The yin and yang of human rights in C...

The yin and yang of human rights in China

There are 56 comments on the The Japan Times story from Sep 4, 2010, titled The yin and yang of human rights in China. In it, The Japan Times reports that:

The only lady vice minister in China's Foreign Ministry is Fu Ying, a well-coiffed, mild-mannered 57-year-old, an ethnic Mongol who speaks flawless English, who has served as ambassador to the Philippines, Australia and Britain, and who is known for her media skills.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Japan Times.

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Trevor Swistchew

Kingston Upon Thames, UK

#1 Sep 10, 2010
Human Rights are not CCP business.

Since: Apr 10

Hebei, China

#2 Sep 11, 2010
eating babies and raping children are the CCP's business .
Trevor Swistchew

Kingston Upon Thames, UK

#3 Sep 14, 2010
China worst on earth for human wrongs.

Since: Apr 10

Hebei, China

#4 Sep 14, 2010
commies' culture is very sick , it is polluting the world .

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#5 Sep 14, 2010
Human rights and China don't go together.
CRACKA BARREL

New York, NY

#6 Sep 14, 2010
China; love it or leave it.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#7 Sep 14, 2010
SIngapore

Chinese Singaporeans are people of Chinese descent who are born in or immigrated to Singapore and have attained citizenship or permanent residence status. As of 2009, Chinese Singaporeans constitute 74.2% of Singapore's resident population, or approximately three out of four Singaporeans, making them the largest ethnic group in Singapore.

Singapore's standard of living has risen dramatically. Foreign direct investment and a state-led drive to industrialization based on plans drawn up by the Dutch economist Albert Winsemius have created a modern economy focused on industry, education and urban planning.[11] Singapore is the 5th wealthiest country in the world in terms of GDP (PPP) per capita.[12] As of January 2009, Singapore's official reserves stand at US$170.3 billion.

Thailand

about 14% of Thailand's population claim to be of Chinese ethnicity.[3] Extensive intermarriages with the Thais, especially in the past has resulted in many people who claim Chinese ethnicity with Thai ancestry, or mixed.[4] People of Chinese descent are concentrated in the coastal areas of Thailand, principally Bangkok.[5] They are well-represented in all levels of Thai society and play a leading role in business and politics.

Myanmar

The Burmese Chinese dominate the Burmese economy although many enterprises today are co-owned by the military. Moreover, the Burmese Chinese have a disproportionately large presence in Burmese higher education, and make up a high percentage of the educated class in Burma.

Philippines

The Chinese in the Philippines are mostly business owners and their life centers mostly in the family business. These mostly small or medium enterprises play a significant role in the Philippine economy. A handful of these entrepreneurs run large companies and are respected as some of the most prominent business tycoons in the Philippines. Chinese Filipinos attribute their success in business to frugality and hard work, Confucian values and their traditional Chinese customs and traditions. They are very business-minded and entrepreneurship is highly valued and encouraged among the young
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#8 Sep 14, 2010
Malaysia

The Malaysian Chinese have traditionally dominated the Malaysian economy, but with the implementation of affirmative action policies by the Malaysian government to protect the rights of ethnic Malays, their share has somewhat eroded. However, they still make up the majority of the middle- and upper-income classes. As of 2007, they constituted about a quarter of the Malaysian population.

Indonesia

The Chinese are reported to control about 3/4 of the 140 big conglomerates that dominate Indonesia’s private sector.
According to a survey of corporations listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange, the Chinese Indonesian community was thought to own or operate a large fraction of major Indonesian corporations. This is a result of a long government restriction for Chinese Indonesians from going into academia, public service, and other governmental occupations.
although only 3.5% of the population is Chinese, they own or control 70% of the non-land wealth.

Suharto imposed the so-called New Order regime.
For some prominent Chinese businessmen who were friends of Suharto, the New Order was a bonanza: they received huge government contracts and became some of the richest men in Asia.

Cambodia

Under the Khmer Rouge
The Khmer Rouge takeover was catastrophic for the Chinese community for several reasons. When the Khmer Rouge took over a town, they immediately disrupted the local market. According to Willmott, this disruption virtually eliminated retail trade "and the traders (almost all Chinese) became indistinguishable from the unpropertied urban classes."

The Chinese, in addition to having their livelihood eradicated on the whole, also suffered because of their class. They were mainly well-educated urban merchants, and thus were characteristic of the people whom the Khmer Rouge detested. Chinese refugees have reported that they shared the same brutal treatment as other urban Cambodians under the Khmer Rouge régime and that they were not discriminated against as an ethnic group until after the Vietnamese invasion.

Modern years
Of particular note is China's economic role in the country,[5] which encouraged Sino-Khmer businessmen to reestablish their past business which were once suppressed by the Khmer Rouge.

