6 Chinese go on trial for selling melamine

Six Chinese suspects went on trial Friday accused of making and selling the industrial chemical at the center of a tainted milk scandal blamed for killing six children and sickening nearly 300,000 others. Read more

“truth is not a majority vote”

Since: Dec 08

Laramie, WY

#1 Dec 26, 2008
A little melamine here, a little lead there, who's gonna know? What's a few thousand dead babies in the grand scheme of things when you're over a billion strong? Poisoning dogs and cats around the globe with melamine in pet food - hey, we're doing our part to stop pet overpopulation...

When did "Made in China" start to mean "with whatever was at hand, toxic or not"?
FED UP

West Springfield, MA

#2 Dec 26, 2008
I think is't about time that the Pres-elect stop ALL imports to this Country. We can make our own stuff( better) & sell it here. Screw China, Mexico & the rest.USA.....USA.....USA.
Jimmy

United States

#3 Dec 26, 2008
God love the chinks.
Caffeinated

Lake Zurich, IL

#4 Dec 26, 2008
If I didn't know better, I would say that this is a test run for an American surprise.

The US needs to become independent.
Grandma A

Lebanon, VA

#5 Dec 26, 2008
I saw those guys and it looks like they have been fitted for a nice rope. They don't screw around over there, those guys will be pushing up daisies very soon.

I agree. I think we need to become more self sufficient. From all foreign countries. But they don't listen to me.

Just as long as I don't have to drink diet caffeine free coke made in china I will be happy.
old china

Chengdu, China

#6 Dec 26, 2008
Grandma A wrote:
I saw those guys and it looks like they have been fitted for a nice rope. They don't screw around over there, those guys will be pushing up daisies very soon.
I agree. I think we need to become more self sufficient. From all foreign countries. But they don't listen to me.
Just as long as I don't have to drink diet caffeine free coke made in china I will be happy.
They don't listen to you because the cost of production including transportation insurance etc is far cheaper in countries like China than it is in America. Thank corporate greed and agressive unions.

If America starts doing her own manufacturing again then American living standards will have to drop because the products in the shops will be less affordable. The trick is to produce a product or service that a country such as China wants but cannot produce.
pay to play

Eureka, CA

#7 Dec 26, 2008
you know the dollar store? all that suff is made in chinkland. dont go there. if your to stupid to read the lable you need lead and mel.
Jane

United States

#8 Dec 26, 2008
FED UP wrote:
I think is't about time that the Pres-elect stop ALL imports to this Country. We can make our own stuff( better) & sell it here. Screw China, Mexico & the rest.USA.....USA.....USA.
You can have it either way. Accept $2 pay per hour or pay 3 times more for everything you buy. Either way, it is less money in your pockets.
Oh one more thing, from today on you will have to mow your lawn, clean your house and babysit
your kids. The Mexicons are gone.

“truth is not a majority vote”

Since: Dec 08

Laramie, WY

#9 Dec 26, 2008
old china wrote:
<quoted text>
They don't listen to you because the cost of production including transportation insurance etc is far cheaper in countries like China than it is in America. Thank corporate greed and agressive unions.
If America starts doing her own manufacturing again then American living standards will have to drop because the products in the shops will be less affordable. The trick is to produce a product or service that a country such as China wants but cannot produce.
I would think a pretty good trick would be to not include toxins in foodstuffs, but hey, call me crazy. We may be over-legislated and over-regulated and overly litigious and over-taxed, but one thing we tend to do pretty well here in the US is protect ourselves from putting obviously poisonous things in our grub or on children's toys. Sure, every once in a while someone craps in a spinach field and we get a nice little E. coli or Salmonella outbreak going, but we pretty much agree that milling toxins into food or using lead-containing compounds in kids' toys isn't in the collective best interest...

On an unrelated subject - here's something China seems to want (at least from a capitalistic standpoint), but cannot produce - a democratic society. Be careful whatcha wish for!

