Wiley faces more charge

Wiley faces more charge

There are 14 comments on the Erie Times News story from Dec 23, 2011, titled Wiley faces more charge. In it, Erie Times News reports that:

Edinboro University of Pennsylvania police have filed three charges against Erie native Justin Wiley in connection with an argument Dec.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Erie Times News.

TaxNoMore

Los Angeles, CA

#1 Dec 24, 2011
Wiley, 19, a freshman at Edinboro, is accused of shoving a woman during an argument and throwing a toilet plunger that struck her in the face and caused a contusion under her right eye.

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Hey gurl, give it up to the "Wiley".
antagagnostic

Florham Park, NJ

#2 Dec 24, 2011
TaxNoMore wrote:
Wiley, 19, a freshman at Edinboro, is accused of shoving a woman during an argument and throwing a toilet plunger that struck her in the face and caused a contusion under her right eye.
*********
Hey gurl, give it up to the "Wiley".
You must have a real interesting live in California......not!
GM Lancer Pride

Waterford, PA

#3 Dec 25, 2011
He must have been counseled by Chet Moffett.... See discussion "Prep Issues"
TaxNoMore

Los Angeles, CA

#4 Dec 28, 2011
In Washington area, African American students suspended and expelled two to five times as often as whites

Across the Washington area, black students are suspended and expelled two to five times as often as white students, creating disparities in discipline that experts say reflect a growing national problem.

An analysis by The Washington Post shows the phenomenon both in the suburbs and in the city, from the far reaches of Southern Maryland to the subdivisions of Fairfax, Prince George’s and Montgomery counties.

Last year, for example, one in seven black students in St. Mary’s County were suspended from school, compared with one in 20 white students. In Alexandria, black students were nearly six times as likely to be suspended as their white peers.

In Fairfax, where the suicide in January of a white high school football player who had been suspended brought an outcry for change, African American students were four times as likely that year to be suspended as white students, and Hispanic students were twice as likely.

The problems extend beyond the Washington area to school districts across the country and are among a host of concerns about school discipline that sparked a joint effort by the U.S. Justice and Education departments in July to look into reforms.

Experts say disparities appear to have complex causes. A disproportionate number of black students live below the poverty line or with a single parent, factors that affect disciplinary patterns.

But experts say those factors do not fully explain racial differences in discipline.

Other contributing factors could include unintended bias, unequal access to highly effective teachers and differences in school leadership styles.

Since: Jun 11

Waterford, PA

#5 Dec 28, 2011
TaxNoMore wrote:
In Washington area, African American students suspended and expelled two to five times as often as whites
Across the Washington area, black students are suspended and expelled two to five times as often as white students, creating disparities in discipline that experts say reflect a growing national problem.
An analysis by The Washington Post shows the phenomenon both in the suburbs and in the city, from the far reaches of Southern Maryland to the subdivisions of Fairfax, Prince George’s and Montgomery counties.
Last year, for example, one in seven black students in St. Mary’s County were suspended from school, compared with one in 20 white students. In Alexandria, black students were nearly six times as likely to be suspended as their white peers.
In Fairfax, where the suicide in January of a white high school football player who had been suspended brought an outcry for change, African American students were four times as likely that year to be suspended as white students, and Hispanic students were twice as likely.
The problems extend beyond the Washington area to school districts across the country and are among a host of concerns about school discipline that sparked a joint effort by the U.S. Justice and Education departments in July to look into reforms.
Experts say disparities appear to have complex causes. A disproportionate number of black students live below the poverty line or with a single parent, factors that affect disciplinary patterns.
But experts say those factors do not fully explain racial differences in discipline.
Other contributing factors could include unintended bias, unequal access to highly effective teachers and differences in school leadership styles.
What's your point here? Is this factor news to anyone? Ok, ok...I get it! It must be the fault of those overpaid union thug pig teachers, huh?(Hope you had a great holiday!)
Stu Pedaso

Erie, PA

#6 Dec 28, 2011
The boy needs to get hiself a good democrat funded lawyer, to keep him out of the clink until he can vote for Obama a few times next November.
haha

Erie, PA

#7 Dec 29, 2011
TaxNoMore wrote:
In Washington area, African American students suspended and expelled two to five times as often as whites

Across the Washington area, black students are suspended and expelled two to five times as often as white students, creating disparities in discipline that experts say reflect a growing national problem.

An analysis by The Washington Post shows the phenomenon both in the suburbs and in the city, from the far reaches of Southern Maryland to the subdivisions of Fairfax, Prince GeorgeÂ’s and Montgomery counties.

