Americans back greenhouse gas cuts from power plants

Nov 12, 2013 Full story: USA Today 6

The vast majority of Americans say global warming is mostly man-made, and the U.S. government should reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants -- not increase taxes on gasoline, a new study says.

Full Story
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

#1 Nov 13, 2013
Hello.. what do you expect?

From theguardian.com : The WMO said that individual tropical cyclones, such as Haiyan, could not be directly attributed to the effects of climate change.

But "higher sea levels are already making coastal populations more vulnerable to storm surges. We saw this with tragic consequences in the Philippines," Jarraud said. Seas have risen by about 20 cms (8 inches) in the past century.

As of early November 2013, there had been 86 tropical cyclones, from typhoons to Atlantic hurricanes, closing in on the 1981-2010 average of 89 storms, the WMO said.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

#2 Nov 13, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Hello.. what do you expect?
From theguardian.com : The WMO said that individual tropical cyclones, such as Haiyan, could not be directly attributed to the effects of climate change.
Agreed. Weather is an effect of 'proximate causes'. i.e the low over there vs the high over here..
SpaceBlues wrote:
Hello.. what do you expect?
But "higher sea levels are already making coastal populations more vulnerable to storm surges. We saw this with tragic consequences in the Philippines," Jarraud said. Seas have risen by about 20 cms (8 inches) in the past century.
But it is also an effect of warmer oceans, leading to larger and stronger storms. The size and the intensity of the storm enhances 'storm surge' which was the killer here. Initial reports suggested that, as a fast moving storm the normal 'flood deaths' would be minimal..
SpaceBlues wrote:
Hello.. what do you expect?
As of early November 2013, there had been 86 tropical cyclones, from typhoons to Atlantic hurricanes, closing in on the 1981-2010 average of 89 storms, the WMO said.
Nothing I have read suggests any change to the frequency of storms (other than maybe a reduction in some years due to increased wind shear). But as they start from 'proximate causes' we can expect them to be about the same in number but not in destructive force.

“Come and get it! ”

Since: Jan 09

Traverse City

#3 Nov 14, 2013
I knew it was just a matter of time before you nuts tried to pin the typhoon on the global warming hoax. I notice that when we're getting record cold temperatures in February, you loons don't say a whole lot. Oh wait, I forgot that's "global warming" too.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

#4 Nov 14, 2013
Global warming since 1997 more than twice as fast as previously estimated, new study shows

A new paper published in The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society fills in the gaps in the UK Met Office HadCRUT4 surface temperature data set, and finds that the global surface warming since 1997 has happened more than twice as fast as the HadCRUT4 estimate.[skepticalscience.com ]
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

#5 Nov 14, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Global warming since 1997 more than twice as fast as previously estimated, new study shows
A new paper published in The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society fills in the gaps in the UK Met Office HadCRUT4 surface temperature data set, and finds that the global surface warming since 1997 has happened more than twice as fast as the HadCRUT4 estimate.[skepticalscience.com ]
I gather that they filled in the polar regions? This is one glaring problem with HADCRUT, that they have so little data in the poles. ENSO tends to shift heat into or out of those regions, leading to a distorted graph of temperature trends during strong ENSO years.

One of the reasons that CRU is so quoted by the denialists during La-Nina (where it misses heating) and ignored during El-Nino years (where it has a higher slope than others).

It is a KNOWN problem that doesn't confuse the scientists who are used to having to read graphs based on their good and bad points, but it will help the public who aren't that sophisticated.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

#6 Nov 14, 2013
LessHypeMoreFact wrote:
<quoted text>
I gather that they filled in the polar regions? This is one glaring problem with HADCRUT, that they have so little data in the poles. ENSO tends to shift heat into or out of those regions, leading to a distorted graph of temperature trends during strong ENSO years.
One of the reasons that CRU is so quoted by the denialists during La-Nina (where it misses heating) and ignored during El-Nino years (where it has a higher slope than others).
It is a KNOWN problem that doesn't confuse the scientists who are used to having to read graphs based on their good and bad points, but it will help the public who aren't that sophisticated.
You've gathered correctly... except others did it though one would expect they will be among those to repeat this beautiful study.

http://www.skepticalscience.com/global-warmin...

Incomplete global coverage is a potential source of bias in global temperature reconstructions if the unsampled regions are not uniformly distributed over the planet's surface. The widely used HadCRUT4 dataset covers on average about 84% of the globe over recent decades, with the unsampled regions being concentrated at the poles and over Africa. Three existing reconstructions with near-global coverage are examined, each suggesting that HadCRUT4 is subject to bias due to its treatment of unobserved regions.


Two alternative approaches for reconstructing global temperatures are explored, one based on an optimal interpolation algorithm and the other a hybrid method incorporating additional information from the satellite temperature record. The methods are validated on the basis of their skill at reconstructing omitted sets of observations. Both methods provide superior results than excluding the unsampled regions, with the hybrid method showing particular skill around the regions where no observations are available.


Temperature trends are compared for the hybrid global temperature reconstruction and the raw HadCRUT4 data. The widely quoted trend since 1997 in the hybrid global reconstruction is two and a half times greater than the corresponding trend in the coverage-biased HadCRUT4 data. Coverage bias causes a cool bias in recent temperatures relative to the late 1990s which increases from around 1998 to the present. Trends starting in 1997 or 1998 are particularly biased with respect to the global trend. The issue is exacerbated by the strong El Niņo event of 1997-1998, which also tends to suppress trends starting during those years.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/qj...

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