China's high-speed rail may link 17 nations

Mar 11, 2010 Full story: People's Daily Online 18

By Kang Juan Less than two years after China's first high-speed railway went into operation, the country is now planning to extend its rail network beyond its borders, a project that will involve 17 nations, a Ministry of Railways spokesman confirmed to the Global Times Thursday.

Full Story
RayH

Shenzhen, China

#1 Mar 11, 2010
At 13,000 kilometers by 2012, this would be 50 % of the high-speed railways of the world.
INK

Carlingford, Australia

#2 Mar 11, 2010
China to build high-speed rail link to Europe NICKY PHILLIPS AND ANDREW WEST
March 10, 2010

China has unveiled what it bills as the fastest rail link in the world - a train connecting the modern cities of Guangzhou and Wuhan at an average speed of 350 kilometres an hour.

THE journey from London to Beijing by rail could take just two days under a Chinese plan to build an international network for trains that can travel almost as fast as aircraft.

Three networks are planned, with the Britain to China route to be extended to Singapore, and built within a decade.

Passengers on a second route would travel to the north of China and through Russia and on to Germany, where the network would join the European railway system.

A third network would extend south through Vietnam, Thailand, Burma and Malaysia, the London newspaper The Daily Telegraph reports. The trains are expected to travel at more than 320 km/h.

''We are aiming for the trains to run almost as fast as aeroplanes,'' a member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering said.

Last year China unveiled the world's fastest train, the Harmony Express, which can reach 350 km/h.

High-speed rail networks exist in Japan and Europe, but not in Australia.

The chief executive of the research group CRC for Rail Innovation, David George, said high-speed rail was a well-established technology and it was time Australia had an in-depth look at using it.

The chief executive of the Australasian Railway Association, Bryan Nye, said Australia already had the market for Asian-style high-speed rail, especially in the Melbourne-Sydney-Brisbane corridor. He said China recently tested a train at 380 km/h and had made a 1000-kilometre journey in two hours 50 minutes.

''If we could get a Sydney-Melbourne trip to three hours, or just under, it would be worthwhile and competitive,'' he said.

David George agreed.''By the time you've gone to the airport and struggled through the traffic, booked in advance and then sat around, a three-hour journey between Sydney and Melbourne or Sydney and Brisbane starts to look very attractive.''

He said high-speed rail was not just a technology for First World countries.

''Poland, Saudi Arabia, Morocco are seriously looking at, or introducing high-speed rail.''

Australia needed to build extra rail capacity, he said.

''[Our] urban rail networks and many of [our] freight networks need extra capacity.''

A high-speed rail system could be ''transformational'' in terms of its impact, he said.

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/call-to-emulate-chi...
ngali

Yangzhou, China

#3 Mar 11, 2010
Cool. I'll be spending some time on those in the future.
RayH

Shenzhen, China

#4 Mar 11, 2010
The Wuhan-Beijing and Guangzhou-Shenzhen sections of the high-speed railway finishes at the end of this year.
INK

Carlingford, Australia

#5 Mar 12, 2010
Unfortunately we all know that high speed rail will never be built in Australia. Procrastination, low population, high cost and politics just prevent high speed rail to be built.

Even now we do not have a decent train system operated in a big city like Sydney. Our trains travel at snail speed of 50km/h at peak hours due to poor track and congestion. Our rail is like that of a third world compared to that of Hong kong, Europe, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan and China.
ngali

Yangzhou, China

#6 Mar 12, 2010
INK wrote:
Unfortunately we all know that high speed rail will never be built in Australia. Procrastination, low population, high cost and politics just prevent high speed rail to be built.
Even now we do not have a decent train system operated in a big city like Sydney. Our trains travel at snail speed of 50km/h at peak hours due to poor track and congestion. Our rail is like that of a third world compared to that of Hong kong, Europe, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan and China.
That's OK. We have cars for that sort of thing.
INK

Carlingford, Australia

#7 Mar 12, 2010
ngali wrote:
<quoted text>
That's OK. We have cars for that sort of thing.
It is not OK. Our roads and freeways are choked with cars which should be banned entering into cities at peak hours. Metro train is the only way to alleviate car congestions. Just look at the fast efficient metros of Shenzhen, Beijing, HK etc, they have served the population well, save time, money and less pollution.

Last week, our smart NSW government has just reversed the decision to work on the new Sydney metro (having started ground work by contractors for over a year!) due to political wranggle and cost cutting. Over here a 10 km freeway will take at least 25 years to build from conception to operation. A metro? Never! Don't dream of a high speed rail!
jon

Skudai, Malaysia

#8 Mar 12, 2010
INK wrote:
<quoted text>
It is not OK. Our roads and freeways are choked with cars which should be banned entering into cities at peak hours. Metro train is the only way to alleviate car congestions. Just look at the fast efficient metros of Shenzhen, Beijing, HK etc, they have served the population well, save time, money and less pollution.
Last week, our smart NSW government has just reversed the decision to work on the new Sydney metro (having started ground work by contractors for over a year!) due to political wranggle and cost cutting. Over here a 10 km freeway will take at least 25 years to build from conception to operation. A metro? Never! Don't dream of a high speed rail!
That is so sad. An decent city should have a decent urban transport rail system. On the long run, its the urban dwellers who benifits the most. Cars are inefficient use of fuel, takes more space actually since carparks must be provided.