Last year, for example, one in seven black students in St. MaryÂ’s County were suspended from school, compared with one in 20 white students. In Alexandria, black students were nearly six times as likely to be suspended as their white peers.

In Fairfax, where the suicide in January of a white high school football player who had been suspended brought an outcry for change, African American students were four times as likely that year to be suspended as white students, and Hispanic students were twice as likely.

The problems extend beyond the Washington area to school districts across the country and are among a host of concerns about school discipline that sparked a joint effort by the U.S. Justice and Education departments in July to look into reforms.

Experts say disparities appear to have complex causes. A disproportionate number of black students live below the poverty line or with a single parent, factors that affect disciplinary patterns.

But experts say those factors do not fully explain racial differences in discipline.

Other contributing factors could include unintended bias, unequal access to highly effective teachers and differences in school leadership styles.
Or, it may be cultural, that is a culture that excuses and even encourages anti social behavior that leads to school suspensions and, eventually, prison.
Oh well.
Ha ha ha
#callingAspadeAspade
TaxNoMore

Los Angeles, CA

#8 Dec 29, 2011
the antithesis wrote:
<quoted text>
What's your point here? Is this factor news to anyone? Ok, ok...I get it! It must be the fault of those overpaid union thug pig teachers, huh?(Hope you had a great holiday!)
**********

Overpaid and underachieving* union thug pig ass teachers.

(get it right)
**********
(Hope you had a great holiday!)(you also)

71 degrees makes a great Christmas

Since: Jun 11

Waterford, PA

#9 Dec 29, 2011
TaxNoMore wrote:
<quoted text>
**********
Overpaid and underachieving* union thug pig ass teachers.
(get it right)
**********
(Hope you had a great holiday!)(you also)
71 degrees makes a great Christmas
Sorry! I'll work on over my week-long hiatus from the students! If not, I'll have to wait for my grossly lucrative retirement in three years! One way or the other, I'll get it right!
TaxNoMore

Los Angeles, CA

#10 Dec 29, 2011
the antithesis wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry! I'll work on over my week-long hiatus from the students! If not, I'll have to wait for my grossly lucrative retirement in three years! One way or the other, I'll get it right!
**********
I'll have to wait for my grossly lucrative retirement in three years!

**********

Holy shit I guess so..........

..........

This year marks the beginning of a steady increase in state payments to the plans.

The state this year is contributing $693 million to SERS and $761 million to PSERS. Using current projections, the state will be paying $2.1 billion annually into SERS and $8 billion annually into PSERS by 2035, to make up for a decade of underfunding the plan while also increasing benefits.

According to a new report from the National Bureau of Economic Research, a New York-based research nonprofit, the pension obligation will top $1,500 per household per year in Pennsylvania for the next 30 years.

When the caps expire in 2015, the PSERS system will have an unfunded liability of about $40 billion, according to the funds’ own estimates. The debt will continue growing, until it exceeds $47 billion in 2020, according to current projections.

At that point, the state will be pouring more than $5 billion annually into PSERS, a figure that will continue climbing until it passes $8 billion annually in 2035.

Holy shit !!!!

Since: Jun 11

Waterford, PA

#11 Dec 29, 2011
TaxNoMore wrote:
<quoted text>
**********
I'll have to wait for my grossly lucrative retirement in three years!
**********
Holy shit I guess so..........
..........
This year marks the beginning of a steady increase in state payments to the plans.
The state this year is contributing $693 million to SERS and $761 million to PSERS. Using current projections, the state will be paying $2.1 billion annually into SERS and $8 billion annually into PSERS by 2035, to make up for a decade of underfunding the plan while also increasing benefits.
According to a new report from the National Bureau of Economic Research, a New York-based research nonprofit, the pension obligation will top $1,500 per household per year in Pennsylvania for the next 30 years.
When the caps expire in 2015, the PSERS system will have an unfunded liability of about $40 billion, according to the funds’ own estimates. The debt will continue growing, until it exceeds $47 billion in 2020, according to current projections.
At that point, the state will be pouring more than $5 billion annually into PSERS, a figure that will continue climbing until it passes $8 billion annually in 2035.
Holy shit !!!!
Hey now...You don't have to worry about me! I'll only be pulling in a little over $100 million! I'll be fine!!! Wholly shit!!!
TaxNoMore

Los Angeles, CA

#12 Dec 30, 2011
the antithesis wrote:
<quoted text>
Hey now...You don't have to worry about me! I'll only be pulling in a little over $100 million! I'll be fine!!! Wholly shit!!!
**********
I'll only be pulling in a little over $100 million!
**********

Man, dat is "The Whole Shit"

and nuttin' but "The Whole Shit"!

