In Downturn, Families Strain to Pay Tuition

Oct 16, 2008 | Posted by: Iria | Full story: www.nytimes.com

With the unemployment rate rising and a recession mentality gripping the country, financial aid administrators say they expect many more calls like the one from Ms. Jacobs. More families are applying for federal aid, and a recent survey found that an increasing portion of families expected to need student loans.

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Since: Mar 08

Lexington, KY

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#1
Oct 16, 2008
 
In the next year or so things are only going to get worse and the parents are not going to have the money to bail out the kids and the parents also know that worse is down the road so they know that if they bail out the kids it won't do any good because even still they will have to quit school for lack of money so in the next year or so I expect millions and millions of college students to quit or acquire leaves of absence.

I don't find it to disaterous to see colleges going broke.
EASY MONEY

Bangkok, Thailand

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#2
Oct 16, 2008
 
A quarter of those don't belong in college to begin with, a trade school would benefit them a hell of a lot more.

Since: Mar 08

Lexington, KY

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#4
Oct 17, 2008
 
EASY MONEY wrote:
A quarter of those don't belong in college to begin with, a trade school would benefit them a hell of a lot more.
Non manual labor in our country is disappearing at a frantic rate and one of the reasons for going to college is to avoid a lifestyle or a career that is comprised of manual labor.

These kids are in for a rude awakening because that is what is going to happen to them, standing in line for a manual labor job that pay or pays little more than minimum wage.

A college diploma is little more than a very high priced permit to get a softer, higher paying job.

I would love to see a public poll or a study of college diploma holders over the past 10 or 20 years who readily admit that their diplomas are worthless to gain employment but yet they still got all those school bills.

Plus we now live in a society where getting a job isn't a matter of putting in a job application and hoping for the best.

It is a matter of knowing someone there already by either an employee or someone else in the company and then putting in your app later as a formality.

Do some research of local stores and fast food restaurants to see if the people that work there are family members with different last names or most are friends that all live on the same street or in the same neighborhood.

Even the company who holds the records can see what is going on with all that.

Either way, a diploma whether high school or college is a wall decoration.

Since: Mar 08

Lexington, KY

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#5
Oct 17, 2008
 
EASY MONEY wrote:
A quarter of those don't belong in college to begin with, a trade school would benefit them a hell of a lot more.
It still doesn't do any good because once the population increased and those types of schools mass proliferated in the 70's and 80's to dot the landscape they were producing more trade qualified people than our industry base needed so it is or was a matter of knowing someone.

Even after all that money for school then or still maybe even now they start as an "apprentice" getting minimum wage and more often than not they are the "apprentice" shoveling the ditches for a contractor. What they learned in school was useless and they paid all that money to end up being ditch diggers right along side of the ditch diggers working for the same contractor for the same pay.

I always seen it as a racket.

A huge glut of tradesman piling money into union coffers while only the longstanding members of the union got work. That's why I never joined a union. I knew too many people who were paying dues and never got work, they were just being used for their money on the hollow promises of getting work and the blackmail of no hope of getting work if you stop paying dues and quit the union.

Since: Mar 08

Lexington, KY

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#6
Oct 17, 2008
 
EASY MONEY wrote:
A quarter of those don't belong in college to begin with, a trade school would benefit them a hell of a lot more.
I should also mention that mass producing these people for these trained trades in exchange for all the money both public and private really only drove down wages for that trade because of the total glut of trained workers who could do the job so in most cases since money is the object of all life as far as a company goes they took those who agreed to the lowest price then it didn't take long for that price became the industry standard.

Kind of like down from $15.00 an hour to $8.00.

Since: Mar 08

Lexington, KY

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#7
Oct 17, 2008
 
As the years passed I and as I as watching others the wages went down and down and down.

Everybody was a carpenter, auto mechanic, residential electrician, mason, auto body, welder, pipe fitter, painter, roofer, you name it. Many of them even went to the same local schools or were trained in Job Corps.