Modern Cambodian economy is highly dependent on Sino-Khmer companies who controlled a large stake in the country's economy,[6] and their support is enhanced by the large presence of lawmakers who are of at least part-Chinese ancestry themselves.[7]
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#9 Sep 14, 2010
Assessment for Chinese in Vietnam

Analytic Summary
The Chinese are reportedly dispersed across the country, although they are concentrated in the southern region of Vietnam, with many residing in and round Ho Chi Minh City They speak Mandarin and other Chinese dialects, but many are also likely to speak Vietnamese. Referred to as the Hoa in Vietnamese, the Chinese are Buddhists and they are physically distinguishable from the Vietnamese, who are referred to as the Kinh . There is limited information available about the cultural characteristics of the Chinese Vietnamese. However, they are likely to share similar cultural characteristics with the Kinh, because of the long period of Chinese Han dynasty domination of Vietnam.

Prior to the 1975 reunification of North and South Vietnam, most Chinese resided in the south, especially around Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City). The southern Chinese were primarily engaged in commerce and they were economically advantaged, partially due to their favored status under French colonial rule.

The 1975 victory of the communist North Vietnam adversely affected the status of the Chinese. All private trade within the country was banned in 1978. Many Hoa businessmen were sent to populate and cultivate land in areas known as New Economic Zones (NEZ). During 1978, the Chinese held several protests in Ho Chi Minh City against the relocations to the NEZs and also to press for Chinese citizenship (PROT75X = 3). The 1979 China-Vietnam border war worsened relations between the Hoa and Kinh communities as some Chinese were viewed as supporting the PRC.

Some prosperous Chinese chose to leave Saigon prior to the fall of South Vietnam, but the major outflow occurred between 1979 and 1981. Many Hoa were among the thousands of Vietnamese boat people who were fleeing the economic and political reconstruction under the Orderly Departure Program. More than 200,000 Chinese left Vietnam for Hong Kong and other Southeast Asian countries during 1979. By 1981, some 227,000 Chinese refugees had been accepted by the PRC alone. Hundreds of thousands of other Hoa and Kinh boat people were to reside in refugee camps in Hong Kong and other South East states for up to two decades after fleeing Vietnam in the late 1970s.

The relationship between the Chinese and state authorities has vastly improved since the late 1970s. Since the early 1980s, political, economic, and cultural restrictions against the Chinese have slowly been lessened. In 1982, for instance, a law was passed which recognized the Hoa as Vietnamese citizens that possess the rights of all other citizens. Restrictions were still maintained on Chinese employment in the security sphere (e.g., armed forces). All employment restrictions were removed in 1986. The Chinese were able to expand their economic influence after Vietnam launched an economic liberalization program late in the decade. Reports indicate that the economically advantaged Chinese control up to 50% of local commercial activities in Ho Chi Minh City.
In the mid-1990s, all official policies that limited the participation of the Chinese in the political sphere were lifted. They possess the same rights as the country's other citizens. The improvement in the status of the Chinese has also been mirrored in the China-Vietnam relationship. Bilateral trade is an important source of revenue for Vietnam; in 1999, trade between the two countries was valued at $1.5 billion, up from $1 billion the previous year, The Hoa have also been critical in helping to draw in foreign investment from other Southeast Asian countries. There is no evidence of political or economic discrimination against the Chinese. The Chinese actively participate in the Communist Party, which in turn advocates for their interests .
There have been no reports of tense relations between the Hoa and the Kinh from 1998-2006. There have been no reported instances of protest or rebellion against the government in recent years
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#10 Sep 14, 2010
Laos

So it was that Vientiane, the capital city of Laos, has seen something of an absence at its heart with the lack of a Chinatown. Of course, support for the Pathet Lao from the Soviet Union was also a contributory factor but the situation is now changing rapidly. Not only are a small number of Chinese pioneers starting to establish businesses in the city, often in tourism or service industries, but rather larger groups of Chinese are entering the country through being hired as construction workers. The Asian Development Bank is leading attempts to integrate Laos more closely into the rapid economic development being enjoyed in many other parts of Southeast Asia through, among other means, an extensive road-building program. This will link Kunming in Yunnan province in the north to, ultimately, Singapore in the south and central Vietnam in the east with, perhaps one day, India in the west. Thousands of Chinese labourers have entered Laos to help build these roads and, once their contracts have expired, many prefer to stay on to build businesses in areas where they have spotted opportunities. Tens of thousands of Chinese are now believed to be in the sparsely-populated north of Laos – accurate numbers are not known – and the Lao government, acutely conscious of the difficulties its low population and low population density have caused, are expressing fears that a parallel state is being established in the northern border region. That is what already appears to have happened in Burma.

