ACLU Challenges School Uniform Policy

ACLU Challenges School Uniform Policy

There are 38 comments on the WJW Fox 8 Cleveland story from Aug 20, 2010, titled ACLU Challenges School Uniform Policy. In it, WJW Fox 8 Cleveland reports that:

The American Civil Liberties Union is challenging a new dress code requirement. The policy -- due to be implemented next month -- requires public school students to wear black or khaki pants, maroon or gray shirts and closed-toe shoes.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WJW Fox 8 Cleveland.

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Kim

Cleveland, OH

#21 Aug 20, 2010
Nicole,
Go to Walmart, you can get pants and shirts there pretty cheap. I understand clothing can be costly. But seriously uniforms are cheaper than clothes from some of the name brand. I grew up where all my parents bought my clothes at K-Mart and boy did I get made fun of because I did not have the "right" brand of clothing. It made my years at school quite difficult. With uniforms everyone is dressed the same way. My son has worn a uniform since 1st grade. Maybe you should compare cost of uniforms w/ everyday clothings. You would be quite surprice.
vice65

Cleveland, OH

#22 Aug 20, 2010
Maybe it's time the sane people of the US filed a complaint against the ACLU and parents that are too stupid to figure out that 10-15 dollar uniform pants and shirts are cheaper than 20+ dollar jeans and name brand logo shirts. It's time the hippies of the 60's grow-up and wake-up. I'll bet you'll never see an ACLU mouthpiece show up in a court room in "stylish" holed jeans and a wife beater t-shirt.........why, it's not the correct "UNIFORM" for a court room. The same holds true for a school, save your fashion statement for the parties and the beach.

“I will not keep my voice down!”

Since: Dec 09

Location hidden

#23 Aug 20, 2010
I don't understand. If you can afford to buy regular clothes for your kids, then why can't you afford to buy uniform clothes? They are cheaper than the name brand stuff anyway! I see uniform clothes at Walmart, Kmart, etc. Maybe it's just not cool enough to shop for clothes at anywhere other than the Baby Phat store or Fubu?
Cleveland-West_S ide

Erie, PA

#24 Aug 20, 2010
The problem with kids dressing the same, it's hard to identify them when a crime is committed.
I'm just a few blocks from Lincoln West, so you can imagine all the nonsense that goes on every day, thank god the kids aren't wearing uniforms or we'd never be able to catch anyone.
Most police I've talked to that patrol the schools have made comments about the difficulty with identification. It can be a nightmare.

“I will not keep my voice down!”

Since: Dec 09

Location hidden

#25 Aug 20, 2010
Cleveland-West_Side wrote:
The problem with kids dressing the same, it's hard to identify them when a crime is committed.
I'm just a few blocks from Lincoln West, so you can imagine all the nonsense that goes on every day, thank god the kids aren't wearing uniforms or we'd never be able to catch anyone.
Most police I've talked to that patrol the schools have made comments about the difficulty with identification. It can be a nightmare.
I never thought about that....good point.

Since: Apr 10

United States

#26 Aug 20, 2010
The ACLU says that dress codes are a burden on the parents?! Duh!! Raising kids is a burden on the parents, you idiots. School uniforms or Dress Codes are a positive influence on order in school. I'm all for them.
markbano

Cleburne, TX

#27 Aug 20, 2010
Nikki H wrote:
I don't understand. If you can afford to buy regular clothes for your kids, then why can't you afford to buy uniform clothes? They are cheaper than the name brand stuff anyway! I see uniform clothes at Walmart, Kmart, etc. Maybe it's just not cool enough to shop for clothes at anywhere other than the Baby Phat store or Fubu?
I think what some people are saying is they can't really afford to buy regular clothes, let alone specialty clothing which will not be worn outside of school. They, therefore, still have to find some way to get the regular clothes except now with the added financial burden of first having to buy the required clothing.

I am all for dress codes which limit the extremes to which some people push the wardrobe envelope. But I do see how uniforms can be financially challenging for some.
Punk666

Canton, OH

#28 Aug 20, 2010
I agree with the ACLU. How is making parents buy uniforms gonna improve education? The school isn't gonna change because the kids are wearing different clothes.

How about some real change, like heads rolling at the board of education. Cutting overpaid administrators and ineffective teachers hiding behind "seniority" instead?
Cleveland-West_S ide

Erie, PA

#29 Aug 20, 2010
Nikki H wrote:
<quoted text>
I never thought about that....good point.
Remember just a few years ago when the kids were wearing the long plain white t-shirts that went down to their knees? Every gas station and bodega in the city were selling them for $5 a piece.
For a few years it was really hard to give descriptions, you had to pay attention to the shoes, a lot of kids were caught by shoe descriptions.
That's one of the first things we inform new members to our block club and block watch, try to get a good look at their shoes. The kids spend a lot of money on them and never toss'm out.
Simon - UK

Birmingham, UK

#30 Aug 20, 2010
This is really none of my business I suppose as I don't live in the US, but I can relate my experience here as we have had uniforms in the vast majority of our schools for years.
The uniform can give parents and teachers some pride in belonging to a school. It does stop some brand jealousy too, as all the kids wear the same clothes, and although the initial financial outlay can be hard for some people, it's a lot cheaper than 200 (pounds) Reeboks or Nike's. Most school uniform can be purchased cheaply from the larger supermarkets here. It works well generally. The point about the problems being about the kids and not the clothes?.. yes, I agree. But at least the poorer family's kids look just as good as the more well off kids. Every so often pressure groups here try to get the school uniform in certain schools removed, but in the vast majority of times, once they have a uniform most people want to keep it.

“I will not keep my voice down!”