“truth is not a majority vote”

Since: Dec 08

Laramie, WY

#10 Dec 27, 2008
Aww, someone judged me with a spam icon and a racy icon and a disagree icon, but didn't have the cojones or intellect to post a comment. How nice. I feel so special! Thanks bud!
old china

Chengdu, China

#11 Dec 27, 2008
Wyoming Man wrote:
<quoted text>
I would think a pretty good trick would be to not include toxins in foodstuffs, but hey, call me crazy. We may be over-legislated and over-regulated and overly litigious and over-taxed, but one thing we tend to do pretty well here in the US is protect ourselves from putting obviously poisonous things in our grub or on children's toys. Sure, every once in a while someone craps in a spinach field and we get a nice little E. coli or Salmonella outbreak going, but we pretty much agree that milling toxins into food or using lead-containing compounds in kids' toys isn't in the collective best interest...
On an unrelated subject - here's something China seems to want (at least from a capitalistic standpoint), but cannot produce - a democratic society. Be careful whatcha wish for!
It was not so long ago that I remember lead paint in our houses (American houses still have the benefit of lead paint) and lead paint on the toys. Strangely no one ever used to suffer from it although I accept that ingesting lead is not good for one's health. Then there was the lead in the petrol which was far more dangerous and still no one died from lead poisoning that I can recall.

All countries have to evolve and in doing so they improve their standards. Even now American products are regularly rejected for lack of quality control. And while America generally has reasonable standards there are disease-promoting, highly toxic ingredients found in many foods that are legally sold all over the United States. They aren't just imported foods, either. They're foods manufactured in the United States by American companies, including many Fortune 500 firms according to 'naturalnews'. So I shouldn't get too complaicent.

But as a footnote - China claims that the percentage of its food products rejected by the U.S. is less than the percentage U.S. food products rejected in China. Don't know how accurate that claim is because I couldn't get the link to load.

The majority in China appear to be content with their government and are not seeking the evils of democracy. For the moment they are content with seeing their country moving forward at a pace which, if political ideology has a bearing, is an advocate for replacing democracy with the more efficient Chinese style of socialism.

But perhaps a more sensible route would be to get rid of party politics, kick out the left wing versus right wing swings and just have an elected government representing the majority of the people rather than a political party representing a minority. This appears to be where China is heading.

But wherever China lands up on the political scene is not going to change the quality of products. Only time and education will do that. And they are learning as safety measures are constantly evolving in response to problems.
old china

Chengdu, China

#12 Dec 27, 2008
Wyoming Man wrote:
Aww, someone judged me with a spam icon and a racy icon and a disagree icon, but didn't have the cojones or intellect to post a comment. How nice. I feel so special! Thanks bud!
It wasn't me. I tried to give you a "funny" icon for this post but it wont work for some reason.
old china

Chengdu, China

#13 Dec 27, 2008
Wyoming Man wrote:
<quoted text>
I would think a pretty good trick would be to not include toxins in foodstuffs, but hey, call me crazy. We may be over-legislated and over-regulated and overly litigious and over-taxed, but one thing we tend to do pretty well here in the US is protect ourselves from putting obviously poisonous things in our grub or on children's toys. Sure, every once in a while someone craps in a spinach field and we get a nice little E. coli or Salmonella outbreak going, but we pretty much agree that milling toxins into food or using lead-containing compounds in kids' toys isn't in the collective best interest...
On an unrelated subject - here's something China seems to want (at least from a capitalistic standpoint), but cannot produce - a democratic society. Be careful whatcha wish for!
And to put things in perspective....

While China is hammered for defective food exports to the US, government records showed that food products from India and Mexico have been rejected more often than those from China. Coming after China were the Dominican Republic, Denmark, Vietnam, Japan, Italy and Indonesia, all of them for shipping contaminated food.

China shipped goods worth a total $288 billion to the US in 2006, compared with Mexicoís $198 billion, Indiaís $22 billion and the Dominican Republicís $5.3 billion.

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