North Korea

Chinese Merchants in North Korea – Cure or Poison to Kim Jong Il?

90% daily goods made in China, 50% circulated by Chinese merchants
By Kim Min Se, Reporter from Shinuijoo & Kwon Jeong Hyun, China
[2007-03-07 23:57 ]

While some prospect that North Korea may be an affiliated market of China’s 4 provinces in the Northeast, the real focus is on the merchants who actually control North Korea's markets. Recently, North Korean citizens have been asserting that markets would immobilize if Chinese merchants were to disappear.

Lately, Chinese merchants are nestling themselves with their newly found fortune in North Korea, undeniably to the envy of North Korean citizens.

In a recent telephone conversation with the DailyNK, Kim Chang Yeol (pseudonym) a resident of Shinuiju said “Most of the tiled houses in Shinuiju are owned by Chinese merchants in Shinuiju are upper class and the rich.” Unlike Pyongyang, tiled houses in Shinuiju are greater in value than apartments. In particular, the homes owned by Chinese merchants are luxurious and impressing.

Kim said “At the moment, 90% of daily goods that are traded at Shinuiju markets are made in China.” What Kim means by 90% of goods is basically

everything excluding agricultural produce and medicinal herbs. Apparently, about half of the (90% of) supplies are circulated by Chinese merchants.

Kim affirmed that the market system could be shaken if supplies were not provided by the Chinese merchants. Hence, Chinese merchants have elevated themselves in North Korea’s integrated market system, to the extent that the market could break down without their existence.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#11 Sep 14, 2010
Taiwan

Taiwan's population was estimated in 2005 at 22.9 million, most of whom are on the island of Taiwan. About 98% of the population is of Han Chinese ethnicity. Of these, 86% are descendants of early Han Chinese immigrants known as the "home-province people" (Chinese: 本省&# 20154;; pinyin: Běnshěng rén; literally "home-province person").

Taiwan's quick industrialization and rapid growth during the latter half of the twentieth century, has been called the "Taiwan Miracle" or "Taiwan Economic Miracle". As it has developed alongside Singapore, South Korea, and Hong Kong, Taiwan is one of the industrialized developed countries known as the "Four Asian Tigers".

In 1962, Taiwan had a per capita gross national product (GNP) of $170, placing the island's economy squarely between Zaire and Congo. By 2008 Taiwan's per capita GNP, adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP), had soared to $33,000 (2008 est.) contributing to a Human Development Index equivalent to that of other developed countries

Hong Kong

(Chinese) is a special administrative region of the People's Republic of China. Situated on China's south coast and enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea,[8] it is renowned for its expansive skyline and deep natural harbour. With land mass of 1,104 km2 (426 sq mi) and a population of seven million people, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world.[9] The city's population is 95% ethnic Chinese and 5% from other groups.[10]

Hong Kong is one of the world's leading financial centres.[63] Its highly developed capitalist economy has been ranked the freest in the world by the Index of Economic Freedom for 15 consecutive years.[64][65][66] It is an important centre for international finance and trade, with one of the greatest concentration of corporate headquarters in the Asia-Pacific region, and is known as one of the Four Asian Tigers for its high growth rates and rapid development between the 1960s and 1990s. In addition, Hong Kong's gross domestic product, between 1961 and 1997, has grown 180 times larger than the former while per capita GDP rose by 87 times.

Macau

Macau's economy is based largely on tourism, much of it geared toward gambling. Other chief economic activities in Macau are export-geared textile and garment manufacturing, banking and other financial services.[7] The clothing industry has provided about three quarters of export earnings, and the gaming, tourism and hospitality industry is estimated to contribute more than 50% of Macau's GDP, and 70% of Macau government revenue.[34]

Macau is a founding member of the WTO and has maintained sound economic and trade relations with more than 120 countries and regions, with European Union and Portuguese-speaking countries in particular; Macau is also a member of the IMF.[51] The World Bank classifies Macau as a high income economy[52] and the GDP per capita of the region in 2006 was US$28,436. After the Handover in 1999, there has been a rapid rise in the number of mainland visitors due to China's easing of travel restrictions. Together with the liberalization of Macau's gaming industry in 2001 that induces significant investment inflows, the average growth rate of the economy between 2001 and 2006 was approximately 13.1% annually.[53]
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#12 Sep 14, 2010
Russia

Chinese Migration in Russia
18-05-2005 16:47

ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS
The former representative of the Russian president in the Siberian Federal District, Leonid Drachevsky, stated there are not more than 75,000 Chinese migrants out of a population of 21 million in his region, and that the greatest danger is posed by their economic effect on the region. He is absolutely right. The main problem (at least, for the present) lies not in the number of Chinese migrants, but in the economic damage that Chinese communities inflict on Russia.
The ex-premier of the State Council of China, Zhu Rongji, estimated the volume of people’s trade in 2001 at U.S.$10 billion. The volume of official trade in the same year amounted to U.S.$10.7 billion. The positive balance in the official trade stands at 3 to 5 billion dollars in Russia’s favor. However, the volume of the people’s trade is determined by China’s net income brought by the sale in Russia of Chinese goods – purchased from producers with money earned by selling them in our country. So, actually, the favorable balance in trade belongs to China.