Since: Dec 09

Location hidden

#31 Aug 20, 2010
markbano wrote:
<quoted text>
I think what some people are saying is they can't really afford to buy regular clothes, let alone specialty clothing which will not be worn outside of school. They, therefore, still have to find some way to get the regular clothes except now with the added financial burden of first having to buy the required clothing.
I am all for dress codes which limit the extremes to which some people push the wardrobe envelope. But I do see how uniforms can be financially challenging for some.
I understand that. But kids NEED clothing. Along with food, water, shelter - that is a necessity. I am having a hard time understanding what these kids actually WEAR then if their parents "can't afford to buy clothes"? Do you see what I am saying? I mean, we are by no means hard up in my family, but I still go to garage sales and get great used clothes for my daughter once in a while. And I was just at Walmart last night looking for a birthday gift and the uniform clothes they have there are really, really cheap. Plus, weren't they talking about giving some $50 voucher to needy families for the uniforms? I thought I read that a few weeks back...

“I will not keep my voice down!”

Since: Dec 09

Location hidden

#32 Aug 20, 2010
Cleveland-West_Side wrote:
<quoted text>
Remember just a few years ago when the kids were wearing the long plain white t-shirts that went down to their knees? Every gas station and bodega in the city were selling them for $5 a piece.
For a few years it was really hard to give descriptions, you had to pay attention to the shoes, a lot of kids were caught by shoe descriptions.
That's one of the first things we inform new members to our block club and block watch, try to get a good look at their shoes. The kids spend a lot of money on them and never toss'm out.
I still see them wearing those ridiculous t-shirts.(Look more like dresses, if you ask me though). Great idea about the shoes! I would assume that if you are looking for a suspect who is described as a "teenage black male wearing a white t-shirt and saggy jeans" it would really be quite hard to nab any criminal...ever!

“I will not keep my voice down!”

Since: Dec 09

Location hidden

#33 Aug 20, 2010
Simon - UK wrote:
This is really none of my business I suppose as I don't live in the US, but I can relate my experience here as we have had uniforms in the vast majority of our schools for years.
The uniform can give parents and teachers some pride in belonging to a school. It does stop some brand jealousy too, as all the kids wear the same clothes, and although the initial financial outlay can be hard for some people, it's a lot cheaper than 200 (pounds) Reeboks or Nike's. Most school uniform can be purchased cheaply from the larger supermarkets here. It works well generally. The point about the problems being about the kids and not the clothes?.. yes, I agree. But at least the poorer family's kids look just as good as the more well off kids. Every so often pressure groups here try to get the school uniform in certain schools removed, but in the vast majority of times, once they have a uniform most people want to keep it.
Great point, Simon. Poorer kids don't have to "keep up with the Joneses" so to speak and they don't have to be ashamed if they aren't coming to school in the latest styles when uniforms are implemented.
annie

AOL

#34 Aug 20, 2010
they also need to have dress codes for teachers,,,,,,some of them dress worse than the kids..
sickofthenonsens e

Bryant, AR

#35 Aug 20, 2010
Maybe clothes are only part of the answer- how about parenting? At least once a week on the news some gangbanger kid is shot and the mother (no father is ever around) sobs what a good boy he was. If she had done her job and raised the kid with morals- the dumbass would never have been shot.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#36 Aug 31, 2010
I live near Woonsocket RI. The parents who are sueing the Woonsocket Dept of Education should be ashamed of themselves. Being a concerned parent, one of my main concerns would be the fact that there are gangs in Woonsocket. They represent themselves with different colors. I've seen this even at a local church carnival. What if you're child was wearing "non uniform" street clothes and put on the wrong color one day? They could be beaten, hurt etc. Secondly, isnt it much better to have all kids to appear as EQUAL. No special groups wearing Jordans, Seven Jeans, Coach bags, North Face etc. Also, the girls barely wear clothes in this rough neighborhood. A lot of them dress provocatively which can be distracting to the boys in class. The uniforms are easy to obtain at Target or Walmart, so cost is not an issue. As for the kids freedom of speech being taken away....This is just pathetic and the ACLU should be disolved. The kids shouldn't be able to show their creativity with their clothes, it should be with their personality, knowledge, school artwork, music and school sports. This country is GONE. The bummy parents complaining probably had their kids as teenages and they probably encourage the kids to dress slutty, want them to be "cool" or do drugs themselves. Makes me sick to see this happening in our country. The town should be able to define a dress code beyond restricting short shorts and tight shirts.

“Not Perfect, Just Forgiven”

Since: May 10

Bloom Where You're Planted!

#37 Aug 31, 2010
Nikki H wrote:
<quoted text>
I understand that. But kids NEED clothing. Along with food, water, shelter - that is a necessity. I am having a hard time understanding what these kids actually WEAR then if their parents "can't afford to buy clothes"? Do you see what I am saying? I mean, we are by no means hard up in my family, but I still go to garage sales and get great used clothes for my daughter once in a while. And I was just at Walmart last night looking for a birthday gift and the uniform clothes they have there are really, really cheap. Plus, weren't they talking about giving some $50 voucher to needy families for the uniforms? I thought I read that a few weeks back...
Glad you brought up garage sales -- and what about the Salvation Army, and Goodwill, and many, many other secondhand stores that are everywhere these days?? Seems that everyone wants NEW clothes -- my kids only get new clothes from Grandma and Grandpa at Christmas and their birthday, and that's only a couple of outfits. If they need something in between time, we shop SA, or they do without.
(Granted, we homeschool, so that part doesn't apply to us now, but we did the same when they WERE in government school.) I'm ALL for school uniforms, though. Always have been.

“Meh.”

Since: Aug 10

Location hidden

#38 Sep 1, 2010
It might clear things up quickly if the schools are able to point to uniform clothing being made available at affordable prices or detailing plans to help offset costs for low income students.

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