Central Louisiana history shaped by achievements of black citizens

Mar 1, 2011 Full story: The Town Talk

Gwendolyn Y. Elmore, president and executive director of the Arna Bontemps African-American Museum and Cultural Arts Center in downtown Alexandria, stands near a marker honoring Bontemps, an important author in the Harlem Renaissance.

Full Story

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#1 Mar 1, 2011
African American Museum. You fought segregation so that you could segregate yourselves.
david

United States

#6 Mar 1, 2011
Later on August 14, a significant amount of mob action took place. A crowd of white citizens gathered in downtown Springfield, outraged by the fact that two black men had allegedly committed brutal crimes against white townspeople. The crowd demanded the release of the prisoners, but Sheriff Charles Werner was able to remove the two from jail and transport them to safety in Bloomington 64 miles away, with the help of restaurant owner Harry Loper.

When the crowd learned that the two black prisoners had been moved with the help of Loper, they walked to his restaurant to exact revenge. Despite the fact that Loper stood in the doorway, the mob trashed the building and torched his expensive automobile. Realizing that the local authorities were overwhelmed by the crowd, Governor Charles S. Deneen activated the state militia.

The crowd now directed their anger toward the rest of Springfield's minorities. They proceeded to Fishman's Hardware, owned by a Jewish businessman, and stole weapons to use in the further destruction of homes and businesses. Then the mob moved on the Levee, a predominantly African American area, and destroyed numerous black-owned businesses.

As the crowd moved on towards the Badlands, another black neighborhood, they encountered a black barber named Scott Burton. Burton attempted to defend his business with a warning shot from a shotgun, and was killed when the crowd returned fire. Burton's shop was burned and his body was dragged to a nearby saloon, where it was hung from a tree.

The mob then burned black-owned homes in the Badlands. By this time, an estimated 12,000 people had gathered to watch the houses burn. When firefighters arrived, people in the crowd impeded their progress and cut their hoses. African American citizens were forced to flee the town, find refuge with sympathetic whites, or hide in the State Arsenal. The National Guard was finally able to disperse the crowd late that night.

The next day, Saturday, August 15, as thousands of black residents fled the city, five thousand National Guard troops marched in to keep the peace, along with curiosity seekers and tourists who had read about the riots in the newspaper. The peace was soon broken, however, when a new mob formed and began marching toward the State Arsenal, where many black residents were being housed. When confronted by a National Guardsman, the crowd changed direction and instead walked to the home of black resident William Donnegan, who had committed no crime, but had been married to a white woman for 32 years; Donnegan himself was either 84 or 76-years old. When Donnegan came outside, the mob captured him, cut his throat, and lynched him in a tree in the yard of what was later known as The Hay-Edwards School across the street from his home

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#8 Mar 1, 2011
david wrote:
Later on August 14, a significant amount of mob action took place. A crowd of white citizens gathered in downtown Springfield, outraged by the fact that two black men had allegedly committed brutal crimes against white townspeople. The crowd demanded the release of the prisoners, but Sheriff Charles Werner was able to remove the two from jail and transport them to safety in Bloomington 64 miles away, with the help of restaurant owner Harry Loper.
When the crowd learned that the two black prisoners had been moved with the help of Loper, they walked to his restaurant to exact revenge. Despite the fact that Loper stood in the doorway, the mob trashed the building and torched his expensive automobile. Realizing that the local authorities were overwhelmed by the crowd, Governor Charles S. Deneen activated the state militia.
The crowd now directed their anger toward the rest of Springfield's minorities. They proceeded to Fishman's Hardware, owned by a Jewish businessman, and stole weapons to use in the further destruction of homes and businesses. Then the mob moved on the Levee, a predominantly African American area, and destroyed numerous black-owned businesses.
As the crowd moved on towards the Badlands, another black neighborhood, they encountered a black barber named Scott Burton. Burton attempted to defend his business with a warning shot from a shotgun, and was killed when the crowd returned fire. Burton's shop was burned and his body was dragged to a nearby saloon, where it was hung from a tree.
The mob then burned black-owned homes in the Badlands. By this time, an estimated 12,000 people had gathered to watch the houses burn. When firefighters arrived, people in the crowd impeded their progress and cut their hoses. African American citizens were forced to flee the town, find refuge with sympathetic whites, or hide in the State Arsenal. The National Guard was finally able to disperse the crowd late that night.
The next day, Saturday, August 15, as thousands of black residents fled the city, five thousand National Guard troops marched in to keep the peace, along with curiosity seekers and tourists who had read about the riots in the newspaper. The peace was soon broken, however, when a new mob formed and began marching toward the State Arsenal, where many black residents were being housed. When confronted by a National Guardsman, the crowd changed direction and instead walked to the home of black resident William Donnegan, who had committed no crime, but had been married to a white woman for 32 years; Donnegan himself was either 84 or 76-years old. When Donnegan came outside, the mob captured him, cut his throat, and lynched him in a tree in the yard of what was later known as The Hay-Edwards School across the street from his home
O.J.

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#9 Mar 5, 2011
Truthfully, I didn't see the point.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Pacific Union College Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
County redraws 'bubble' maps (Mar '09) Mar '09 Twilightfan 1
Stop the next war before it starts (Oct '08) Oct '08 Andrew Yu-Jen Wang 2
More from around the web