Two Women Face Drug Charges After Arrest In Glastonbury

There are 12 comments on the Hartford Courant story from Jun 20, 2009, titled Two Women Face Drug Charges After Arrest In Glastonbury. In it, Hartford Courant reports that:

An Avon woman and a Winsted woman are scheduled to appear in Superior Court in Manchester Tuesday on drug charges after police said they found the two parked in a remote area of the Glen Lochen parking lot on June 14.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hartford Courant.

Over The Line

Wallingford, CT

#1 Jun 20, 2009
I'm sure that the prosecutors would make all this go away if they were State Legislators!
Not_You

East Hartford, CT

#2 Jun 20, 2009
Over The Line wrote:
I'm sure that the prosecutors would make all this go away if they were State Legislators!
Good to see that the idiot commenters jumped on this story right away with their insightful and constructive thoughts.
Over The Line

Wallingford, CT

#3 Jun 20, 2009
Not_You wrote:
<quoted text>
Good to see that the idiot commenters jumped on this story right away with their insightful and constructive thoughts.
Speak for yourself - my comment was a metaphor for the hypocrisy of those who keep drugs from being legalized.
oiuoiu

South Windsor, CT

#4 Jun 20, 2009
heh? What the hell are you talking about? So you want durgs legal I guess is what you are saying?
Sean

Hartford, CT

#5 Jun 20, 2009
This is obviously a sting. We all know there are no drugs in bucolic places like Avon or Winsted. Even in Glastonbury as we know from the other story the self-admitted druggies are actually Hartfordites who will try and eat their drugs when caught. Note to druggies: you were probably easy to pick out in the remote area of the parking lot because no self-respecting suburbanites would ever walk that far from their car to the store. (Note to normal people - please explain this facetious message to any humor-impaired friends you might find reading it.)
Gladys

East Berlin, CT

#6 Jun 20, 2009
Avon? Winsted? Say it ain't so!
WestHartford

United States

#7 Jun 20, 2009
why weren't they shot for pointing the herion needle at the officers?!!!?!
Lloyd M Schieldge

Richmond, VA

#8 Jun 21, 2009
What a waste to have scared their lives so young with that crap. Heroine isnít exactly the kind of drug nice young ladies select for their first time drug experience. I suspect we will/have see(n) these names in various Police Reports for the remainder of their pathetic lives. They will land up on welfare or disability and we will support them financially throughout it all.
you go jodi

Manchester, CT

#9 Jun 21, 2009
residual benifits... the "grand social experiment"

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#10 Jun 21, 2009
Lloyd M Schieldge wrote:
What a waste to have scared their lives so young with that crap. Heroine isnít exactly the kind of drug nice young ladies select for their first time drug experience. I suspect we will/have see(n) these names in various Police Reports for the remainder of their pathetic lives. They will land up on welfare or disability and we will support them financially throughout it all.
Actually it is the jails and police record that are more likely to ruin their lives than the drugs themselves. Prohibition ruins lives not only by subjecting these young women and millions of other people to the brutalities of jail and the disruptions of employment and family caused by prosecutions. Prohibition also ruins lives by making the drugs and the commerce as dangerous as possible.

In a legally regulated market for heroin and other drugs, at least the purity and dosage would be known, preventing most accidental overdoses and poisonings. The commerce would be age-restricted, and thus licensed retailers would have reason to check ID's, presumably refusing these women who are under 21. Organized crime and gangs and other unregulated dealers would be forced out of the market, and the commerce would be removed from residential neighborhoods and into licensed dispensaries or shops offering referrals for counseling or treatment on request.

Meanwhile, these arrests are absurd. All charges should be dropped. It is the lawmakers who are criminal here, abdicating their constitutional responsibility to regulate the drug trade, instead pushing it into the chaos and danger of the black market.
John

Bartow, FL

#11 Jun 21, 2009
timemachinist wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually it is the jails and police record that are more likely to ruin their lives than the drugs themselves. Prohibition ruins lives not only by subjecting these young women and millions of other people to the brutalities of jail and the disruptions of employment and family caused by prosecutions. Prohibition also ruins lives by making the drugs and the commerce as dangerous as possible.
In a legally regulated market for heroin and other drugs, at least the purity and dosage would be known, preventing most accidental overdoses and poisonings. The commerce would be age-restricted, and thus licensed retailers would have reason to check ID's, presumably refusing these women who are under 21. Organized crime and gangs and other unregulated dealers would be forced out of the market, and the commerce would be removed from residential neighborhoods and into licensed dispensaries or shops offering referrals for counseling or treatment on request.
Meanwhile, these arrests are absurd. All charges should be dropped. It is the lawmakers who are criminal here, abdicating their constitutional responsibility to regulate the drug trade, instead pushing it into the chaos and danger of the black market.
Get your head out of your a$$! We have 15 year olds experimenting with H in high schools these days who end up dead, and you want it legalized? How can you even consider that as an option? I guess you need to see more dead kids to come to your senses. Once its legalized, its more accessible, don't kid yourself. Just as alcohol is. Might as well legalize cocaine too huh? Only a drug addict would think like this to begin with.

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#12 Jun 26, 2009
John wrote:
<quoted text>
Get your head out of your a$$! We have 15 year olds experimenting with H in high schools these days who end up dead, and you want it legalized? How can you even consider that as an option? I guess you need to see more dead kids to come to your senses. Once its legalized, its more accessible, don't kid yourself. Just as alcohol is. Might as well legalize cocaine too huh? Only a drug addict would think like this to begin with.
If you want to play the "kids on drugs" card, how would say current drug policies are working?

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