As many was in that social group of friends or the community that's how many trades there were in the group but it was all useless as a viable source of income and everyone ended up doing everything else except what they were trained for and for far less money.

It is still just as useless now.

“Tell the Truth”

Since: Nov 07

Orlando, Florida

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#8
Oct 17, 2008
 
When did it become a requirement for parents to pay for college for their kids? When did it become a requirement to have a college degree?

There was once a time when only certain people went to college - those who were looking for what was considered then a "profession" - doctor, lawyer, teacher, engineer, etc. and girls went looking for a college-educated husband.

Everyone else left high school and got A JOB! Just imagine. They went to work right out of high school!!! That's because high school actually prepared them for work. What a concept. They didn't have to spend 4 years in college learning to write papers and do math they should have mastered in 10th grade.

Young people who went to work learned on the job. Companies actually too the time to train them. Isn't that something?!? And people worked their way up the ladder of their career through work experience, not by a spring breaking their way through 4 years of education and then get handed a piece of paper that proves their no smarter than they were 4 years ago.

Suddenly colleges decided it wasn't enough to train the "professions", they wanted more $$$$. And so began the slow downward spiral of high school training, the upswing of college degrees, the disinterest in companies training employees, and a growing number of parents wanting to get rid of their high school graduate sons and daughters.

There are so many management degrees out there now, some of these poor college-educated folks are running a McDonald's just to try to pay off the student loans. Master's degrees aren't worth half as much as they used to be because everyone has one.

Like healthcare, education has become an industry, and once that happens it's all about the money. I have nothing against higher education. It's a necessity for some professions, but most average jobs, per se, can be learned as the worker does them.

If high schools are graduating 18 year olds who need 4 more years of education to be able to read, write and follow directions in the workplace, then instead of throwing money at colleges, we should be demanding a fix to our lower education system.

“Tell the Truth”

Since: Nov 07

Orlando, Florida

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#9
Oct 17, 2008
 
In Real Time wrote:
As the years passed I and as I as watching others the wages went down and down and down.
Everybody was a carpenter, auto mechanic, residential electrician, mason, auto body, welder, pipe fitter, painter, roofer, you name it. Many of them even went to the same local schools or were trained in Job Corps.
As many was in that social group of friends or the community that's how many trades there were in the group but it was all useless as a viable source of income and everyone ended up doing everything else except what they were trained for and for far less money.
It is still just as useless now.
A trade is still THE most viable and secure work source around. Once you learn a trade, no one can take that away from you. You can take it anywhere, you can start your own business, you have knowledge that most people don't.

There will always be a need for electricians, plumbers, repair people, welders, construction experts, and others who work with their hands. For those who sit behind a desk and don't get their hands dirty, they must call an electrician to install a ceiling fan at their house. They have to pay someone to replace the water pump on their car. And let the toilet overflow and see who they call.

Hired a plumber lately? You could take a Disney vacation for what they charge to replace a water heater. Why? Because they know how to replace a water heater and most people don't.

Our society is filling up with middle managers and batchelor degrees are becoming about as impressive as old newspapers, but people who have the skills to build and repair are still in demand. AND they aren't up to their necks in debt for college. They learn their trade and owe no one. What a great way to start out in life.

Since: Mar 08

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#10
Oct 17, 2008
 
upturn or downturn there will always be families struggling to get a college education for their children! as long as the government fronts a dept of education (controlled by teachers and unions) who dictate what will and will not be taught and as long as colleges require millions of dollars annually for sports programs costs will continue to climb!! costs are lower overall when students attend 2 years at the community college level before moving on to ivy league schools!!

Since: Oct 08

Salt Lake City, UT

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#11
Oct 17, 2008
 
*so glad I dont have a college education*

Actually, it never interested me to get a degree. Sure a class here and there would be nice, but I can learn just as well on my own. And I have great experience in the work I have done in my time or employment. I think it's a joke for anyone not wanting to be a Doctor, Lawyer etc. HAHAH become a witch ;) haha

anyway. I agree, as America and the world changes, it will become very hard to afford an education. I'm sick of lazy America wanting to do nothing for a million bucks.