**********
It's Your Civil Right

Sharpton:

Offering Public Sector Employees 401k's Instead of Pensions Violates Their Civil Rights, or Something

Looks like the "Reverend" Al Sharpton gets a little testy when mildly challenged by an actual reporter.

Surprise, surprise.

Like so many liberals, he is accustomed to having media stenographers follow him around.

He's just not used to fielding real questions.

All the reporter did here was ask Sharpton to elaborate on his specious assertion that offering 401k's instead of pensions to public unions amounts to a civil rights violation.

Obviously, Sharpton couldn't back that one up.

http://jammiewearingfool.blogspot.com/2011/06...
TaxNoMore

Los Angeles, CA

#13 Dec 30, 2011
Hey now...You don't have to worry about me!

I'll only be pulling in a little over $100 million!

I'll be fine!!!

Wholly shit!!!

**********

It's Your Civil Right

**********

The Millionaire Cop Next Door

posted by RICH KARLGAARD

It is said that government workers now make, on average, 30% more than private sector workers.

Put that fantasy aside.

It far underestimates the real figures.

By my calculations, government workers make more than twice as much.

Government workers are America’s fastest-growing millionaires.

Doubt it?

Then ask yourself:

What is the net present value of an $80,000 annual pension payout with additional full health benefits?

Working backward, the total NPV would depend on expected returns of a basket of safe investments–blue chip stocks, dividends and U.S. Treasury bonds.

Investment pros like my friend Barry Glassman say 4% is a reasonable return today.

That’s a pitiful yield, isn’t it?

It is sure to disappoint the scores of millions of baby boomers who will soon enter retirement with nothing more than their desiccated 401(k) s, down 30% on average from 30 months ago, and a bit of Social Security.

Based on this small but unfortunately realistic 4% return, an $80,000 annual pension payout implies a rather large pot of money behind it–$2 million, to be precise.

That’s a lot.

One might guess that a $2 million stash would be in the 95th percentile for the 77 million baby boomers who will soon face retirement.

That $2 million also happens to be the implied booty of your average California policeman who retires at age 55.

Typical cities in California have a police officer’s retirement plan that works as follows: 3% at 50.

As the North County Times of Carlsbad, Calif., explains:

Carlsbad offers its police and firefighters a “3-percent-at-50&#8243; retirement plan, meaning that emergency services workers who retire at age 50 can get 3 percent of their highest salary times the number of years they have worked for the city.

City officials have said that in Carlsbad, the average firefighter or police officer typically retires at age 55 and has 28 years of service.

Using the 3 percent salary calculation, that person would receive an annual city pension of $76,440.

That does not include health benefits, which might push real retirement compensation close to $100,000 a year.

Who are America’s fastest-growing class of millionaires?

They are

*police officers,

*firefighters,

*teachers

*federal bureaucrats

who, unless things change drastically, will be paid something near their full salaries every year–until death–after retiring in their mid-50s.

That is equivalent to a retirement sum worth millions of dollars.

If you further ask the question:

How much salary would it take to live, save a build a $2 million stash over a 30-year career, the answer would be:

somewhere close to $75,000 more than the nominal salary, if you include all the tax bites associated with earning, saving and investing money.

In other words, if a police officer, firefighter, teacher or federal bureaucrat is making $75,000 a year, she is effectively making twice that amount.

Implied in her annual pension payout is that she diligently saved half of her annual salary–after taxes–in order to save, invest and build–again, after taxes–the $2 million pot.

So when you hear that government workers now make, on average, 30% more than private sector workers, you are not getting the full story.

Government workers make more than twice as much as private sector workers, on average, when you include the net present value of their pensions.

http://blogs.forbes.com/digitalrules/2010/06/...

Since: Jun 11

Waterford, PA

#14 Dec 31, 2011
Come on now....You seem like an intelligent person so you KNOW that article is an outlandishly skewed extrapolation of facts/figures! How does one have $24K/yr worth of health benefits? What about taxes being taken out of these salaries? Wouldn't it be more realistic to look at net salaries as opposed to gross salaries? Wouldn't these retirees have any bills to pay out of their retirement? No gas, electric, cable, food, etc? This obviously biased article you produce here is unrealistic. The "author" creates a sum of $2 million based on a person averaging about $72K/yr. Who starts at and stays at a figure of $72K? The article also assumes that a person never spent a dime and were to have saved every cent all while earning an average of 4%. Realistic? Nope! I know plenty of retired teachers, some retired state government workers, and a few local police retirees. Not a single one of them have ANYwhere near the worth that the "author" speaks of, even the most frugal of them! A grossly unrealistic article!!!!!
PS How much money do you think Karlgaard makes per year? Try Googling that fact!

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