella/paella...

I'm not sure when the photos were taken, because our local village fiesta processions take place after dark, but this page is all about it:
http://thespanishadventurebegins.blogspot.com...
PS, This year's fiesta ended today.
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#13 Aug 19, 2012
Earthling-1 wrote:
<quoted text>The Moors brought rice to Spain and it has become a staple food here, including the fact that it's grown in many areas of this country.
Here's a rough idea of our local paella.
5th photo down is the nearest lookalike to the dish (not the girl).
http://perso.wanadoo.es/janthkm/paella/paella...
I'm not sure when the photos were taken, because our local village fiesta processions take place after dark, but this page is all about it:
http://thespanishadventurebegins.blogspot.com...
PS, This year's fiesta ended today.
Yep, that looks like what we created and still do. I remember the recipe called for 'what's fresh and available', now that's a recipe that can be made just about anywhere with amazing results.
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#14 Aug 19, 2012
In the south we have a version called jambalaya. A favorite at my house. Not usually prepared over an open fire, but a deep pot on the stove. However with a little thought and the right pan, can be cooked on the outside grill.

Around here in the summer food prep outside is preferable to heating up the kitchen. I imagine the same consideration is prevelant in your area.

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain retreat, SE Spain

#15 Aug 19, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
Yep, that looks like what we created and still do. I remember the recipe called for 'what's fresh and available', now that's a recipe that can be made just about anywhere with amazing results.
We had a 'what's fresh and available' meal today.
Some young local guys recently planted a veggie garden in an open field and invited neighbours to help themselves, so yesterday we picked up one fallen tomato that weighed about 1/2 lb in old money, and a marrow that was just beginning to dry out.
Stuffed with leeks, carrots, pine nuts, mushroom, peas, one tbsp smooth peanut butter, oat flakes, yummy with home made tomato sauce.
A meat free day, I hope Nauseous is proud of me.
ֿ

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain retreat, SE Spain

#16 Aug 19, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
In the south we have a version called jambalaya. A favorite at my house. Not usually prepared over an open fire, but a deep pot on the stove. However with a little thought and the right pan, can be cooked on the outside grill.
We had jambalaya in New Orleans, 1981, but with so many recipes to choose from, never got round to recreating it since.
Fun Facts wrote:
Around here in the summer food prep outside is preferable to heating up the kitchen. I imagine the same consideration is prevelant in your area.
It would be, but indoors usually starts off a little cooler, so outdoors is mostly only an evening experience, a time when we hardly ever cook.
SpaceBlues

Rosharon, TX

#17 Aug 20, 2012
1. Reduce our personal carbon footprint by 20 percent in the next year.

2. Stop subsidizing fossil fuels.

3. Vote for Obama/Biden.

4. Shift towards more vegetarian diets.

5. Scientists better communicate the scientific facts underlying climate change.+

6. Scientists and engineers develop cheap alternative energy sources to reduce dependence on fossil fuels.+

+
http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/591970/...

“I Luv Carbon Dioxide”

Since: Dec 08

Home, sweet home.

#18 Aug 23, 2012
The ritual of meatless Monday is like a faith doctrine. Sacrifice is an aspect of religious belief, not science.
litesong

Lynnwood, WA

#19 Aug 23, 2012
steenking piddling diddling middling mudling mudslinger brian_g stumble butt dumpster diver wrote:
The ritual of meatless Monday is like a faith doctrine. Sacrifice is an aspect of religious belief, not science.
Of course, "steenking piddling diddling middling mudling mudslinger brian_g stumble butt dumpster diver" never got anywhere in science or mathematics to know the sacrifices of scientists or mathematicians.

Ask him how much he sacrificed for his science & mathematics background. He has to say,'...none, at all!'

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Stanford University Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Vaccines contain DNA fragments from aborted hum... Apr 13 friend 7
News That controversial retracted study on gender an... Apr 9 Christshariahns 1
News Expert says renewable energy in reach Mar '16 Solarman 1
News From Little Village to Stanford: Chicago teen h... Mar '16 wild child 1
News Meet the Candidate: Carly Fiorina (May '15) Feb '16 Ritual Habitual 868
News Huge publishing scandal engulfs South Korean un... Feb '16 JimJim 3
News Paul, Fiorina cut from main stage at next GOP d... Jan '16 Ritual Habitual 1
More from around the web