The people I hire sometimes, it's astounding of their mind frame, and most of all, their expectations.

it's time for a change, actually our governement isn't going to do it....WE need to change. The time of raising spoiled kids has got to come to and end. eh, but what do I know, I'm a hard working citizen.
Paul

Vancouver, WA

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#12
Oct 17, 2008
 
I wonder if colleges and universities will drop their prices to make it more affodable?

The costs of higher educations have been growing much faster than inflation for years.
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0781878.html
Mac-7

Richardson, TX

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#13
Oct 17, 2008
 
Paul wrote:
I wonder if colleges and universities will drop their prices to make it more affodable?
The costs of higher educations have been growing much faster than inflation for years.
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0781878.html
That's exactly what I was thinking.

Maybe the greedy educators could make college more affordable instead of continually raising their prices.
Thought of the day

Homeland, FL

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#14
Oct 17, 2008
 
Should you get depressed these days and think nobody cares if you live or die, try missing a few loan shark payments.
high school drop out

Plainfield, NJ

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#15
Oct 17, 2008
 
we should not pay those high prices of tuition anyway!
Mac-7

Richardson, TX

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#16
Oct 17, 2008
 
high school drop out wrote:
we should not pay those high prices of tuition anyway!
The educators all have golden parachutes.

When is the last time anyone heard of a college professor getting laid off because business was slow the university couldn't afford to pay him?

Since: Mar 08

Lexington, KY

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#17
Oct 17, 2008
 
Donna Atlanta GA wrote:
When did it become a requirement for parents to pay for college for their kids?
About a hair of a second after the cosigned those papers.

I can just see the guy behind the desk as he snatches them away, "Bwuahahahaha."

“Headed toward the cliff”

Since: Nov 07

Tawas City, Michigan

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#18
Oct 17, 2008
 
Have you sheeple ever heard of people actually working to pay for their education? Try getting some real world experience and earn some money for college by working for a few years. If you still can't afford college then you can always join the military and get free tuition- that's how I got my degree.

Parents need to cut the apron strings. You aren't doing your kids any favors by giving them everything. That's why kids are so spoiled these days.

Since: Mar 08

Lexington, KY

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#19
Oct 17, 2008
 
WeTheSheeple wrote:
Have you sheeple ever heard of people actually working to pay for their education? Try getting some real world experience and earn some money for college by working for a few years. If you still can't afford college then you can always join the military and get free tuition- that's how I got my degree.
Parents need to cut the apron strings. You aren't doing your kids any favors by giving them everything. That's why kids are so spoiled these days.
It's OK to reduce expenses if need be, even no longer paying for school, even no longer paying for the car, but don't turn against your own children by turning them out on the streets.

Explain to them the evil that destroyed their hopes and dreams then work together.

Damn you for proposing abandoning a connection.
Paul

Vancouver, WA

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#20
Oct 18, 2008
 
Mac-7 wrote:
<quoted text>
The educators all have golden parachutes.
When is the last time anyone heard of a college professor getting laid off because business was slow the university couldn't afford to pay him?
They lay off the groundskeepers, the cleaning crew, the maintenance staff, administrative staff, clerical staff, and their instructors. Tenured profs are safe.

Everyone on the lower rungs of 'education' gets the ax.

Hmm... this kinda reminds me of the debate on the Obama tax plan.
Mac-7

Richardson, TX

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#21
Oct 18, 2008
 
Paul wrote:
<quoted text>
They lay off the groundskeepers, the cleaning crew, the maintenance staff, administrative staff, clerical staff, and their instructors. Tenured profs are safe.
Everyone on the lower rungs of 'education' gets the ax.
Hmm... this kinda reminds me of the debate on the Obama tax plan.
Exactly.

Golden parachutes for the mostly elite professors and top execs of the school.

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