25 years to build a 10km highway? Its bad here in Malaysia too, although not 25 years. Maybe we just created too much red tape and bureaucracy as the nation developed. Everyone must be happy about it, or else it is a no go. Maybe we are overdoing it.
jon

Skudai, Malaysia

#9 Mar 12, 2010
On a happy note, there is 3 proposed high speed rail links to China.

One Southeast Asian link to Singapore. Works have started in some countries. This link will probably be the 1st to make it's debut.

Second high speed link will cross Central Asia and link up with the European rail system in Germany.

Third high speed link will be from northeastern China to the Siberian Far East which will eventually link with the regular Trans-Siberian railway.

There is also talk of a link to South Korea but the issue of North Korea have to be settled first.

There is also a proposal of a link from Far East Siberia to the northern tip of Sakhalin Island, down the length of that island, crossing to Hokaido and linking with the Japanese rail grid at Sapporo. Sakhalin is a stumbling block since both Japan and Russia are claiming the island.
jon

Skudai, Malaysia

#10 Mar 12, 2010
On the link to South Asia (Pakistan and India), as far as I know, are not high speed rail link. The Himalayan mountain range represent a daunting challenge for high speed rail.
RayH

Guangzhou, China

#11 Mar 12, 2010
INK wrote:
Unfortunately we all know that high speed rail will never be built in Australia. Procrastination, low population, high cost and politics just prevent high speed rail to be built.
Even now we do not have a decent train system operated in a big city like Sydney. Our trains travel at snail speed of 50km/h at peak hours due to poor track and congestion. Our rail is like that of a third world compared to that of Hong kong, Europe, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan and China.
I took the train in Melbourne, Australia once. It reminds me of the trains in China in the 1980s.

Since: Mar 08

Long Island City, NY

#12 Mar 12, 2010
The airlines will be going out of business as it will be so much more energy efficient to travel by rail.
INK

Carlingford, Australia

#13 Mar 12, 2010
jon wrote:
On a happy note, there is 3 proposed high speed rail links to China.
One Southeast Asian link to Singapore. Works have started in some countries. This link will probably be the 1st to make it's debut.
However on the sad note, with the utter lack of dedication to maintain the existing communual trains and monorail in Malaysia, I reckon a high speed rail will just be another white elephant. I notice that the monorail stations in KL have never been cleaned and dusted since they were opened back in the 90's! The ever presence of "tidak apah" attitude by the government and public servants responsible will inevitably turn the high speed rail into another shabby toy. What a bad reflection on the ruling government to let their world class facility goes to disrepair and contempt. They can build to show off but they can never maintain to show off! What a contrast to that of Singapore, Hong Kong and Shenzhen where things are always kept spotlessly clean and maintained for their citizens and tourists!

On the same note, our trains here are just as bad. Poorly
maintained, dirty and painfully slow, not one would likely see in a developed country. Unfortunately, the same "tidak apah" attitude is found over here.
Style_1

Anaheim, CA

#14 Mar 12, 2010
Great news....

China should take lead...., everyone else will follow....

That's the way...... the Asian community will happen... just because... China can finance it.

Car is a luxury, but very wasteful.
Style_1

Anaheim, CA

#15 Mar 12, 2010
Testing
RayH

Shenzhen, China

#18 Mar 12, 2010
Zsari wrote:
The airlines will be going out of business as it will be so much more energy efficient to travel by rail.
That's what happened in Europe.
jon

Pontian, Malaysia

#19 Mar 12, 2010
Yes, maintenance is a problem that people here don't want to address. We know what the actual problem is but we can't actually do anything about it. Our affirmative action plan dictates that most contracts goes to a select group known for their laziness ...sigh
INK

Carlingford, Australia

#20 Mar 13, 2010
jon wrote:
Yes, maintenance is a problem that people here don't want to address. We know what the actual problem is but we can't actually do anything about it. Our affirmative action plan dictates that most contracts goes to a select group known for their laziness ...sigh
Tidak apah lah!

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Urumqi, China Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Urumqi parliament bans burqas in China's Xinjia... Dec 13 tom_ 19
China's ethnic region's capital to ban veiled r... Dec 11 azbob14 3
China jails seven students of Uighur scholar fo... Dec 9 Fargo Joe 1
China opens first leg of high-speed railway in ... Nov '14 RayH 1
Is China's grand ethnic experiment working? Nov '14 RayH 1
China Sentences Peaceful Uyghur Scholar Ilham T... Sep '14 Jennie PC Chiang 1
Economic model in Xinjiang must be modified to ... Aug '14 Bob Burns 1
More from around the web

NFL Latest News

Updated 7:35 am PST