Bolivia

Closer ties

A graduate from a language school in La Paz where class sizes for Chinese are growing each year, Norma Ramos believes the future will see ever closer ties with China.

Bolivian salt flats

"I think it would be great if we could cement our relations with China. We've seen how Peru has developed after it signed a free trade agreement with China," she says.

As ordinary Bolivians acknowledge the growing economic importance of China, China itself is noticeably increasing its programme of co-operation with Bolivia.

China has said it will construct Bolivia's first satellite, as well as build a fast electric trainline for the country. It is also collaborating on mining and energy projects.

But one of China's biggest interests is in Bolivia's rich natural resources, specifically its lithium deposits in the Uyuni desert, high in the Andes.

Brazil

The flurry of China-Brazil business began less than two years ago after an exchange of visits between Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva and Chinese President Hu Jintao.
Since then China's influence can be seen everywhere in Latin America: oil, gas, railways, ports, steel and - worryingly for the US - defence.
In Sao Paulo, Chinese language classes are packed. Not only are students taught how to speak Mandarin, but they are also guided in cultural habits such as attending banquets and singing Chinese folk songs.
"Everything I do is with China now," says one student Priscila Marques, who runs a freight forwarding company. "It's Brazil-China; nowhere else

CHINESE IN PERU
 
China throughout much of modern history has been responsible for settling millions of its people throughout the world. In 2000 estimates were that at least 34 million Chinese were living in 140 countries.
The primary migration to Peru falls under the Huagong system from 1849 through 1874 where they worked in the processing of guano (fertilizer) along the coast and on the sugar plantations..

Their situation as being indentured was deplorable for the nearly 100,000 Chinese who migrated. One of the reasons they were imported as workers is that there was a shortage in Peru and the employers believed they had more control over foreign workers who were isolated from their homeland. Suicides, rebellions and escapes were quite common. And, in the war against Chile numerous Chinese took up arms against their overseers.  Many of the Chinese remained when their contracts were up as small farmers and shopkeepers.

Many of the Chinese have moved into the middle class economically despite continued discrimination and racism
Squatting Chinaman

Seymour, TN

#13 Sep 14, 2010
CRACKA BARREL wrote:
China; love it or leave it.
WE did dunb azz, that why we and you are in America!!!

a-hahahahahahaha

Since: Apr 10

Hebei, China

#14 Sep 14, 2010
yes , great number of Chinese are escaping to America .
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#15 Sep 15, 2010
Squatting Chinaman wrote:
<quoted text>
WE did dunb azz, that why we and you are in America!!!
a-hahahahahahaha
no he is their to help push out the stupid lazy whites

because when they say America isnt going down... they are Correct.. because the Chinese and top 20% will have the money to survive... while white trash like you wont....
HJT

United States

#16 Sep 15, 2010
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
<quoted text>
no he is their to help push out the stupid lazy whites
because when they say America isnt going down... they are Correct.. because the Chinese and top 20% will have the money to survive... while white trash like you wont....
Not really, I came here for a better life, Sorry!!

A-HHAHHAHAHHAHAHAHAHA
CRACKA BARREL

United States

#17 Sep 15, 2010
Sorry guys, I am off my meds,

Anyone really want to talk?

Since: Oct 09

Vancouver

#18 Sep 15, 2010
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
<quoted text>
no he is their to help push out the stupid lazy whites
because when they say America isnt going down... they are Correct.. because the Chinese and top 20% will have the money to survive... while white trash like you wont....
Your in Vancouver, what makes you an expert in the States?
CRACKA BARREL

United States

#19 Sep 15, 2010
Cana wrote:
<quoted text>
Your in Vancouver, what makes you an expert in the States?
We are really not experts on any subject, just like to paste and cut!!

Resistance is the # one Paste and cut man!

A-HHAHHAHAHHAHAHAHAHA
CRACKA BARREL

United States

#20 Sep 15, 2010
CRACKA BARREL wrote:
China; love it or leave it.
The more I think about this one, I really have bured out.

I did leave it.

A-HHAHHAHAHHAHAHAHAHA

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